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toddnmd
02-05-2013, 04:36 PM
I'm going to buy a Boardsmith board as a wedding present for a young couple. Leaning toward getting the board without the feet, so it can be used on two sides.

What do all of you think? Do you have feet on your board or not?

Jmadams13
02-05-2013, 04:41 PM
I don't use a board smith, but I love my homemade end grain without feet. I made it 2" thick so it has height to it, but finished it on both sides so I can flip it of it gets really dirty during prep, then wash it all at once when I'm done. Slipping problem solved with a peice of non stick shelf liner or a damp towel. I like the shelf liner better, as its thinner, and if I only use one side of the board, it can stay there.

IMO crumbs and crap gettin under the board in the small space left by the feet is annoying as hell

ThEoRy
02-05-2013, 04:45 PM
With. Last thing you need is moisture getting trapped underneath.....

echerub
02-05-2013, 04:49 PM
I like having the feet on my boards. When I ordered my boards, I debated whether or not to go with the feet. Now, though, I'll choose feet if they're available. It's convenient and makes it easy to quickly dry out the board after washing.

Not a must, I think, but certainly something that I have gotten to like quite a bit.

Johnny.B.Good
02-05-2013, 04:52 PM
I don't understand the desire to use both sides of a board.

You can only use one side at a time, and would never flip it over dirty, so what's the point?

The feet allow you to pick it up and move it easily too.

Dream Burls
02-05-2013, 04:55 PM
With. Last thing you need is moisture getting trapped underneath.....

I agree. And, if you keep it clean and moisturized with oil, one side is all you'll need. Feet also make it easier to pick up. If you have a large heavy board that definitely a plus. The extra height it gives could be a benefit too, especially if you're tall.

(JBG great minds think alike)

Blobby
02-05-2013, 05:28 PM
If it's a board that's going to more or less permanently occupy an area of bench space I'd definitely go for feet.

mr drinky
02-05-2013, 05:50 PM
I personally like boards without feet. I just put a sink mat underneath, and moisture has never been a problem. I have one with and one without, and I almost always go for the one without feet.

With that said, since this is a gift and you can't ensure how it will be treated over time, I would suggest one with feet. Just one thing to consider though is the height of the board and the people you are buying it for. If one or both of them are shorter, the feet do add some added height. My board with feet is almost three inches high. I would consider recessed feet to lower the board unless they are both tall and you know it isn't an issue.

k.

mr drinky
02-05-2013, 06:09 PM
I don't understand the desire to use both sides of a board.

You can only use one side at a time, and would never flip it over dirty, so what's the point?

The feet allow you to pick it up and move it easily too.

I often use both sides. If a protein contaminates one side during food prep, then I can wipe it off and flip it over if need be without taking it to the sink to wash it off. I'll wash it later when I have time. I usually use Dexas Fleximats on top of my board to reduce protein contamination, but sometimes it happens regardless. I'll also flip it sometimes after cutting spicy ingredients like peppers. It's not like I am flipping a nasty dirty board, it is just a matter of utility, timing, and wanting to segregate certain food prep.

k.

Benuser
02-05-2013, 06:58 PM
+1
I switch after cutting onions or garlic.

Zwiefel
02-05-2013, 07:05 PM
I often use both sides. If a protein contaminates one side during food prep, then I can wipe it off and flip it over if need be without taking it to the sink to wash it off. I'll wash it later when I have time. I usually use Dexas Fleximats on top of my board to reduce protein contamination, but sometimes it happens regardless. I'll also flip it sometimes after cutting spicy ingredients like peppers. It's not like I am flipping a nasty dirty board, it is just a matter of utility, timing, and wanting to segregate certain food prep.

k.

I currently keep separate boards for protein/veg for this reason...but they are inexpensive boards, I don't think I'd spring to two BoardSmiths for that purpose...I would reserve one side for each though (branded in opposite corners).

I thought someone on here posted that they had some kind of rubber feet they put on the counter, then flipped the board on top of that...have your cake and eat it too!

mr drinky
02-05-2013, 07:25 PM
I currently keep separate boards for protein/veg for this reason...but they are inexpensive boards, I don't think I'd spring to two BoardSmiths for that purpose...I would reserve one side for each though (branded in opposite corners). I'll use separate boards sometimes -- depends upon my tolerance for dishes, available space etc. I also have a poly board (yikes) that I put in a half sheet pan when I do a lot of chicken or turkey.

k.

