PDA

View Full Version : The best three knives for a paleo mama



Muppet
02-13-2013, 11:11 AM
Hello and thank you for helping a newbie. Soooo I have finally learned to cook after 40 somewhat years and I would like to upgrade my Costco Henkel knives. From what I have read and experienced it seems I really only need three knives - a good paring knife, a good chef knife and a good slicer. So I am looking for recommendations - budget is about $300-500 total. I eat a lot of meat and vegetables (we eat paleo...).

I would love to educate myself more on this forum but with two little ones I just don't have the time. So again, thank you!

Zwiefel
02-13-2013, 11:18 AM
Welcome to KKF! Many folks here will be able to help with recommendations. I'd recommend you answer these questions to get the best advice for you:

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/2058-Which-knife-should-you-buy

franzb69
02-13-2013, 11:19 AM
please answer this questionaire:

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/2058-Which-knife-should-you-buy

i would also like to include these two questions:

how do you store your knives?

what kind of cutting board do you use? wood? plastic? glass? stone?

Muppet
02-13-2013, 11:31 AM
!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

What type of knife(s) do you think you want? Sharp, sexy knives. Knives that say "semi-pro" and "she must know what she is doing"

Why is it being purchased? What, if anything, are you replacing? Replacing Costco Henkel knives. Too many knives, not enough quality

What do you like and dislike about these qualities of your knives already?
Aesthetics- ehhhh....not sexy
Edge Quality/Retention-...minimal
Ease of Use-ok
Comfort-minimal

What grip do you use? The one Julia Childs teaches - thumb and pointer finger squeezing blade (if you know of a better one, please educate me).

What kind of cutting motion do you use? Not sure how to answer this.

Where do you store them? On a magnetic strip

Have you ever oiled a handle? No

What kind of cutting board(s) do you use? Bamboo

For edge maintenance, do you use a strop, honing rod, pull through/other, or nothing? Nothing, but I can learn

Have they ever been sharpened?yes

What is your budget? $300-500 though cheaper is better

What do you cook and how often? I cook twice a day. We eat paleo so meats and vegetables

Special requests(Country of origin/type of wood/etc)?

El Pescador
02-13-2013, 11:40 AM
Types...probably a gyuto and a petty, maybe a parer.
Brands Suisin, Hattori, Masamoto. All make stainless options.

chinacats
02-13-2013, 11:54 AM
Greetings!

Had to look up paleo diet to know what you were talking about, sounds like it would be good for a knife knut! People will chime in shortly, but the terms may be a bit confusing; gyuto will be used to refer to a chef's knife, sujihiki will be the same as slicer. For your budget you can get some great replacements. As to sharpening, most here are proponents of doing it yourself--a small investment in stones and effort will yield the sharpest knives you or your friends have ever used--and any issues can be worked through with help when you have questions.

Do you like a heavy or lighter knife (guessing that your Henckels are fairly light if they are from Costco)? Do you want a traditional western handle or would you be comfortable trying a wa (usually octagonal, round or D-shaped)?

Finally, where you are located? If you are lucky, you may be near a shop where you can at least try out some handles and get a good idea for length you would prefer. FYI, most J-knives will be measured in mm, so the general size for a gyuto will be either 210 or 240 while the sujihiki will likely be 240-270 depending on preference.

Cheers!

cnochef
02-13-2013, 12:15 PM
I think it's also important to not think just in terms of knives you want, but of your overall "cutting system". If you buy quality Japanese knives, you need to think about an appropriate cutting board, a least a Japanese combination sharpening stone and a sharpening instructional DVD. Budget for them appropriately. Buying 4 good quality Japanese knives (chef's or "gyuto", slicer or "sujihiki", utility or "petty" and a parer) from Tojiro DP or Fujiwara FKM (both excellent brands to begin with) will cost you about $280. A good quality 2"x12"x18" maple cutting board from www.theboardsmith.com will be $115 shipped. A combination 1000/6000 grit Japanese sharpening stone and instructional DVD is about $100 from www.japaneseknifesharpening.com (the owner of this forum, Dave Martell, incidentally). The online retailer for the knife brands can be easily found using Google.

