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rdpx
03-20-2013, 11:34 AM
This is a really boring question I am afraid.

I need to get a chopping board to replace my bamboo one, and I am planning on getting an 18"x12" white plastic one to use until I find an end grain that I like/can afford.

I have been confronted with two choices:

1. 0.5" or 1" thick
2. High or Low density

Can anyone advise what I need to choose?

Thanks
:O
N00B

Timthebeaver
03-20-2013, 11:43 AM
Plastic? I'd go with whichever is cheapest.

El Pescador
03-20-2013, 11:49 AM
1/2 inch Sanituff. You can find them at rest. Supply stores.

Timthebeaver
03-20-2013, 11:56 AM
Never seen a Sani Tuff in the UK. Cheapo hygiplas thing the way forward when 25 quid will get you a servicable endgrain board.

rdpx
03-20-2013, 11:59 AM
Hygiplas is what I am looking at (from Nisbets) - they run at 5 or 10.

I guess question really is do I need to worry about high or low density?


Never seen a Sani Tuff in the UK. Cheapo hygiplas thing the way forward when 25 quid will get you a servicable endgrain board.

Timthebeaver
03-20-2013, 12:05 PM
I guess these things are polythene. High density is likely to be harder on your edges but more durable.

chinacats
03-20-2013, 12:14 PM
Not sure about the quality of the plastic, but from their website, the density is related to the temperature range...plastic does funny things outside it's intended use range.

http://www.hygiplas.co.uk/docs/materials.htm

Why not just save some cash and get an endgrain when you are ready?

zitangy
03-20-2013, 01:47 PM
Not sure about the quality of the plastic, but from their website, the density is related to the temperature range...plastic does funny things outside it's intended use range.

http://www.hygiplas.co.uk/docs/materials.htm

Why not just save some cash and get an endgrain when you are ready?

From the specs.. you shldnt be pouring boiling hot water on it as the max tem is either 70 or 80 degrees.

rgds
d

Doug8066
03-23-2013, 11:46 PM
I've had end grain plus Rimu, Kauri and other woods including bamboo.
What I use now is mainly white transluscent plastic boards. These are very cheap (and thus not a status item) But they are quite soft, and cause minimal damage to my 1-2 micron (I guess) knife edge.
I just scrub these after use, hot water, lots of detergent, hard nylon brush, and then drain dry.
If I want to sanitise then, I spray with 2% hydrogen peroxide or 0.2% cetrimide solution, let stand 5 minutes, then drain dry.

rdpx
03-24-2013, 10:08 AM
I've had end grain plus Rimu, Kauri and other woods including bamboo.
What I use now is mainly white transluscent plastic boards. These are very cheap (and thus not a status item) But they are quite soft, and cause minimal damage to my 1-2 micron (I guess) knife edge.
I just scrub these after use, hot water, lots of detergent, hard nylon brush, and then drain dry.
If I want to sanitise then, I spray with 2% hydrogen peroxide or 0.2% cetrimide solution, let stand 5 minutes, then drain dry.

That's exactly what I am planning on getting, Doug. Main thing I really wanted to find from this thread was if anyone could advise me on high or low density. I imagine it makes little difference.

How thick are the ones you use?

Doug8066
03-26-2013, 09:02 PM
The one I use are about 1/3 to 1/4 inch thick. They appear to be made of nylon or some similar plastic. They are cheap and freely available from stores.
They are of I, suppose, medium density, which is to say they are solid plastic. Quite strong, but not all that hard.
These chopping boards are not a glamour item, they are purely functional. The main priority is that they lie flat, do not damage the knife edge, and are easily washable.

in the past I have had some more expensive native timber boards, and they were okay, but a bit high in the maintenance department. I prefer to spend my energies on knife sharpening.

rdpx
03-27-2013, 01:40 PM
Thanks Doug - I am all for function over form - will get one soon.


The one I use are about 1/3 to 1/4 inch thick. They appear to be made of nylon or some similar plastic. They are cheap and freely available from stores.
They are of I, suppose, medium density, which is to say they are solid plastic. Quite strong, but not all that hard.
These chopping boards are not a glamour item, they are purely functional. The main priority is that they lie flat, do not damage the knife edge, and are easily washable.

in the past I have had some more expensive native timber boards, and they were okay, but a bit high in the maintenance department. I prefer to spend my energies on knife sharpening.