Mike9
02-05-2013, 07:29 PM
No feet for me - I use both sides of mine. I've had it a while now and it needs a trip to the shop bot for flattening and a fresh oiling.

Zwiefel
02-05-2013, 07:33 PM
board put in a half sheet pan

That's a great idea...will be using that in the future!

tomsch
02-05-2013, 09:17 PM
I use both sides of my Boos but never really think about it since I have a non-slip mat that I cut to fit under the board. I really do love this board so not having feet is not a big deal.

chinacats
02-05-2013, 10:12 PM
My understanding has always been that you should store the board on it's side and not flat. Is that a misconception? If not, then I wouldn't really see the need for feet as it would likely lead people to leave the board flat rather than storing properly. If I am wrong (a very good possibility) then I may put some feet on mine and make them more permanent.

mr drinky
02-05-2013, 10:23 PM
I store all of mine on their side, and have never had a problem. Even if my smaller thin boards slightly warp, I just dry them, store them on their side and the next morning they are flat again.

k.

Blobby
02-05-2013, 10:54 PM
My understanding has always been that you should store the board on it's side and not flat. Is that a misconception? ..........

No, that's right. Any object made of wood should be stored in such a way that no one side is more exposed to elements than the other. If you want proof of that just place an off cut of almost any timber in any state of stability on your lawn on a reasonably sunny day and watch it curl up within hours/minutes.


If not, then I wouldn't really see the need for feet as it would likely lead people to leave the board flat rather than storing properly. If I am wrong (a very good possibility) then I may put some feet on mine and make them more permanent.

The reason feet are advocated is to increase the air flow beneath the board to ensure that the top and bottom are similarly exposed humidity wise. There is a chance if the underside is damp on more regular/permanent basis that the above scenario (curling up/cupping) could occur.

Another thing to consider is the fact that even the Boardsmith's smallest board would weigh quite a lot and is not something you want to handle on a regular basis. Of course it depends on the densities of the timbers he's using but being hardwoods they'd be up there. I made a couple of boards which get stored on edge. They're just over 1 1/2", the biggest is 11X14 and I wouldn't want it to weigh any more.

If I was buying a Boardsmith board I'd get a nice big one, dedicate bench space to it and have some feet put on it. If there was a maker simlarly priced in Western Australia I'd jump on it. Making it yourself is nice but without decent machinery it's a dusty nightmare of a job!

Johnny.B.Good
02-06-2013, 01:02 AM
I can understand the case for a board with no feet if you dedicate one side to proteins and one side to vegetables, but I always use one of those flexible plastic mats to protect my wooden board when cutting raw proteins, which I then put in the dishwasher. I have a separate carving board with a channel to collect juices for resting/slicing cooked proteins.

The feet on my mother's Boardsmith certainly add to the height of the board, and would be something to consider for a shorter person with tall counter tops. That said, the feet allow her to pick up and move the heavy board with relative ease (it lives on top of the counter top, but in an out of the way location further from the sink when not in use).

I guess there is no "right" answer to the question, as there are too many factors to consider (work habits in the kitchen, height of users, height of counter tops, space, etc.).

franzb69
02-06-2013, 01:24 AM
i don't have feet on my boards. i can just use a wet towel or wet paper towel underneath for support from slippage.

mpukas
02-06-2013, 01:55 AM
My main board is a Boos edge grain maple board 18x24x2-1/2 that lives on my counter - I've had it for about two years, and always used a gripper mat (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000MDD1HO/ref=oh_details_o09_s00_i00) underneath. My previous main board (which is now my travel board) is/was a Boos 14x18x1-1/2, and I did the same thing.

Just last week I put non-slip feet f/ Home Depot on them, and it's one of the single best things I ever did. Using the mat under the board was a PITA - the board would slide around because the mat is flexible, and if I wanted to move it, I had to pick up the board and move the mat underneath. Now with the feet, I can move as needed - small adjustments are often needed - and it doesn't slip. I also have tile counter tops - which SUCK, btw - and are not level, so with feet I can adjust the corners with fender washers and have a totally stable board.

