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mano
02-04-2013, 09:18 AM
Shootings like Newtown, Chris Kyle, Columbine and others throughout the world are so rare and random they're essentially unpredictable.

Prediction of violence by the average psychiatrist and Ph.D. level psychologist is no better than chance.

Psychiatrists and psychologists who specialize in prediction of violence based on interviews and psychological testing have a prediction rate of only 70%.

The best predictor is a past history of violence. Many perpetrators of mass killings have little or no history. Some suffer from closed head injuries or other brain abnormalities (Charles Whitman 1966 University of Texas tower sniper had a brain tumor).

Emotional and mental illnesses that have agitation and aggression as diagnostic criteria range from regular depression and anxiety to PTSD, dementia, schizophrenia and severe personality disorders. Legally and ethically, mental health providers are prohibited to report patients as violent unless they're a clear threat to themselves or someone else.

These facts aren't meant to paint a hopeless picture, just putting things into perspective without any political or cultural bias.

ajhuff
02-04-2013, 09:57 AM
One thing my wife, she's a pediatrician, has brought up is that in many cases we have kids who are treated for depression or anxiety or mental disorders and that treatment is covered by insurance or most often Medicaid. Then they turn 18 and lose their coverage and no longer are receiving any treatment. Two years later they kill somebody and we we wonder why? This is a problem no one wants to diacuss.

-AJ

cwrightthruya
02-04-2013, 10:10 AM
One thing my wife, she's a pediatrician, has brought up is that in many cases we have kids who are treated for depression or anxiety or mental disorders and that treatment is covered by insurance or most often Medicaid. Then they turn 18 and lose their coverage and no longer are receiving any treatment. Two years later they kill somebody and we we wonder why? This is a problem no one wants to diacuss.

-AJ

This is very sad...very true...and to some extent largely dependent upon the state in which you are living as well as the condition you are diagnosed with. One of the large problems is that many times the diseases descirbed in the DSM pertain differently to children than to adults (although they have the same symptoms). For instance, NO-ONE under the age of 18 can be diagnosed with Antisocial Personality Disorder, so many children who may actually have APD are diagnosed with depression or other types of aggression syndrome. Then when they hit 18 they must go all the way back through the diagnosis process. This keeps from getting the medication they need to be stable and functional.

Regards,
Chris