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DevinT
04-25-2013, 04:56 PM
I have not done anything creative for months. I still do not have the okay from the doctor to work, and I have lots of work that I owe folks, however, I need to make something without obligation. I apologize to those that I owe things.

The project that I have in mind is this: make a knife from salvaged material that would be something of value and very cool. I know several makers that like being green and using stuff that can be recycled. I have a 5 foot ring of wrought iron weighing 200# that was salvaged from a piece of equipment that was used in an old mine near here. Before the days of mild steel, they made and used wrought iron. It is made by getting iron to a semi molten state and creating a large ball of sponge iron mixed with some silica slag. They would squeeze this down and forge weld it onto itself multiple times to remove some of the slag and impurities. The result was a stringy iron bar with about 2% silica. Because the iron is nearly pure, it does rust but does not become cancerous like mild steel. They used wrought iron for anything structural, pipe. wagon wheel rims, mining equipment etc. If you look around it can be found today.We'll forge this out for the cladding on a sanmai blade.

The core material (pictured on top of the ring) came from the old Western Cutlery Co. that went from 1911 to 1984. They were based in Colorado and made fixed and folding sporting knives. I'm not sure if they made any kitchen knives. The steel is a grade that was developed specifically for knives and cutlery. It is known as 1095CV or 50100 and is still used by CASE and others for their carbon steel knives today. It is 1095 with the addition of chrome and vanadium. A knife maker close by picked it up as scrap and I got some from him 20 years ago.

I think that the profile will be the same as the Forgecraft. I like this idea because Forgecraft made their first knives from salvaged saw blades that had the recognizable pattern rolled into the surface to help keep the blade running cool at the saw mill.

We'll do a little every day. Not sure how long it'll take. Pic's are of the ring, cutting a small piece, and welding a tang so that we can forge it out.

More on the handle later.

Love and respect

Hoss

WildBoar
04-25-2013, 05:05 PM
Looks like a cool project. Nice to see you back in the shop, but don't push things too much!

sachem allison
04-25-2013, 07:15 PM
Devin's giving some forgecraft love. Can't wait. If I had the dough, I'd commission one for myself.
lol
have fun, take it easy.

tgraypots
04-25-2013, 08:15 PM
too cool. I'm looking forward to seeing the progression. thanks for sharing.

Zwiefel
04-25-2013, 08:31 PM
Interesting project Hoss! Happy to see you doing something purely for passion.

Marko Tsourkan
04-25-2013, 09:44 PM
I think some of the best knives comes from these experiments. Way to go Devin! I know you have been itching to make a knife for a long time.

M

don
04-25-2013, 10:07 PM
Very interesting project! Really looking forward to the progress.

ThEoRy
04-26-2013, 12:03 AM
Cool man. Just glad you are feeling well enough to get moving even if it's just a little bit. You go a bit crazy when you haven't created anything in awhile.

Best Regards,
Rick

knyfeknerd
04-26-2013, 01:16 AM
Love the action pic with the Hoss glove

Hoss= Funky Boss
Hoss=Awesome sauce
Hoss=money floss
Hoss=Golden Gloss

I don't have anything in the works by Devin, but I wanna see him get back in action again so bad!

DevinT
04-26-2013, 02:11 AM
Thanks everyone.

Love and respect

Hoss

Lefty
04-26-2013, 06:02 AM
This is gonna be a fun ride!

DevinT
04-26-2013, 02:08 PM
Trouble!

The force of the rolling mill split the wrought iron right down the middle.

Hoss

El Pescador
04-26-2013, 02:40 PM
That stinks!

knyfeknerd
04-26-2013, 03:03 PM
That Darth Vader boot is screwing up your Chi!
How long till you get that thang off Hoss?

WildBoar
04-26-2013, 03:25 PM
Could turn this into one really cool pair of scissors! :groucho:

Zwiefel
04-26-2013, 03:37 PM
:curse: Does that mean this piece of metal is kaput? Restart with a new piece?

If you get slag on your footwear, it'll be harder to fool the Dr.!

DevinT
04-26-2013, 03:46 PM
I'll re-forge it and mix it with some other old wrought iron, we'll be fine. As for the foot , I just put that photo in there for sympathy.

Hoss

Dave Martell
04-26-2013, 04:01 PM
Nice, I'm following along on this one.

Hey Devin, if it was your other foot could you still work the treadle as good with your left?

Larrin
04-26-2013, 04:04 PM
I knew I learned something in forging and forming.

http://s24.postimg.org/vfe2kwl29/center_split.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/vfe2kwl29/)

DevinT
04-26-2013, 04:08 PM
Nice, I'm following along on this one.

Hey Devin, if it was your other foot could you still work the treadle as good with your left?

Left foot, blind folded, while sleeping.

Thanks Dave,

Hoss

DevinT
04-26-2013, 04:12 PM
I knew I learned something in forging and forming.

http://s24.postimg.org/vfe2kwl29/center_split.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/vfe2kwl29/)

It happened just like the diagram. I've had this happen before, always does it when there is a weak vertical weld near the middle. It can usually be prevented by arc welding the end before it is rolled.

Thanks son

Zwiefel
04-26-2013, 04:28 PM
I knew I learned something in forging and forming.

http://s24.postimg.org/vfe2kwl29/center_split.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/vfe2kwl29/)

Interesting pic, thanks!


purely out of curiosity...."Inhomogeneities?" why not "heterogeneities?"

ajhuff
04-26-2013, 04:33 PM
Interesting pic, thanks!


purely out of curiosity...."Inhomogeneities?" why not "heterogeneities?"

Because they are not equally distributed.

-AJ

DevinT
04-26-2013, 07:15 PM
@Larrin, I don't quite understand the explanation. There's not much width growth while rolling. The strain seems to be because the center stays hotter longer and grows faster than the edges causing it to split like it did. In diagram (a) it shows the strain opposite from my experience.

Dad

PierreRodrigue
04-26-2013, 07:46 PM
Good to see you back at it Devin, go slow and have fun. Looking forward to this one as well!!

SpikeC
04-26-2013, 08:00 PM
Most of my rolling is with non ferrous metals, butt I see quite a bit of width growth when rolling.

DevinT
04-26-2013, 09:22 PM
Most of my rolling is with non ferrous metals, butt I see quite a bit of width growth when rolling.

Before I rolled it, it measured 4" x 7 1/2", after rolling it measured 4" x 9 1/2" not counting the split. There was no detectable growth in width as apposed to ~22% in length.

Hoss

Larrin
04-26-2013, 09:44 PM
Typically there is little increase in the width in rolling. Oftentimes it is zero. With thick pieces you can have spreading, however.

Larrin
04-26-2013, 09:50 PM
@Larrin, I don't quite understand the explanation. There's not much width growth while rolling. The strain seems to be because the center stays hotter longer and grows faster than the edges causing it to split like it did. In diagram (a) it shows the strain opposite from my experience.

Dad
The reason that the ends of the bar are round is because the center lengthens more than the edges. This is from more than the just the center staying hot, it's related to the "friction hill" that is mentioned in the section I posted. This difference creates the tension in the edges.

Zwiefel
04-26-2013, 11:49 PM
Because they are not equally distributed.

-AJ

I was hoping there would be an interesting answer...but I didn't understand it. inhomogeneity = evenly distributed differences and heterogeneity = non-evenly distributed differences?

ajhuff
04-27-2013, 12:49 AM
I was hoping there would be an interesting answer...but I didn't understand it. inhomogeneity = evenly distributed differences and heterogeneity = non-evenly distributed differences?

Well it's not something I have ever reflected much on though I am not sure I have use the word heterogeneous much in regards to metal. The confusion might stem from most people subconsciously have milk as a reference.

I guess I might describe a metal matrix composite or cast iron as heterogeneous as they involve materials with two constituents evenly, more or less, distributed. However, if I was melting in a medium frequency induction furnace which stirs the slag into the melt evenly from top to bottom I do say it is a homogeneous melt.

I guess for metallurgists the opposite of homogeneous is in-homogeneous not heterogeneous. Just that simple. :-)

-AJ

Zwiefel
04-27-2013, 12:55 AM
Well it's not something I have ever reflected much on though I am not sure I have use the word heterogeneous much in regards to metal. The confusion might stem from most people subconsciously have milk as a reference.

I guess I might describe a metal matrix composite or cast iron as heterogeneous as they involve materials with two constituents evenly, more or less, distributed. However, if I was melting in a medium frequency induction furnace which stirs the slag into the melt evenly from top to bottom I do say it is a homogeneous melt.

I guess for metallurgists the opposite of homogeneous is in-homogeneous not heterogeneous. Just that simple. :-)

-AJ

I can accept that. Thanks AJ!

DevinT
04-27-2013, 06:27 PM
We re-forged the wrought iron and put it with some other old wrought iron from a wagon wheel. You can see some layering even though there are only 7 layers. We'll draw this out and restack and re-weld. Then it should be ready to sanmai.

Hoss

Zwiefel
04-27-2013, 06:35 PM
back on track! so to speak. :)

Dave Martell
04-27-2013, 10:58 PM
Left foot, blind folded, while sleeping.

Thanks Dave,

Hoss


Yeah I had a feeling that was the case. :D

Lefty
04-28-2013, 09:04 AM
Very cool stuff, Hoss. Your shop and tools seem to be in incredible shape, which says a fair bit about you. I wish I was neater, but alas....

Just thinkin', you should get Mike Davis to paint for you. :D

DevinT
04-28-2013, 10:35 AM
Tru dat!

Thanks for all the love peeps.

Hoss

Johnny.B.Good
04-28-2013, 12:29 PM
Thanks for the WIP thread, Devin.

Hope that foot of yours is feeling better by the day, too.

Justin0505
04-28-2013, 02:22 PM
There's a huge mental and emotional component to physical recovery and healing so I can see why even though the doctor hasnt given you the clear yet, getting back to what you were clearly made to do could be very therapeutic.
Thanks for the WIP and I hope you're back up to 100% Hoss Power soon.

wsfarrell
04-28-2013, 02:34 PM
"100% Hoss Power" sounds like a great idea for a t-shirt to me.

Lefty
04-28-2013, 08:45 PM
Damn, that does sound awesome!

DevinT
05-01-2013, 01:42 AM
Here's the restack and re-weld. I think that we can sanmai this tomorrow.

Hoss

kalaeb
05-01-2013, 04:17 AM
Looking good Devin, hope it works out.

Zwiefel
05-01-2013, 10:20 AM
Is there a pattern/striations in the steel? or is that just cutting marks?

DevinT
05-01-2013, 11:20 AM
Yea, you can see the layers, but the saw marks make it hard to see. Good eye Z.

Hoss

WillC
05-01-2013, 11:41 AM
Nice post Hoss, wrought can be tricky stuff, so many different grades of it. The cleanest stuff I had was from inside a mine shaft, it was a structural grade piece off a coal truck. The latest stuff I used was trash in comparison, just thin barrel hoops and heavily cider corroded:D. But it worked after further refining as you have done.
I watch it being re-rolled on the big rolls at Iron bridge sometimes. Big half chain links, out of the furnace at welding heat, couple of dinks under the steam hammer to straighten it out, then back and forth through the rolls into 2 inch 3 meter long bars.

DevinT
05-01-2013, 01:30 PM
Will, are the rolls at Ironbridge an historical thing or a working shop.

Hoss

WillC
05-01-2013, 02:02 PM
A bit of both to keep them going. I'm sure there is some funding involved and I think most of the guys who do the work are enthusiasts. But companies like Chris Topp and co, who re-rolls iron himself commercially, make use of the facility, or leases it and the workforce. I'm sure that helps keep it going. I have a load of pictures somewhere. I will dig them out and put them up somewhere. If you come to the uk, Iron-bridge must be on a Hoss must visit list.:D

DevinT
05-02-2013, 12:48 AM
Stacking, heating, and forging.

DevinT
05-02-2013, 12:53 AM
Rolling, cutting, the bars, and annealing in the furnace. And why does this thing rearrange my photos?

Hoss

kalaeb
05-02-2013, 12:57 AM
Great thread. Looking forward to seeing the finished product.

What sort of wind swept, recycled, cool looking piece are you using for a handle?

DevinT
05-02-2013, 01:18 AM
Local elk horn for the handle.

Hoss

sachem allison
05-02-2013, 02:23 AM
now your talking. can't wait! can't wait! can't wait!

DevinT
05-02-2013, 02:10 PM
cutting the blank

G-rat
05-02-2013, 02:33 PM
Gah! This is like the coolest thing ever.

MowgFace
05-02-2013, 03:12 PM
Is the excess going to be a matching petty!?

don
05-02-2013, 03:43 PM
Really exciting. Thanks for taking us along.

Zwiefel
05-02-2013, 08:43 PM
yay! no splitting this time.

marc4pt0
05-02-2013, 09:25 PM
the excess looks like it could be a nakiri!

Bill Burke
05-02-2013, 11:25 PM
Hey hoss How did you turn that sharp corner on the band saw?