I never use two sides of a board. I have at least two other boards that I use for dedicated tasks, both happen to be bamboo (hold overs from when I didn't know better, and I only slice on them, no chopping) and I put feet on them too. I have a 14x18x1 bamboo board for proteins and a smaller one for fruit only. Both of these board I sit on top of my main board, and I can run them in the sink to clean very easily. Now with feet on them, I don't have to dick around with a wet towel, and they sit flat and stable.

toddnmd
02-06-2013, 01:23 PM
Thanks for everyone's input. As someone mentioned, there is a lot to consider. I'm still leaning toward no feet (they're not that hard to add later), but some of you have shared some good ideas.

keithsaltydog
02-06-2013, 01:52 PM
I have a large boardsmith with feet.It is easier to move around when cleaning the counter.Also I think the air circulation on both sides is a good. I position it rt. on edge of counter so I can transfer prep into skillet or container.

Use separate board for Raw Protiens.I oil the boardsmith both sides & edges.Don't store it,have feeling this board is going to last a very long time.

Canadian
02-06-2013, 01:53 PM
Thanks for everyone's input. As someone mentioned, there is a lot to consider. I'm still leaning toward no feet (they're not that hard to add later), but some of you have shared some good ideas.

This is really quite trivial.

Feet keep the board off of the counter, which keeps it stable, clean and clear from any potential [liquid] spills.

It's a no brainer if you have the option to include feet.

Mr.Magnus
02-06-2013, 01:54 PM
i have with. i like it alot!

mr drinky
02-06-2013, 02:46 PM
This is really quite trivial.

Feet keep the board off of the counter, which keeps it stable, clean and clear from any potential [liquid] spills.

It's a no brainer if you have the option to include feet.

I will reiterate the sentiment of Johnny.B: it is really a personal preference at the end of the day. The only way you are wrong on this answer is if you feel there is only one right answer ;) Dig.

As for the OP, I would still recommend feet as this will not be your board and it would be easier to ensure others don't ruin it with moisture -- just as I recommend stainless steel to people who may not know how to maintain knives properly.

With that said, if you cook a lot and are 'minimally' capable, you should have no problem maintaining a board without feet and not have it warp. We who prefer no feet our boards, still rest our cutting surface on a mat of some sort, which gives it finger clearance to pick up easily, lets air in, and protects against spills etc. It's neither here nor there. I have both, and over time I have favored the board with no feet, but that's me.

k.

Johnny.B.Good
02-06-2013, 03:27 PM
We who prefer no feet our boards, ...

"Those people" as we with feet on our boards refer to you. ;)

Here is what the Boardsmith (http://www.theboardsmith.com/purchase.htm) himself has to say on the subject:

You use rubber tipped feet. Why? - The rubber tips do four things; absorb shocks when chopping, keep the board steady and stable during use, allow for easier handhold when moving and gives a space for air circulation to keep the underside dry.

Can I get a board without feet, double sided? - On request I will be happy to leave them off. However, during use you will need to put something under the board to keep it stable and extreme care must to be taken to make sure it isn't sitting in moisture while not being used.

I'm sure the newlyweds will be thrilled with the present, with feet or without!

keithsaltydog
02-06-2013, 05:00 PM
Thank's Johnny I printed his FAQ page,leave it in a Kitchen drawer for Papers.

toddnmd
02-07-2013, 08:25 AM
This is really quite trivial.

Feet keep the board off of the counter, which keeps it stable, clean and clear from any potential [liquid] spills.

It's a no brainer if you have the option to include feet.

Hmmm, I'm not so sure. Depends somewhat on the situation.

I have a 15 x 20 Boos board. It doesn't have permanent counter space--I keep it on the edge at the back of the counter when I'm not using it. It also has finger grooves, so that helps with moving it back and forth.

I can see the benefits of the rubber feet, but I can also see situations where they're less desirable. It has certainly been helpful to hear various opinions about the factors that should be considered in the decision. I would guess that the majority of boards out there don't have feet.

Duckfat
02-07-2013, 09:34 AM
No feet. They put holes in your board and for most users that means you have half as much cutting board. Boards should be stored on their sides. I'd much rather buy a 3" thick board instead of a thinner board with feet but clearly this is very subjective and just a matter of personal preference. I can't say I've ever seen feet on a cutting board in a commercial kitchen. A board with out feet should be far more stable than one with feet. Any time you can spread the weight of a board over the entire area Vs four small points to me that's a no-brainer.

shankster
02-07-2013, 10:55 AM
Another vote for with feet,especially if it's going to be a permanent fixture on a counter top.

