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View Full Version : Cutting boards - Lone Star or Boardsmith?



antbanks
01-16-2013, 10:31 PM
Anyone have experience with these boards that they are willing to share? I am looking to get an end grain board in walnut and have narrowed my search to these two. I guess if anyone has recommendations to other boards I am open to that as well.

Thanks for your input,
Anthony

Pensacola Tiger
01-16-2013, 10:34 PM
I have both. Get a BoardSMITH. It took me a long time with a sanding block, 400 wet/dry and mineral oil to get the surface of the LoneStar board anywhere near the smoothness of the BoardSMITH.

Rick

jimbob
01-16-2013, 10:38 PM
Cant say ive used lone star but got a maple magnum recently and it is impeccable. I challenge you to find a bad word about daves boards! After treatment with bees wax and mineral oil it is nicely waterproof and easy to wipe down. Stains are easily removed. (seems to do it by itself sometimes! its alive!). I also recommend getting as big as your work area allows, im glad i did now, so much easier.

antbanks
01-16-2013, 10:41 PM
What about feet, did you guys get feet with it? I am thinking it might be nice to use both sides.

kalaeb
01-16-2013, 10:41 PM
I cannot comment on the Lone Star apart from they look nice, but I love my walnut Boardsmith. It has seen a year of hard use and so far held up very well.

And yes, I got the feet with mine as it is perpetually on the counter top and I did not want to have to worry about drying.

Pensacola Tiger
01-16-2013, 10:43 PM
What about feet, did you guys get feet with it? I am thinking it might be nice to use both sides.

I got feet on both boards. You really want feet to keep the board elevated so water doesn't get trapped underneath it. The feet also keep it from sliding on a countertop.

EdipisReks
01-16-2013, 10:47 PM
i use one of these (http://www.amazon.com/Architec-Gripper-Smartmat-20-Inch-Gray/dp/B000MD7YTA) under my two boards (a Boos and an older birch end grain block from Ikea that i've put a lot of work into), and it works great.

tk59
01-16-2013, 11:04 PM
I've owned a number of different boards. In the last couple of years, I've purchased a half dozen BoardSMITH boards of different sizes. I got one with feet. They are nice but I prefer to prop them up on little rubber feet that aren't attached and be able to use both sides. If you get a BoardSMITH, you may have to wait longer than you think is reasonable but the it's worth it.

The hekler
01-16-2013, 11:29 PM
Boardsmith has a huge following here, whenever anyone asks about a board his are always the first recommended. You can check out his sub forum here as he is also a member and see even more of his work. I haven't yet bought one, but when the time comes I will!

antbanks
01-16-2013, 11:32 PM
I currently have an asahi rubber cutting board that I got from Korin. For that I put a Silpat under it to keep it from sliding around and that works well. And I can used both side. But I have really gotten into higher end knives and believe a nice end grain cutting board is the way to go. I was thinking to get a groove cut on one side for meat/roasts and then leave the other flat, but no feet so I can switch it around. But maybe tk59 is on to something and I should go overboard like I do with my 240 gyuto collection and just get multiple boards :biggrin:

Marko Tsourkan
01-16-2013, 11:50 PM
Just looked at Lone Star boards, and can tall you right away that Dave's are better made, more durable, and are less likely to warp. It has to do with the width of the planks used, grain direction of the planks and a final board thickness. I would stay away from boards that are thinner than 1 7/8 if you plan on washing it with water.

How do I know? I used to dabble in making end-grain boards at one time, and Dave's work was an inspiration.

antbanks
01-17-2013, 12:12 AM
Marko - Thanks a lot for your feedback, it is greatly appreciated....may be looking into getting on your list for a custom gyuto!

Thanks to everyone else as well. Looks like i will be going with the boardsmith.

Anthony

mr drinky
01-17-2013, 01:01 AM
I have a 1 3/4 inch board and have never had a single problem with it warping. Just throwing that out there. If you treat a board well, it should not be a problem, but of course a 2-inch board will be more stable.