BTW if you do a lot of boning out of your own meat, you might consider a Japanese boning knife "honesuki" instead of the utility knife.

Welcome to the insanity and Good Luck with your initial purchases!

ThEoRy
02-13-2013, 01:05 PM
Starting off you need:
Gyuto 210mm-240mm
Petty 150mm
Pairing 65mm-105mm

Maybe Suisin Western Inox is a good place to start?

After that, maybe think about the tojiro itk bread knife.

Of course you have to consider stones for maintenance as well.

El Pescador
02-13-2013, 01:10 PM
Starting off you need:
Gyuto 210mm-240mm
Petty 150mm
Pairing 65mm-105mm

Maybe Suisin Western Inox is a good place to start?

After that, maybe think about the tojiro itk bread knife.

Of course you have to consider stones for maintenance as well.

I like this. Keep it simple.

chinacats
02-13-2013, 01:31 PM
Starting off you need:
Gyuto 210mm-240mm
Petty 150mm
Pairing 65mm-105mm

Maybe Suisin Western Inox is a good place to start?

After that, maybe think about the tojiro itk bread knife.

Of course you have to consider stones for maintenance as well.

+1 to the Suisin, but paleo is no bread so she can skip the bread knife and instead maybe buy a combination stone.

Chefdog
02-13-2013, 01:33 PM
Starting off you need:
Gyuto 210mm-240mm
Petty 150mm
Pairing 65mm-105mm

Maybe Suisin Western Inox is a good place to start?

After that, maybe think about the tojiro itk bread knife.

Of course you have to consider stones for maintenance as well.

Ill offer a slightly different opinion.
I agree with the 210-240 gyuto, unless you have very limited space, the 240 will be better once you're used to it.
I also agree with the paring/petty suggestion, I think +\- 100mm is perfect.
BUT, I've never found the 150 petty to be a very useful knife. IMO, it's kind of in no-man's-land. Too big for most peeling, paring tasks, and not enough blade length for any real slicing tasks. I feel like the paring and gyuto can cover any job the 150 petty can do, and do most of them more efficiently.
Instead, I'd suggest going with ThEory's other suggestion of the ITK bread knife. It excels at breads (obviously) and, because of its scalloped vs serrated edge, it does quite a good job as a slicer for all of your roasts, chicken breasts, brisket, etc.
:2cents:

And an inexpensive boning knife like is a good idea too. I have one of these and it's quite good for the money:
http://epicedge.com/shopexd.asp?id=83710

Good luck

Pensacola Tiger
02-13-2013, 02:03 PM
Welcome to KKF!

You really only need two knives.

Suisin Inox 3 1/4" paring - http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/suisin/suisin-inox-western/suisin-inox-western-80mm-paring-knife.html

Suisin Inox 8 1/4" gyuto (chef's) - http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/suisin/suisin-inox-western/suisin-inox-western-210mm-gyuto.html

95% of everything you will do in a paleo kitchen can be done with those two knives.

The remainder of your budget needs to go to a good end grain cutting board and a medium grit waterstone.

Rick

bear1889
02-13-2013, 02:05 PM
Go to Japanese knife imports here at the forum, Jon and Sarah are the best. For a custom I recommend Del Ealy here too.

tk59
02-13-2013, 02:08 PM
Welcome to KKF!

You really only need two knives.

Suisin Inox 3 1/4" paring - http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/suisin/suisin-inox-western/suisin-inox-western-80mm-paring-knife.html

Suisin Inox 8 1/4" gyuto (chef's) - http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/suisin/suisin-inox-western/suisin-inox-western-210mm-gyuto.html

95% of everything you will do in a paleo kitchen can be done with those two knives.

