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View Full Version : Laser versus non-laser gyuto



mark76
01-24-2013, 01:23 AM
I recently got both an Artifex 210 mm gyuto and a Konosuke HH 150 mm petty. I had the Artifex thinned out behind the edge before I got it.

The Artifex cut great. However, when I cut some veggies using the Konosuke, it cut even greater. I simply had a noticeable thinner blade. (The issue was not so much that the Artifex quickly wedged - I had it been thinned out - it simply had a thicker blade.) On the other hand, the size and height of the Artifex are much better for cutting most stuff.

Now my question is: does a Konosuke 210/240 mm gyuto have a similar thickness and profile as the Konosuke 150 mm petty? I that case I will at least consider a laser gyuto like the Konosuke (Gesshin Ginga, Suisin, ...)

WiscoNole
01-24-2013, 01:44 AM
Yes, you will find a similar thin profile on the gyuto, and yes, it does make a noticeable difference.

that said, I would definitely get a Tadatsuna over a Suisin, and I have owned both. The Suisin seems much more factory-made (I.E. stamped kanji vs. engraved, lack of handle pin, etc).

labor of love
01-24-2013, 02:04 AM
suisins come with a saya pins, if thats the same as a handle pins.

chuck239
01-24-2013, 02:13 AM
I don't think laser or non laser matters. When cutting, I think the thinness behind the edge is what shows. My gengetsu and kochi both cut with less resistance then my suisin or tadatsuna cut.... Just my opinion but grind and thinness behind the edge both account for better ease of cutting then the thickness of the knife at the spine..

-Chuck

El Pescador
01-24-2013, 10:53 AM
I don't think laser or non laser matters. When cutting, I think the thinness behind the edge is what shows. My gengetsu and kochi both cut with less resistance then my suisin or tadatsuna cut.... Just my opinion but grind and thinness behind the edge both account for better ease of cutting then the thickness of the knife at the spine..

-Chuck

+1... It's the blade profile that causes this. It's not that it's just thinned behind the edge, it where the conveying begins and how much. You artifex isn't shaped right.

Pensacola Tiger
01-24-2013, 11:28 AM
+1... It's the blade profile that causes this. It's not that it's just thinned behind the edge, it where the conveying begins and how much. You artifex isn't shaped right.

Can you give some specifics? The Artifex profile looks almost identical to the Hattori FH and the Aritsugu.

franzb69
01-24-2013, 11:35 AM
profile, geometry, thinness behind the edge.

taper from base of handle to tip.

James
01-24-2013, 12:06 PM
I think the profile is more similar to that of the masamoto vg. Geometry OTB is strongly convexed on both sides and thickness similar to classic wusthof's and henckel's.

chinacats
01-24-2013, 12:13 PM
I think the profile is more similar to that of the masamoto vg. Geometry OTB is strongly convexed on both sides and thickness similar to classic wusthof's and henckel's.

Yikes! Sounds thick!
:eek2:

Canadian
01-24-2013, 12:41 PM
I don't think laser or non laser matters. When cutting, I think the thinness behind the edge is what shows. My gengetsu and kochi both cut with less resistance then my suisin or tadatsuna cut.... Just my opinion but grind and thinness behind the edge both account for better ease of cutting then the thickness of the knife at the spine..

-Chuck


This is very true. Ask anybody who has cut with a Takeda or Shigefusa and they will say the same. IMO some level of thickness at the spine is agood thing in a chefs knife.

El Pescador
01-24-2013, 12:51 PM
Sorry to anyone who read this and thought that I was referring to the silhouette of the blade. What I meant was the the way the blade has been ground. Again, the convexity and shape as it aids in the cutting/releasing of food.

El Pescador
01-24-2013, 12:53 PM
Sorry to anyone who read this and thought that I was referring to the silhouette of the blade. What I meant was the the way the blade has been ground. Again, the convexity and shape as it aids in the cutting/releasing of food.

BTW, I have owned an Artifex and thought it was a great knife for the money.

Pensacola Tiger
01-24-2013, 12:58 PM
Sorry to anyone who read this and thought that I was referring to the silhouette of the blade. What I meant was the the way the blade has been ground. Again, the convexity and shape as it aids in the cutting/releasing of food.

Geometry rather than profile. I concur.

I picked up an Artifex to play with, but haven't had the time.

keithsaltydog
01-24-2013, 06:04 PM
I don't think laser or non laser matters. When cutting, I think the thinness behind the edge is what shows. My gengetsu and kochi both cut with less resistance then my suisin or tadatsuna cut.... Just my opinion but grind and thinness behind the edge both account for better ease of cutting then the thickness of the knife at the spine..

-Chuck

I agree thinness behind the edge a good taper fr. spine to edge road=ease of cutting.Thin Lazors excell in Fine Dineing,like protiens wraped in delicate crust or pako flakes.For those clean perfect cuts like a thin carbon lazor & a damp towel on the board.

tomsch
01-25-2013, 11:46 PM
I have a Artifex that I'm going to thin a little over the weekend. Seems to do OK at food release but I'm more interested in how well it can cut overall after the thinning. When slicing potatoes I use my custom Michael Kaiser that nothing sticks to. It's a rather thick blade but has a great taper that works well while not really being a delicate slicer.

http://i922.photobucket.com/albums/ad70/tomsch63/knives/DSC_8890.jpg

El Pescador
01-26-2013, 12:34 AM
I have a Artifex that I'm going to thin a little over the weekend. Seems to do OK at food release but I'm more interested in how well it can cut overall after the thinning. When slicing potatoes I use my custom Michael Kaiser that nothing sticks to. It's a rather thick blade but has a great taper that works well while not really being a delicate slicer.

http://i922.photobucket.com/albums/ad70/tomsch63/knives/DSC_8890.jpg

That's more of a deba.

stevenStefano
01-26-2013, 10:02 AM
Maybe it sounds like a cliche but a good knife is a good knife. I'd try some at opposite ends of the thickness scale and see which ones suit your cutting style and what you are cutting better. The 2 best cutting knives I've ever used, one was a laser and one was very thick, but they both cut great

tomsch
01-26-2013, 02:01 PM
The grind is more like a deba except it is a 50/50.


That's more of a deba.

Marko Tsourkan
01-26-2013, 07:10 PM
It's all in the grind, though the spine thickness matters if you cut tall dense stuff. Some knives will be thicker than some lasers, but will cut better and will have less flex. Lasers are not immune from food sticking.