Totally agree with Marko on the LoneStar boards.

I also second what others have said about NOT getting feet on your board so you can use both sides, and it reduces the board height. I just buy those rubbermaid sink matts at Target. They are nice because they are made to let moisture through and they are very easy to clean.

k.

mc2442
01-17-2013, 01:27 AM
I've owned a number of different boards. In the last couple of years, I've purchased a half dozen BoardSMITH boards of different sizes. I got one with feet. They are nice but I prefer to prop them up on little rubber feet that aren't attached and be able to use both sides. If you get a BoardSMITH, you may have to wait longer than you think is reasonable but the it's worth it.

6 Boardsmith boards and who knows how many knives. Have you ever posted pictures of you kitchen?

tk59
01-17-2013, 02:29 AM
I didn't say I still have them, lol. I currently have two actually. The rest have been gifted, traded or sold. I'm thinking about replacing my walnut board with maple though... As for washing in water, I haven't had any problem. Dave made one for me that was under 1.5" thick and it washed fine in water. You just can't be soaking them in it.

Marko Tsourkan
01-17-2013, 08:15 AM
I had two of my boards cupped on me after the first wash. I figured out later what I didn't do right (small thing, but important), so experience helps. Width and thickness of the boards (fewer glue joints), grain layout (boards move, so layout has to cancel or minimize movements to prevent cracks) and interlocking (bricklaying pattern) makes a more durable board. When I look at any boards, I look for these things.

I think you know what you getting when you buy Dave's board.

If you get a large board, the thickness should not be below 1 7/8". A large size board should be stationary, and one-sided - it should not be moved around too much because of the weight, and it needs to be elevated over the counter top, so air gets under it. Feet can be recessed if height is an issue.

Squilliam
01-17-2013, 10:56 AM
I didn't say I still have them, lol. I currently have two actually. The rest have been gifted, traded or sold. I'm thinking about replacing my walnut board with maple though... As for washing in water, I haven't had any problem. Dave made one for me that was under 1.5" thick and it washed fine in water. You just can't be soaking them in it.

What do you prefer about maple? Is it just the colour?

antbanks
01-17-2013, 03:38 PM
So what would be considered a "large" board? And why should it be stationary and one sided? Are you saying it should not be washed in the sink ever? Thanks for all the advice and input here.

Anthony

Marko Tsourkan
01-17-2013, 04:43 PM
I have 23x15.25x2 board in cherry. It weighs 15.5lb. I have no problem putting it into a sink (narrow end), clean it with a soap and wash it under a hot water, but agree this is a not a light board to lug around the kitchen. Board without feet might skid on the counter top and you don't want to drop endgrain board on the floor. It might crack along seams.

I don't understand the need to use both sides of the board, and besides, those finger grooves that you see on some board, they are not very deep so I am not sure how effective they are. Finger recesses make more sense, but those make the one-sided board. Also, even with proper care, the board might move and cap, and rubber feet absorb those changes. Without feet, you might get your board rocking.

If a board is seasoned properly by the maker, you can wash it (as I do now), even under running water.

TB_London
01-18-2013, 11:04 AM
Have had a Boardsmith for a few months and love everything about it. The details are thought out which really makes the difference, for me anyway.

Notaskinnychef
02-16-2013, 09:10 AM
I have a catskill 20x20x3 board and its a brute, but i love the height (I also put small feet on it). My bowls fit just under the edge so i can set up my bowls along the sides and move stuff around. Granted at 30 pounds this is not a small or mobile piece, but with a good scraper, cleaning it is easy. Used 2 pints of oil tho in the first month lol

rriley
02-16-2013, 09:53 AM
I know that Boardsmith is popular on this forum but I had some problems with regard to customer service and cannot recommend him for that reason and I have since seen posts on other forums that also criticized Boardsmith's service. There is a thread somewhere on this forum about a company named Vermont Butcher Block which looks like a better alternative and they will also do matching knife blocks if you wish.