The remainder of your budget needs to go to a good end grain cutting board and a medium grit waterstone.

Rick
+1 for the other 5%, you want a hatchet.

Lefty
02-13-2013, 02:24 PM
+1 for the other 5%, you want a hatchet.

She already has a set, from Costco, remember? :D

ThEoRy
02-13-2013, 02:35 PM
The petty is suggested really for poultry boning, tenderloins, even small fruits and veggies on the board. I would suggest the honesuki for a more advanced/adventurist user but the petty is a less specialized shape.

jimbob
02-13-2013, 02:46 PM
Gyuto being most important, there is a hattori fh 240 stainless in bst going for 220 which leaves ample room for a parer and maybe a 1000/4000 combo stone, board, sharpening DVD etc. it is a great knife, I got one after asking similar questions not long ago and am suitably impressed.

bear1889
02-13-2013, 02:49 PM
+1 for the other 5%, you want a hatchet.

Oh that reminds me, one other thing for a home kitchen I can recommend is good pair of game shears they're great for cutting up a chicken, I don't like using knives for that when I am in a hurry, I have great pair from Kershaw, which they probably don't make anymore.

El Pescador
02-13-2013, 03:51 PM
Ill offer a slightly different opinion.
I agree with the 210-240 gyuto, unless you have very limited space, the 240 will be better once you're used to it.
I also agree with the paring/petty suggestion, I think +\- 100mm is perfect.
BUT, I've never found the 150 petty to be a very useful knife. IMO, it's kind of in no-man's-land. Too big for most peeling, paring tasks, and not enough blade length for any real slicing tasks. I feel like the paring and gyuto can cover any job the 150 petty can do, and do most of them more efficiently.
Instead, I'd suggest going with ThEory's other suggestion of the ITK bread knife. It excels at breads (obviously) and, because of its scalloped vs serrated edge, it does quite a good job as a slicer for all of your roasts, chicken breasts, brisket, etc.
:2cents:

And an inexpensive boning knife like is a good idea too. I have one of these and it's quite good for the money:
http://epicedge.com/shopexd.asp?id=83710

Good luck

IF she's on the paleo diet she doesn't need a bread knife.

Muppet
02-13-2013, 03:52 PM
You are all awesome! I am so appreciating all these suggestions! I am in Phoenix, AZ. I don't know what my handle preference is. I have skinny hands with long fingers. All I know is I am tired at sawing away at my carrots!

Pensacola Tiger
02-13-2013, 03:59 PM
You are all awesome! I am so appreciating all these suggestions! I am in Phoenix, AZ. I don't know what my handle preference is. I have skinny hands with long fingers. All I know is I am tired at sawing away at my carrots!

Carrots?? Carrots aren't food, they're what food eats!

Zwiefel
02-13-2013, 04:04 PM
You are all awesome! I am so appreciating all these suggestions! I am in Phoenix, AZ. I don't know what my handle preference is. I have skinny hands with long fingers. All I know is I am tired at sawing away at my carrots!

I know others here disagree with me, but in practice I don't find there to be a heck of a difference between Japanese (wa-) and Western (yo-) handled knives in terms of your experience using them...I just like the aesthetics of wa- better and prefer them for that reason alone.

ThEoRy
02-13-2013, 04:04 PM
Pigs turn carrots into bacon.. Magical.

ThEoRy
02-13-2013, 04:05 PM
I know others here disagree with me, but in practice I don't find there to be a heck of a difference between Japanese (wa-) and Western (yo-) handled knives in terms of your experience using them...I just like the aesthetics of wa- better and prefer them for that reason alone.


Weight, balance.

don
02-13-2013, 04:18 PM
You are all awesome! I am so appreciating all these suggestions! I am in Phoenix, AZ. I don't know what my handle preference is. I have skinny hands with long fingers. All I know is I am tired at sawing away at my carrots!

