PDA

View Full Version : How are hand rubbed Satin Finishes achieved?



Shimmer
05-15-2011, 01:10 PM
Can anyone give a detailed explanation as to how satin finishes are applied to a blade?

Example :

http://www.bladegallery.com/pics/88207_1_b.jpg

rockbox
05-15-2011, 01:24 PM
Its actually a very simple process but requires a lot of work. Sand with wet-dry sandpaper from 200 until all the scratches are gone, then continue with 400, 800, 1200, and then 2000 until the previous grits scratches are all gone. You also have to sand all in one direction.

Eamon Burke
05-15-2011, 05:40 PM
ditto, but I've found that applying oil, either mineral oil or cutting oil, to the blade helps produce a more uniform finish.

EdipisReks
05-15-2011, 06:06 PM
he, i was doing that with a knife this morning. i use micro-mesh pads. i use a home made jig to keep the knife straight for the first few grades, but i do it by hand on the finer pads, as i find it helps prevent hot spots if the sides of the knife aren't flat. putting a folded up towel under wet dry is really useful, if you don't use sanding pads.

rockbox
05-15-2011, 06:32 PM
ditto, but I've found that applying oil, either mineral oil or cutting oil, to the blade helps produce a more uniform finish.

Water works also

PierreRodrigue
05-16-2011, 01:22 AM
mobil 1 synthetic, beautiful.

rockbox
05-16-2011, 12:07 PM
Does the viscosity of the oil prevent the abrasive from biting as deeply? I got to try to mobil 1, I got a lot of half empty bottles from my oil changes.

Bill Burke
05-16-2011, 02:44 PM
I can tell you that that one was done ........"by Hand"....:wink::lol2::lol2::lol2:



I use spray way glass gleaner.

Shimmer
05-16-2011, 03:15 PM
I can tell you that that one was done ........"by Hand"....:wink::lol2::lol2::lol2:



I use spray way glass gleaner.


Hi Bill,

This is a beautiful finish that you have put on the knife. Besides the spray, how did you go about putting a satin finish on it?

Aldo Bruno
05-16-2011, 06:01 PM
WD-40, buy it by the gallon. It doesn't seem to clog the paper as much as oil. Then Windex for the real fine grits.

Bill Burke
05-16-2011, 07:30 PM
Hi Bill,

This is a beautiful finish that you have put on the knife. Besides the spray, how did you go about putting a satin finish on it?

I first grind to a 1200 grit norax blt then drop back to Norton 800 grit black ice then 1000 grit then 1500 then back to 1000. these are all backed by a soft rubber block.

mainaman
05-17-2011, 12:20 AM
on a razor best way is to buff it
take it to 600 greaseless and that gives you perfect satin if done right.

Bill Burke
05-17-2011, 12:42 AM
I am not a authority on the subjet but I would stay away from a buffer with a straight razor. it is way too easy to overheat the thin blade and totally ruin it. I have also made quite abit of money "fixing " razors that were buffed and the edge rounded so badly that they had to be taken to a 220 grit stone to reestablish proper edge geometry.

mainaman
05-17-2011, 02:18 AM
I am not a authority on the subjet but I would stay away from a buffer with a straight razor. it is way too easy to overheat the thin blade and totally ruin it. In my experience greaseless does not heat up nearly as much as polishing compounds. People usually keep a glass of water and dip the blades often to coll them down.

I have also made quite abit of money "fixing " razors that were buffed and the edge rounded so badly that they had to be taken to a 220 grit stone to reestablish proper edge geometry.
Yes this is a problem, this can happen when people have no experience, the buffing wheel is too big for the razor (6" used for 5/8 razor for example), or people want to remove too much material and hit the edge.

I just remembered a way to get even finish by hand, an eraser will deform to accomodate the shape of the blade and will give very nice even finish.

Ivan Campos
05-17-2011, 01:11 PM
It is pretty easy - I start with a 220 grit from my belt grinder, and from them I can hand rub with 320 grit sandpaper using mineral oil and a hard backing like a micarta block, and repeating the process to the desired grit of sandpaper. As a final step you can use scotchbrite and it will make the blade less bright. Of course, be prepared to spend some elbow grease in the process, too! As with everything in life, it will become easier and simpler as you get more pratice.

JMJones
05-17-2011, 03:07 PM
One thing to add that I had wrong when I first started knife making, you dont need to go all in one direction until the end. Now I scrub the daylights out of the blade going back and forth and also switch directions with each grit until over 600.