Pensacola Tiger
02-16-2013, 10:32 AM
I know that Boardsmith is popular on this forum but I had some problems with regard to customer service and cannot recommend him for that reason and I have since seen posts on other forums that also criticized Boardsmith's service. There is a thread somewhere on this forum about a company named Vermont Butcher Block which looks like a better alternative and they will also do matching knife blocks if you wish.

Please back up your criticism with some facts, otherwise your post is meaningless innuendo. Citing "other forums" is just as weak.

SameGuy
02-16-2013, 10:51 AM
By all accounts, Boardsmith boards are the ne plus ultra of cutting boards, and Dave The Boardsmith has a great reputation among the cognoscenti here and elsewhere.

That said, if you've had a chance to stop by another Dave's shop in downtown Burlington, Vermont, you'll see that Vermont Butcher Block & Board Company makes beautiful cutting boards, both stock and to order, along with beastly standard knife blocks. Vermont Dave also makes custom knife blocks that fit your specific knives.

DeepCSweede
02-16-2013, 10:52 AM
Please back up your criticism with some facts, otherwise your post is meaningless innuendo. Citing "other forums" is just as weak.

I think what Rick is trying to say is please elaborate on what your issue was or most members here will disregard it. Also, to blanketly say that someone would be happier with Vermont without having any experience with them yourself and saying that they are a better alternative is a bit disingenuous. Most of us have had great experiences with Boardsmith and that is why they are popular. I have nothing against Vermont however and it appears that they make beautiful stuff. I especially like the knife blocks I have seen from them but I have never used one of their boards, thus I keep my mouth shut about them.

SameGuy
02-16-2013, 11:00 AM
Good points. I have not actually put a Vermont board into actual use, but have seen and picked them up in person at the shop on Church Street. They are very well made indeed.

Pensacola Tiger
02-16-2013, 11:03 AM
I think what Rick is trying to say is please elaborate on what your issue was or most members here will disregard it. Also, to blanketly say that someone would be happier with Vermont without having any experience with them yourself and saying that they are a better alternative is a bit disingenuous. Most of us have had great experiences with Boardsmith and that is why they are popular. I have nothing against Vermont however and it appears that they make beautiful stuff. I especially like the knife blocks I have seen from them but I have never used one of their boards, thus I keep my mouth shut about them.

Thanks for amplifying my post and clarifying it. I came off as a little abrupt, but unsubstantiated criticism has no place in this discussion.

RobinW
02-16-2013, 12:49 PM
I can only echo what most people have already said. The only high end boards ive ever used are BoardSmiths. 3 have passed through my hands so far, and they and customer service has been impeccable.

Kumar
02-16-2013, 01:08 PM
After doing research and reading options on variety of forums (here, Chowhound, Foodie Forums, etc) I went with the Boardsmith. They have a 2-3 week waiting period, which makes sense for quality work. Can't wait to get my hands on one, already measured out where in the kitchen it is going to go!

Patatas Bravas
02-16-2013, 02:58 PM
I am also thinking of a new board and I have seen that Boardsmith has 4 woods - maple, mahogany, cherry and walnut. Of course they all have different appearances, but I am thinking about which is the best wood. Does any one have an opinion? For example, the BS website is saying that they have various hardness but that the endgrain structures are important and all these ones are durable, and so maybe this means to the maker these 4 woods are equal. Thanks for any suggestions


I've owned a number of different boards. In the last couple of years, I've purchased a half dozen BoardSMITH boards of different sizes. I got one with feet. They are nice but I prefer to prop them up on little rubber feet that aren't attached and be able to use both sides. If you get a BoardSMITH, you may have to wait longer than you think is reasonable but the it's worth it.