I'm pro getting new knives, but have you sharpened your Costco Henkels? Noticed that you said that you currently don't maintain the knives. With these knives, you should hone before each use. And then after a while, you'll need to sharpen.

Zwiefel
02-13-2013, 04:41 PM
Weight, balance.

Good point Rick...esp for a given knife with yo vs wa. Of course, with the many choices out there, one can practically get any combination one wants.

Justin0505
02-13-2013, 04:52 PM
I'm going to back way up here and say start with just 1 new knife: the gyuto.
If you're starting relatively flesh and you're cooking for a growing family, then get something 240mm long.
To see what 1 good knife, some focus/ practice on technique, and of course dubstep will get you, just watch some of our own Theory's(pcckitchen) videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPiz6Aaa7Eg&feature=youtube_gdata_player

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPiz6Aaa7Eg&feature=youtube_gdata_player
Practice is a big part of it, but its as much about thinking and planning your work/cuts as anything.

Once you get used to it, the extra length will come in handy and will make it work well as a slicer. If you master your gyuto skills, you might not ever NEED a petty, paring, or slicer. And honestly for as little as a paring knife would get used in Paelo cooking (not much fruit), you can probably get by with what you have just fine. You money will get better value in a gyuto that you really love, a couple decent stones, and a nice big cutting board.

There are good stainless steels out there, but if you can discipline yourself to give it a little extra care (dont put it away wet), carbon steel will give you a better cost/performance ratio, will make learning to sharpen easier and, IMO fits with the whole paleo mentality and also your desire to look like a bada$$.

One feature that will help with comfort is a rounded spine and choil, with a couple clamps, sand paper, and elbow grease, you can do it yourself, but some knives come with the extra finishing work already done.

Anything that you get from Japaneseknifeimports.com, or korin will be excellent quality. Spend some time looking at pictures and then give them a call.

Lastly, as others have mentioned, the best way to get peak performance out of your new toy is to learn how to keep it sharp / make it sharp yourself. The factory edge will last for awhile, so use that time to learn /practice sharpening on the old Costcos.

El Pescador
02-13-2013, 05:16 PM
I'm going to back way up here and say start with just 1 new knife: the gyuto...

Got to agree. A lot of good advice here, but the divergence always seems to take place after the gyuto recommendation. Everyone has different opinions on manufacturer or length, but are consistent with the recommendations for a gyuto. As a pro, I did 90% of my job with one. As a home cook, I do 99% of my cutting with one.

Rosco
02-13-2013, 06:13 PM
I have recently started eating paleo (Jan this year), and even more recently joined this forum so I don't know as that much about knives yet, but I have to agree with Justin here. I pretty much only use a chefs knife in the kitchen. I have only ever used my parer for peeling fruit, so you can decide whether you need one of those or not. The chefs knife gets used for almost all food prep. My opinion on utility knives for the home cook (like me), is that on the few occasions when they might be the best tool for the job, it's actually still easier to just use your chefs knife because you are so accustomed to using it. The only other things I can think of that would be useful is a boning knife/honesuki if you want to bone your own poultry or a Deba if you want to prep whole fish. If you roast joints of meat a lot a carving knife and fork might be useful, but the chefs knife would fill this role quite adequately as well.
Chefs knife could be a Gyuto which is much like the standard french chefs knife, but with a flatter profile and less curve. It could be a santoku, which is flatter still, or it could even be a Chinese cleaver. I have listed the basic types of chefs knives in order of popularity with the gyuto being the winner by a country mile. Most people seem to prefer the 240mm length but beginners often think this is too long and opt for 210mm. I believe many/most of the people who start out with the 210mm eventually decide to go with the 240mm anyway.
So, buy a chefs knife, an endgrain chopping board (much easier on your knives. edges will last longer), and learn how to sharpen.

chinacats
02-13-2013, 08:27 PM
You are all awesome! I am so appreciating all these suggestions! I am in Phoenix, AZ. I don't know what my handle preference is. I have skinny hands with long fingers. All I know is I am tired at sawing away at my carrots!

Only a 6 hour drive from JKI in Venice! I would suggest calling Jon who is the shop proprietor (and fellow forum member)--he is most knowledgeable and will not try to sell you something you do not need (he's even been known to downsell people). Armed with the good advice you've received from others so far and what you already know, you should be able to get something that will make you very happy!

Cheers!

oh, maybe this will help
http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/

Chefdog
02-14-2013, 01:22 AM
IF she's on the paleo diet she doesn't need a bread knife.

Yeah, i must admit I had to google it to figure out what it was, and by then it was too late to edit.
But if it means no pizza AND no croissant, I can't even fathom it:pullhair:

ThEoRy
02-14-2013, 01:31 AM
I'm going to back way up here and say start with just 1 new knife: the gyuto.
If you're starting relatively flesh and you're cooking for a growing family, then get something 240mm long.
To see what 1 good knife, some focus/ practice on technique, and of course dubstep will get you, just watch some of our own Theory's(pcckitchen) videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPiz6Aaa7Eg&feature=youtube_gdata_player

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPiz6Aaa7Eg&feature=youtube_gdata_player
Practice is a big part of it, but its as much about thinking and planning your work/cuts as anything.

Once you get used to it, the extra length will come in handy and will make it work well as a slicer. If you master your gyuto skills, you might not ever NEED a petty, paring, or slicer. And honestly for as little as a paring knife would get used in Paelo cooking (not much fruit), you can probably get by with what you have just fine. You money will get better value in a gyuto that you really love, a couple decent stones, and a nice big cutting board.

There are good stainless steels out there, but if you can discipline yourself to give it a little extra care (dont put it away wet), carbon steel will give you a better cost/performance ratio, will make learning to sharpen easier and, IMO fits with the whole paleo mentality and also your desire to look like a bada$$.

One feature that will help with comfort is a rounded spine and choil, with a couple clamps, sand paper, and elbow grease, you can do it yourself, but some knives come with the extra finishing work already done.

Anything that you get from Japaneseknifeimports.com, or korin will be excellent quality. Spend some time looking at pictures and then give them a call.

Lastly, as others have mentioned, the best way to get peak performance out of your new toy is to learn how to keep it sharp / make it sharp yourself. The factory edge will last for awhile, so use that time to learn /practice sharpening on the old Costcos.

Classic. The Michael Rader 10" beast. Had a lot of fun with that knife.

chinacats
02-14-2013, 02:03 AM
Classic. The Michael Rader 10" beast. Had a lot of fun with that knife.

??:nono:

What would make you sell that knife? Looked to be a killer!

ThEoRy
02-14-2013, 02:20 AM
It was a passaround. Had it for about 10 working days.

ChiliPepper
02-14-2013, 05:31 AM
Lots of great info already in this thread just want to underline the concept of simplicity: I would suggest you get a gyuto (stainless for starting) of your preferred length and a small, solid petty (say 130mm) that will also work for boning. Then get a waterstone (more experienced users here will be able to suggest a good one) and practice, practice, practice. One of the most important things I learned in these forums is that what will give you the best satisfaction is using a SHARP knife and a very good and expensive knife that you can't mantain will not be as fun.You'll get there eventually.Hope this helps! :)

Muppet
02-14-2013, 12:15 PM
Alright you wonderful people, so after I get my knife...what is the best way to learn how to sharpen? My old Henkels look like a great place to start learning.... Videos? Tools? Should I start a new thread?

And I love the look of the recommended cutting boards! Thank you for your help! I shall go eat a hunk of dead animal in your honor!

mhatt
02-14-2013, 12:36 PM
If in Phoenix, you might check out Phoenix Knife house. They hand sharpen too. Might be the only local option vs. big box retailers and have some more unique things.

