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Ucmd
04-12-2013, 10:07 PM
can you make a veloute 1 day ahead of time and reheat? Also, can you make without a roux...maybe cornstarch to thicken?

turbochef422
04-12-2013, 10:33 PM
Yes you can definitely make it ahead of time. We make 5 gallon buckets or 3 days worth at a time. I always use roux but I can't see why you couldn't use a slurry. The consistancy and texture will be different but it should be ok.

jayhay
04-12-2013, 10:34 PM
You can def make it ahead of time. A roux is traditional for a veloute. I wouldn't recommend corn starch, totally different flavor and texture.

Von blewitt
04-12-2013, 10:37 PM
What flavour are you making? What quantity? If its only a small amount, thickening with a vegetable purée is a good way to go

Also Xanthum gum is an option if you are ok with that sort of thing

Ucmd
04-12-2013, 10:40 PM
thx all

marc4pt0
04-12-2013, 11:18 PM
Xanthum gum works great, but I recomend cutting it with a bit of locust bean gum for a less "gel" like consistency. Veg puree is also another terrific method, but of course it depends on what flavor veloute you're making and what you'd be using it for. You can also use rice. Either over cook then add, puree and strain, or add the rice to the stock, cook until soft, puree and strain.
Cornstarch works also, but kind of leaves that Asian fast food texture and flavor (which isn't always a bad thing!) And remember that cornstarch continues to "hydrate" or thicken even after the liquid has cooled, which just means for a thicker veloute tomorrow.

mzer
04-12-2013, 11:25 PM
What kinds of restaurants still make veloute? Serious question. I've been out of the biz a while.

ThEoRy
04-12-2013, 11:34 PM
What kinds of restaurants still make veloute? Serious question. I've been out of the biz a while.

Lots of em. It's one of the 5 mother sauces.


Also about the xanthan gum method. I recommend using ultratex 8 for the thickener and just a touch of xanthan as a stabilizer. Perfect velvety texture, great mouth feel and no snotty consistency.

marc4pt0
04-12-2013, 11:34 PM
I still make them, in all kinds of shapes and sizes. Classics- you just can't kill them, but you can "update" them a bit.

mzer
04-12-2013, 11:36 PM
Interesting. I wasn't aware it was common outside of culinary schools. I have no problem with it. It just would have been unthinkable anywhere I worked.

marc4pt0
04-12-2013, 11:46 PM
man, sorry to hear that. and slightly sad too. Eh, their loss. But hey, I'm more of the "from scratch" kind of guy.

mzer
04-12-2013, 11:57 PM
man, sorry to hear that. and slightly sad too. Eh, their loss. But hey, I'm more of the "from scratch" kind of guy.

I am assuming you are responding to me. It's actually not what you are assuming. I am old, well sort of old, and worked during the height of the rejection of La Grande Cuisine in very cutting edge places both in the US and in Europe. It wasn't made because the classics were out, not because corners were cut. I am interested to hear it is back, though. And not disappointed.

MadMel
04-13-2013, 04:37 AM
I think xantan gives the best texture but just work it in a little bit of the liquid you want to thicken 1st with a mortar and pastel, trying to get as little bubbles in it as possible. Then add that thick gloop to your main pot of product and slowly incorporate. I find that this method gives you minimal trapped air bubbles.

augerpro
04-18-2013, 07:34 AM
I'd be curious what recipes you guys have? I just started into French cooking and most of my focus has been on veloute and espangole. Right now I just have a mushroom and onion veloute, and a tarragon veloute I like.

ThEoRy
04-18-2013, 10:09 AM
Recipe schmeshipe..

augerpro
04-18-2013, 03:59 PM
I guess what I'm asking is what flavorings you use.

Stumblinman
04-18-2013, 08:09 PM
I'd use whatever 'flavorings' work good with your stock. The last veloute I made was seafood version. But then I took some and mixed in sweet peppers and some with squid ink. Tri colored 'base' on the plate under some scallops. I didn't use roux but then again I had the time to reduce everything down. Worked fine without roux. (I took a couple hours slow reduction )

And then that's not including making chowder or chicken pot pie or whatever soup at home...

augerpro
04-18-2013, 10:58 PM
I'm mostly working on using it with chicken or over green veggies and rice. So just looking for some ideas of what goes well with those.

ThEoRy
04-18-2013, 11:25 PM
I'm mostly working on using it with chicken or over green veggies and rice. So just looking for some ideas of what goes well with those.

Chicken stock, roasted garlic, white wine. Simple.

MadMel
04-19-2013, 04:23 AM
Chicken stock, roasted garlic, white wine. Simple.

Second that! With chicken, depending on how you are cooking it, you might want to switch out the white wine with some kind of flavored/herbed vinegar for a slight acid touch. Over green veg and rice, try something a little Asian, shaoxin wine, roasted garlic and deep fried shallots, oyster sauce etc. Possibilities are endless!