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View Full Version : NEed advice about Deba knife for sushi bar.



gentlecook
02-20-2013, 07:37 AM
Holla guys!

desperately need good knife to filleting salmon on sushi-bar.
decided ask it to Chefs from KKF =)

now i carve salmons with cheap thick SS yanagi.

looking for ~210-240 mioroshi Deba or 180-210 original Deba.
mioroshi is more maneuverable, but Deba has a better edge retention and longer life reserve.

what can you advise me from a real personal experience with Deba vs Salmons?

thanks

Chefdog
02-20-2013, 07:58 AM
I always give the same recommendation for this type question,
Suisin Western Carbon Yo-Deba: http://korin.com/Suisin-High-Carbon-Steel-Yo-Deba?sc=27&category=280062
Obviously, not a traditional single bevel knife, but a very durable blade that easily takes a nice edge. I've had one for probably 10 years and it'll last another 10 at least. It will certainly handle salmon with ease, and is also quite versatile compared to a traditional deba, if that matters to you. If you're not 100% set on a single bevel, try one, you won't be dissapointed. If you are set on single bevel, forget I even posted :tease:

franzb69
02-20-2013, 08:00 AM
theory could chime in on this as he works with a large mioroshi deba

gentlecook
02-20-2013, 08:05 AM
yep, interesting single bevel deba ofc.

this yo-deba is just a thick gyuto )

cookinstuff
02-20-2013, 11:42 AM
Wow, I just posted this exact statement two minutes ago on a fish/filet post. I use a 240 mioroshi which is almost a suji now, and I enjoy it's length for taking salmon filets off, and for skinning it has enough length. I get some really big salmons up here, so no way a 210 will skin one. I use a 220 pierre filet for removing belly bones and other fishy stuff. My favourite combo for salmon and one I won't consider changing until I need a new deba, at which point I will probably just get a new 240 mioroshi, thinking Shigefusa, Watanabe, or maybe one of those sexy Suisin Inox Honyaki that Jon has, they are a bit shiny for me though. So, I would suggest the 240 mioroshi if you are looking for one specific salmon knife, you could lop it's head off if you koba the heel, filet it, skin it and portion it without switching knives. I'm sure a 180 deba will filet a salmon nicer most likely, but start to finish the mioroshi will do a good job and you won't need two knives. I think Theory uses a 270, which I would think would be even better, but 270 are uncommon, he probably got his custom.

mhlee
02-20-2013, 11:57 AM
FWIW, several Japanese fish cutting books I've seen and purchased instruct cutting salmon using a yanagiba.

gentlecook
02-20-2013, 03:34 PM
Wow, I just posted this exact statement two minutes ago on a fish/filet post. I use a 240 mioroshi which is almost a suji now, and I enjoy it's length for taking salmon filets off, and for skinning it has enough length. I get some really big salmons up here, so no way a 210 will skin one. I use a 220 pierre filet for removing belly bones and other fishy stuff. My favourite combo for salmon and one I won't consider changing until I need a new deba, at which point I will probably just get a new 240 mioroshi, thinking Shigefusa, Watanabe, or maybe one of those sexy Suisin Inox Honyaki that Jon has, they are a bit shiny for me though. So, I would suggest the 240 mioroshi if you are looking for one specific salmon knife, you could lop it's head off if you koba the heel, filet it, skin it and portion it without switching knives. I'm sure a 180 deba will filet a salmon nicer most likely, but start to finish the mioroshi will do a good job and you won't need two knives. I think Theory uses a 270, which I would think would be even better, but 270 are uncommon, he probably got his custom.

ty for advice!

actually for filleting from skin i have suji.
i thought about it and decided that Mioroshi - not for me.

deba - correct and reliable kitchen tool, and its cool.

ThEoRy
02-20-2013, 07:10 PM
I really do love using the 270 mioroshi on salmon, I's just a wonderful tool. Lops heads, fillets, skins, portions or slices all in one tool. Something to be said for that for sure. That being said, my 210 deba is surely no slouch either. You can still skin the bigger salmon with no problem too. It's not the most elegant tool for portioning but does an admirable job none the less. The only thing really lacking is the slicing department obviously. What specifically are you looking for and how much are you looking to spend?

eshua
02-20-2013, 07:23 PM
On my sushi bar, most of the chefs have bought a deba but ended up using it as a beater for removing heads // breaking the spine, but prefer using yanagi to actually fillet, clean the belly, skin and portion.

Maybe its because the deba's they have are too short, or maybe they just never gave the heavy knife a chance.

Its not really my recommendation because I'm using one of the beater deba to clean salmon and black cod, but I have always wondered if there was a yanagi chip resistant enough that I could be breaking pin bones on salmon without worrying, and just keep my little deba for tai and saba.

My bosses susin inox never chips on salmon, but I'd hate to invest in on only to realize that you have to sharpen it specifically to avoid damage.

ThEoRy
02-20-2013, 10:16 PM
I wouldn't go through any bones with a yanagiba.

Mats
02-21-2013, 05:45 PM
If you don't want to spend a truckload of cash but want a pretty large, tough Deba try the Tojiro DP Western Deba at 240mm. That one is pretty versatile too. However, I only have the 170mm version of it as I work with only small fish for home cooking. It's a beater. I even use that thing for veggies if I don't want to get my Gyutos dirty. I guess I use it more as a utility knife but I can see the 240mm being used in a professional kitchen.

ThEoRy
02-21-2013, 07:47 PM
If you don't want to spend a truckload of cash but want a pretty large, tough Deba try the Tojiro DP Western Deba at 240mm. That one is pretty versatile too. However, I only have the 170mm version of it as I work with only small fish for home cooking. It's a beater. I even use that thing for veggies if I don't want to get my Gyutos dirty. I guess I use it more as a utility knife but I can see the 240mm being used in a professional kitchen.

Yeah but it's not a true deba, just a really thick gyuto. Totally different beast. Single bevel deba are simply superb at filleting fish.

Let's revisit the OP, how much are you looking to spend?

gentlecook
02-21-2013, 11:54 PM
Let's revisit the OP, how much are you looking to spend?

>300$

prefer for original deba ~200mm cutting edge.

ThEoRy
02-22-2013, 12:45 AM
Ok I'm seeing some 210mm Yoshihiro deba in white
http://www.echefknife.com/kasumi-deba-chef-knife-knife-8.25-210mm.html
http://www.echefknife.com/kasumi-deba-knife-8.25-210mm.html

Some 195mm in white

http://www.echefknife.com/kasumi-deba-chef-knife-knife-7.7-195mm-shitan-handle.html
http://www.echefknife.com/kasumi-deba-chef-knife-knife-7.7-195mm.html


Here's a blue #1 at 195mm that just stretches your budget a smidge
blue http://www.echefknife.com/hongasumi-deba-chef-knife-7.7-195mm.html


But then there's Tanaka Blue #2
210mm Kasumi for $180-$190 http://www.metalmaster-ww.com/product/44 or the nameless shop
or Tanaka Damascus 210mm Blue #2 for $280 http://www.metalmaster-ww.com/product/42

And of course Jon has the 210mm Gesshin Uraku formerly Yoshihiro as well http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives-by-type/deba/gesshin-uraku-210mm-white-2-deba.html

So what else may narrow it down? White or blue? I like blue for it's hardness but some like white. Either way a microbevel isn't a bad idea though.

Miles
02-22-2013, 01:09 AM
I picked up a Tojiro shirogami 240 mioroshi a couple months back. It's been a good performer for the coin. Definitely has made life easier in the kitchen. Big enough to do some of the tough stuff but thin enough to make quick work of filleting. It's been a really nice multitasker.