Lucretia
02-14-2013, 12:42 PM
Do you have a knife store nearby where you can handle some knives? I know most folks here say get a 240, but I love my shorter knives. Cooking for 2 with very limited counter space, I mostly use my 180s while the 210 mainly gets used as a slicer. If I had more counter space, I might use the 210 more, but don't know that I'd need a 240. I like a shorter utility knife for a second knife--in the 135 range for a petty/utility. My paring knives don't get used as much, but my favorite parer is also short and stubby. If you can find a place where you can handle different knives, it's really helpful. Balance, weight, a differently shaped handle--all affect how the knife fits your hand and your style.

And if the knife you get turns out not to be the perfect one for you, it's not the end of the world. You can sell it and try another one.

chinacats
02-14-2013, 12:45 PM
Alright you wonderful people, so after I get my knife...what is the best way to learn how to sharpen? My old Henkels look like a great place to start learning.... Videos? Tools? Should I start a new thread?

And I love the look of the recommended cutting boards! Thank you for your help! I shall go eat a hunk of dead animal in your honor!

If you want to use an online resource, Jon (same guy from JKI) has as youtube channel that is awesome: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEBF55079F53216AB&feature=plcp
If you prefer a dvd then this sites owner Dave has a sharpening dvd that also comes highly recommended: https://www.japaneseknifesharpeningstore.com/
Both sell very high quality stones as well.
Cheers!

Justin0505
02-16-2013, 09:00 PM
+1!!


If you want to use an online resource, Jon (same guy from JKI) has as youtube channel that is awesome: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEBF55079F53216AB&feature=plcp
If you prefer a dvd then this sites owner Dave has a sharpening dvd that also comes highly recommended: https://www.japaneseknifesharpeningstore.com/
Both sell very high quality stones as well.
Cheers!

Dave even has a "core" or started set of stone: pretty killer deal with all the guess work already taken out of it:
http://www.japaneseknifesharpeningstore.com/Dave-Martell-set-sharpening-stones-p/set1dmcore.htm

Jon's youtube videos will give you at least enough information to get started.

Once you get the hang of sharpening and get your old Henkels properly thinned behind the edge and sharp, it will be like a different knife. -Certainly better than when it was new. You could actually get the stones and start sharpening while you are still deciding on your new knife / waiting for it to arrive.

Kumar
02-16-2013, 11:48 PM
Maybe I missed it, but which knife/knives did you decide to get?

Muppet
05-22-2013, 09:51 AM
I should be getting my knives soon! I just got my board from the Boardsmith two days go. You can see it here http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/12181-Just-Completed
It's the second board and beautiful.
I have the stone sharpening kit and DVD coming and as for knives, I spoke to John and got the Gesshin Uraku 150mm and 210mm

Now I just have to figure out how to keep my husband from using the Henkels on my new board!
http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/gesshin-uraku/gesshin-uraku-150mm-stainless-wa-petty.html
http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/gesshin-uraku/gesshin-uraku-210mm-stainless-wa-gyuto.html

Benuser
05-22-2013, 10:03 AM
Now I just have to figure out how to keep my husband from using the Henkels on my new board!

Why would you?

Muppet
05-22-2013, 10:30 AM
My Henkels are just bad. I lost the honed so they are rolled. And my husband has put them in the dishwasher a few times without me knowing so they are pitted. And I don't want to tear up the new board. I do 110 percent of the cooking in the family

Slypig5000
05-22-2013, 10:58 AM
I should be getting my knives soon! I just got my board from the Boardsmith two days go. You can see it here http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/12181-Just-Completed
It's the second board and beautiful.
I have the stone sharpening kit and DVD coming and as for knives, I spoke to John and got the Gesshin Uraku 150mm and 210mm

Now I just have to figure out how to keep my husband from using the Henkels on my new board!
http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/gesshin-uraku/gesshin-uraku-150mm-stainless-wa-petty.html
http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/gesshin-uraku/gesshin-uraku-210mm-stainless-wa-gyuto.html

You are starting out at great place with these knives/stones/board. People come here from all different walks, which makes this forum really awesome. I too am a home cook and much more competent in the kitchen after watching/studying Theory's and Salty's videos. Your Henckels are a great place to learn how to sharpen, it won't be exactly the same as your new knives, but you can learn the technique without damaging some nice cutlery.