Canadian
02-07-2013, 11:31 AM
Hmmm, I'm not so sure. Depends somewhat on the situation.

I have a 15 x 20 Boos board. It doesn't have permanent counter space--I keep it on the edge at the back of the counter when I'm not using it. It also has finger grooves, so that helps with moving it back and forth.

I can see the benefits of the rubber feet, but I can also see situations where they're less desirable. It has certainly been helpful to hear various opinions about the factors that should be considered in the decision. I would guess that the majority of boards out there don't have feet.

Huh? Mine has feet and finger grooves and I also store it on its side to save counter space--I don't see how that is relavent?

It's not difficult to test though. Just get one without feet, buy some stick on rubber feet and try it out. If you don't like it take them off--voila!

If you want something more permanent install them yourself.

Mr.Magnus
02-07-2013, 11:37 AM
just ask him if you can have the feet loose with the board and let the new owner deside if he wanna put them on or not.
Ikea Style for the WIN ! :)

Zwiefel
02-07-2013, 11:42 AM
just ask him if you can have the feet loose with the board and let the new owner deside if he wanna put them on or not.
Ikea Style for the WIN ! :)

:justkidding: Perfect.

toddnmd
02-07-2013, 02:59 PM
Good point, Duckfat. I hadn't thought about the weight distribution issue. It might not matter all that much, but something to think about.

toddnmd
02-07-2013, 03:03 PM
Huh? Mine has feet and finger grooves and I also store it on its side to save counter space--I don't see how that is relavent?

It's not difficult to test though. Just get one without feet, buy some stick on rubber feet and try it out. If you don't like it take them off--voila!

If you want something more permanent install them yourself.

One argument for feet is that it provides space underneath, making it easier to pick up. That's less of an issue if there are finger grooves.

I agree that it's quite simple to get the board without feet and add them later if the owners feel like they're really needed.

boomchakabowwow
02-07-2013, 03:11 PM
no feet here.

i use a kitchen towel for stability..and i like the option of flipping the board over for two times the lifespan. (i have yet to wear one out)

Canadian
02-07-2013, 04:19 PM
no feet here.

i use a kitchen towel for stability..and i like the option of flipping the board over for two times the lifespan. (i have yet to wear one out)

It's not twice the lifespan. If you want to refresh the board you can take a belt sander to it--you would have to do this even if you used both sides.

Marko Tsourkan
02-07-2013, 04:22 PM
Absolutely with feet. I don't want to repeat myself, but I have listed more than one reasons in another thread.

M

rahimlee54
02-07-2013, 04:46 PM
Feet, for the reasons listed in the thread.

I have never had weight distribution related problems with my board from David.

mr drinky
02-07-2013, 04:50 PM
Absolutely with feet. I don't want to repeat myself, but I have listed more than one reasons in another thread.

M

I know, I know, Marko, I have heard it before. I remember. And do I have to repeat myself that it depends upon one's preference, food prep habits, space, etc ;) For most people it is best with feet, but some may prefer it without.

This is the last I will say on boards in this thread or ever again probably, but if you are able to reasonably take care of your stones and knives, then it is seriously easy to maintain a board without feet. You simply put a breathable matt underneath it.

I'm done.

k.

keithsaltydog
02-07-2013, 05:23 PM
It's cool Drinky,Never had feet on boards at work or home boards for that matter.On my large boardsmith tho I like em.:D

boomchakabowwow
02-07-2013, 06:27 PM
It's not twice the lifespan. If you want to refresh the board you can take a belt sander to it--you would have to do this even if you used both sides.

ok, twice the life between sanding? ;)

never thought we would see five pages on a woodblock. :)

Deckhand
02-08-2013, 12:27 AM
I have a Boardsmith board with feet and I am very happy with it that way.

eaglerock
02-08-2013, 12:57 AM
I prefer feet too but i have some that sticks under the board without screws.

Canadian
02-08-2013, 01:57 AM
Why is this thread 5 pages long...? :scratchhead: