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Jmadams13
04-13-2013, 02:33 PM
I want to start trying cooking with chopsticks. I use them to eat a lot, but only the cheap carryout kind. What are your recomendations for plating and while cooking?

Thanks
Joe

Seth
04-13-2013, 03:35 PM
I had moribashi but sold them to a forum member because I found them to be too slippery. Probably more my fine motor skills. Maybe the guy I sold them too will chime in.

lowercasebill
04-13-2013, 04:52 PM
http://korin.com/Kitchenware_2/Kitchen-Utensils_2

scroll down the page they have cooking and plating in wood..

i use 13 in. wood for cooking [my son brought ne 2 sets from japan] i use them all the time and.....

i have 2 sets of moribashi one from Jon at JKI and a pair brought from japan..
i would start with wood before investing in fancy moribashi , i have considerable fine motor skills and i find them hard to use .but they sure look nice on display with the knives . i think the learning curve would not be helpful in a commercial kitchen

Jmadams13
04-13-2013, 06:14 PM
Thanks for the tip. I'm going to definitely start using them at home first, till I develope the skill and muscle memory for when things get crazy at work.

I'm thinking of ordering a few different ones and different lengths from korin. Being that cheap, why not spend the 20 and try different ones out.

Seth
04-13-2013, 09:42 PM
.... , i have considerable fine motor skills...

I really, really hope so!!!

MrBoogs
04-13-2013, 10:56 PM
If I might be so bold, I keep a set of these in my bag and find it gets me pretty much all the way there.

http://www.amazon.com/Stainless-Steel-Cooking-Chopsticks-C4214/dp/B0011EVWYW/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1365904454&sr=8-5&keywords=moribashi

The plastic handle makes a very good heat sink, the tips are textured which is very helpful for frying, and at this cost I wouldn't weep if I lost them.

Von blewitt
04-13-2013, 11:06 PM
I use a pair of moribashi for finishing details on some dishes, but I'm in a 30 seat fine diner. I wouldn't be able to keep up in a busy place haha

I sometimes practice moving single grains of rice or sea salt flakes..... But I'm weird:razz:

slowtyper
04-14-2013, 04:05 AM
I have a pair I bought during a trip to Japan. I try to use it on the line sometimes, but its hard to work quickly with them. Still, its an open kitchen so its nice to have them out and put on a little show sometimes, haha.

Zwiefel
04-14-2013, 04:14 AM
I have a couple of pair of wood ones: one thats about 13-14" and a bit thicker than usual chopsticks; the other is about 9-10" and the usual thickness but with grooves carved in about 1/4" apart on the last 3".

The latter are MUCH better for cooking. I use them for things like turning each cube of meat individually when browning meat for stew or chili...for manipulating doughnuts, eggrolls, fish, etc. When Im deep-frying.

I really like them, but havent found wide use for them.
:2cents:

schanop
04-14-2013, 08:04 AM
I use a pair of moribashi for finishing details on some dishes, but I'm in a 30 seat fine diner. I wouldn't be able to keep up in a busy place haha

I sometimes practice moving single grains of rice or sea salt flakes..... But I'm weird:razz:

That's a good kung fu practice. Try quail egg sometimes, :-)

MadMel
04-16-2013, 03:41 AM
For plating, there are 2 major considerations: Balance and how narrow the tips are. I find that the tip heavy moribashis are a lot more difficult to control and are not as suited to plating fine details. Narrow tips mean how close to the end of the chopsticks do the tips touch. You want it to be touching RIGHT AT THE END, especially if you are using it to plate fine details.

For cooking, considerations are heat resistance, balance and weight, length. I believe these are pretty self explainatory.

Best of luck in your search! BTW Jon at JKI has a few. I fully recommend trying out any chopsticks before making a purchase.

Sambal
05-07-2013, 08:04 AM
I sometimes practice moving single grains of rice or sea salt flakes..... But I'm weird:razz:


Ah glasshopper . . . after this you now must try picking up an almost completely melted globule of ice cube!
Been there, done that.

MadMel
05-08-2013, 01:25 AM
Ah glasshopper . . . after this you now must try picking up an almost completely melted globule of ice cube!
Been there, done that.

I do mung beans for precision and marbles for strenth :p

xuz
05-08-2013, 02:00 AM
Ah glasshopper . . . after this you now must try picking up an almost completely melted globule of ice cube!
Been there, done that.

But can you do this?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYSenACVQ6s

Sambal
05-09-2013, 12:15 PM
But can you do this?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYSenACVQ6s

Amazing! But not fair, two hands. Ha Ha! This could be edited with Chopsticks music.

kpeddie2010
05-18-2013, 07:21 AM
i use moribashi only when i do fine plating and small amuse bouches because i find it to be ineffiecient. hands and spoons and tweezers are much faster.