Muppet
05-22-2013, 11:16 AM
That was what I was planning on doing! Use the Henkels to practice so I won't feel bad when I make my mistakes

Marko Tsourkan
05-22-2013, 01:36 PM
A little off topic, but I have been on 100% Paleo second week (85% Paleo for couple of months before that). We have a Palleo challenge at the gym, and I aim at winning it. Eating 100% Paleo has been the easiest, and get 8+ hours of sleep per night, the hardest.

My go to knives to prepare my Paleo meals are 180mm chef and 225mm chef.



M

Muppet
05-22-2013, 07:51 PM
If I could I would get ten hours of sleep a night. But alas, two kids make that impossible. I find eating paleo really helps my kids though because they don't have processed carbs to fill up on. And it helps me. Along with knives, my other metal fun has been learning kettlebells

Marko Tsourkan
05-22-2013, 08:05 PM
... Along with knives, my other metal fun has been learning kettlebells

Love kettlebells. Can have them every day along with sweet potatoes. :D

RRLOVER
05-22-2013, 09:28 PM
I have been 99.9% paleo for 3.5 months.....I have a Nakiri sitting on my boardsmith and have not really needed much else.

Marko Tsourkan
05-23-2013, 08:24 AM
I have been 99.9% paleo for 3.5 months.....I have a Nakiri sitting on my boardsmith and have not really needed much else.

What do you cut you meat with?

dannynyc
05-23-2013, 12:14 PM
Lots of great info already in this thread just want to underline the concept of simplicity: I would suggest you get a gyuto (stainless for starting) of your preferred length and a small, solid petty (say 130mm) that will also work for boning. Then get a waterstone (more experienced users here will be able to suggest a good one) and practice, practice, practice. One of the most important things I learned in these forums is that what will give you the best satisfaction is using a SHARP knife and a very good and expensive knife that you can't mantain will not be as fun.You'll get there eventually.Hope this helps! :)

+1 gyuto + petty. That is all you will need but I do think the petty is very handy for smaller/fine tasks where a gyuto can feel too cumbersome (e.g. splitting small cherry tomatoes). I have a 125mm petty and I use it a lot. I also highly recommend a 240mm gyuto, it may sound big now but will feel very normal very soon.

Marko Tsourkan
05-23-2013, 01:13 PM
+1 gyuto + petty. That is all you will need but I do think the petty is very handy for smaller/fine tasks where a gyuto can feel too cumbersome (e.g. splitting small cherry tomatoes). I have a 125mm petty and I use it a lot. I also highly recommend a 240mm gyuto, it may sound big now but will feel very normal very soon.

Since I started using 180mm chef, a petty became a redundant knife, as I can do everything a petty can do with 180mm. Thanks to Steve Cipcich for enlightening me. I didn't think much of that size back then.

I use 240-270mm for preparing larger meals where edge length required, but not that often. 180mm and 225mm are my go-to knives, and I cook every day, three meals a day.

M

dannynyc
05-24-2013, 10:06 AM
Since I started using 180mm chef, a petty became a redundant knife, as I can do everything a petty can do with 180mm. Thanks to Steve Cipcich for enlightening me. I didn't think much of that size back then.

I use 240-270mm for preparing larger meals where edge length required, but not that often. 180mm and 225mm are my go-to knives, and I cook every day, three meals a day.

M

I guess I'd concur if I was using a 180mm gyuto. I use a 240 or 270 more most tasks, hence the occasional need for a petty.