I'm interested in these feet - do you maybe have a link to them? Maybe it is better than having the permanent feet put on the bottom side

rriley
02-16-2013, 04:07 PM
Please back up your criticism with some facts, otherwise your post is meaningless innuendo. Citing "other forums" is just as weak.

I was simply responding to the original poster who is looking for a board and solicited information. Responding to your request for "facts" serves no purpose other than to initiate a flame war; this is a nice forum and civility has been apparent here.

Pensacola Tiger
02-16-2013, 04:59 PM
Deleted.

wenus2
02-16-2013, 05:56 PM
... 4 woods - maple, mahogany, cherry and walnut. Of course they all have different appearances, but I am thinking about which is the best wood. Does any one have an opinion?

Maple is generally regarded king. The most plain looking and performance minded of the bunch.
It's like street racing, be wary of the guy who didn't spend any money on paint... it's all under the hood.

mc2442
02-16-2013, 06:15 PM
Have maple....love the board....to do over again might have done walnut, but definietly Boardsmith!!!

Notaskinnychef
02-16-2013, 11:34 PM
while I am sure that catskill craftsmen boards arent the highest end boards, for those in the US, amazon sells them and they are really reasonable.

18x18x3 80 bucks with Free shipping http://www.amazon.com/Catskill-Craftsmen-Wood-Grain-Cutting/dp/B00004RIXP/ref=sr_1_24?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1361071940&sr=1-24
20x20x3 105 with free shipping http://www.amazon.com/Catskill-Craftsmen-Super-Finger-Grooves/dp/B0002HE13I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1361071931&sr=8-1&keywords=super+slab

having the 20x20, I really love the massive work space, altho I am sure a 24x18 would have worked a bit better, but for the price its solid and appears to be really well made, no issues with mine.

Deckhand
02-17-2013, 12:58 AM
I have a Boardsmith maple magnum board with the feet, and I am very happy with it. It will probably become a family heirloom. I will never sell it, and don't know how I ever got by before I had it.

WildBoar
02-17-2013, 08:58 AM
We bought 3 BoardSmith boards from 2010-12. Two are maple centers with 'nicer' woods around the outside, and the third is all cherry. They stay out on the counters and get daily use. A couple months ago my mom picked one up, and we gave one to my 16 yo niece, who is getting interested in cooking. I had briefly met David Smith at an ECG a couple years ago, but did not really get to talk to him until late last year. Now I know he is a very nice guy, in addition to producting top-quality cutting boards. Frankly I'm sure there are some other makers out there who may make boards of similar quality, but I'll stick w/ Dave for future purchases for the same reasons I stick with may of the makers and vendors here on this forum.

As far as customer service/ customer relations goes, I know it can be difficult for a small vendor/ maker to keep up with the flow of emails and phone calls. The same is true for other types of small businesses. And of course it is true for big business as well. Usually it is best to call the makers/ vendors if you need a timely response, as they are in the shop working all day and not camped out in front of a computer answering emails. Also, personalities often come across different in forums and in emails then when actually talking on the phone or face-to-face.

We will be ordering 2 more boards from David shortly to give as wedding presents.

tomsch
02-17-2013, 10:47 PM
I have a Boos edge cut maple that I do like but if I ever gift it to my kids I'll be going with a Boardsmith that will stay on the counter full time.

theLawlCat
02-18-2013, 09:46 PM
The next board I buy will likely be a boardsmith because of how ridiculously well liked his stuff is here.

For what it's worth, I have a lone star cherry board that stays out on the counter full time right now. Hasn't been anything but satisfactory so far and he upgraded the thickness for free because he was a little late getting around to my order.

ThEoRy
02-18-2013, 10:28 PM
I was simply responding to the original poster who is looking for a board and solicited information. Responding to your request for "facts" serves no purpose other than to initiate a flame war; this is a nice forum and civility has been apparent here.

Is this the thread with the issue? http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/showtopic.php?tid/870947/ :tease:

SameGuy
02-19-2013, 01:31 PM
Hehehehe