DevinT
05-03-2013, 12:55 AM
Flexible band saw blades, or maybe a .045 x 4 inch cut off wheel and a die grinder.

Hoss

apicius9
05-03-2013, 05:38 AM
Very cool thread, I only just checked in for the first time. My family on my father's side were metal workers, I wish I had paid more attention as a kid... But my Grandpa made more boring things like welding ornamental metal gates and fences, nothing exciting like forging things... Nevertheless, I feel some affinity to metal work. Maybe one day...

Stefan

Justin0505
05-03-2013, 06:15 AM
Hey hoss How did you turn that sharp corner on the band saw?

Hoss Power! Duh.

DevinT
05-03-2013, 01:57 PM
Profiling, belts, center punching the tang, name stamp, and drilling the holes for the handle bolts.

I showed a pic of the belts because this is one necessary evil. It is always exciting to get new belts and always hard to throw them away when they are worn out. I had a former employee steal about $25,000.00 worth of stuff from me and the only thing that I was upset about was that he stole about $1000.00 worth of belts. The sheriff's department got them back for me and I was one happy camper.

Hoss

Mucho Bocho
05-03-2013, 02:34 PM
thanks for taking the time to photograph and post them for us to see Hoss. Moi impressive

DevinT
05-03-2013, 02:40 PM
Heating in the Evenheat, quenching in oil, keeping it straight in the horizontal vice, and the sub-zero quench, into the tempering oven next.

We are leaving for graduation. We had an exchange student a few years ago from Hong Kong. She has attended a university close by and is graduating today. She is crazy. Her parents have a restaurant and she said she could cook in her bio before we picked her, I cooked a lot more Chinese food for her than she did for us. Her idea of cooking was to warm some imitation crab meat with some cheese on top in the microwave. We've had four exchange students and love all of them.

Hoss

Zwiefel
05-03-2013, 06:56 PM
Looking good!

(I'm irrationally amused to see all these photos and think, "I've touched that wall/grinder/flask/oven/etc. before!" :happymug:, thanks again for that, Hoss.)

don
05-03-2013, 08:47 PM
HT before grind? Doesn't it make it more difficult?

Funny about the exchange student. Hope that the graduation was good. Has to be rewarding.

knyfeknerd
05-04-2013, 01:44 AM
Hoss, can I be your next exchange student?
I really can cook!

JohnnyChance
05-04-2013, 02:12 PM
Awesome thread Hoss.

JohnnyChance
05-04-2013, 02:16 PM
HT before grind? Doesn't it make it more difficult?

Before HT the metal is soft and gummy. Also, the thinner it is when you go to HT the more problems you can end up with warping. Plus Devin has a giant grinder to do his distal taper on which helps remove some mass before bevels get ground in.

don
05-04-2013, 07:35 PM
Before HT the metal is soft and gummy. Also, the thinner it is when you go to HT the more problems you can end up with warping. Plus Devin has a giant grinder to do his distal taper on which helps remove some mass before bevels get ground in.

Thanks for the information. Interesting, interesting. I do love Devin's WIP.

DevinT
05-04-2013, 08:47 PM
Removing metal prior to hand grinding. Doing the distal taper on the surface grinder. Hand grinding the blade. Some of the layers showing. Final rough grind.

Thanks everyone, love and respect.

Hoss

Lefty
05-04-2013, 09:14 PM
Looks incredible, Hoss!

don
05-04-2013, 09:16 PM
Stunning, and it's not even done yet.

skiajl6297
05-04-2013, 09:18 PM
I would like to buy this. :). Very cool.

Zwiefel
05-04-2013, 09:21 PM
looking Hossome even before the etch!

sachem allison
05-04-2013, 09:52 PM
I would like to buy this. :). Very cool.

back off , buddy! lol

sachem allison
05-04-2013, 09:53 PM
very nicely done, congratulations! one of these days.

cwrightthruya
05-05-2013, 12:34 AM
That is absolutely amazing!!! Thanks for doing the WIP.

Burl Source
05-05-2013, 11:07 PM
Very Cool!
The pattern in the steel is looking like wood grain.

evanjohnson
05-06-2013, 09:59 AM
Removing metal prior to hand grinding. Doing the distal taper on the surface grinder. Hand grinding the blade. Some of the layers showing. Final rough grind.

Thanks everyone, love and respect.

Hoss

What does the idler arm setup look like on your surface grinder? I gave away a surface grinder I got when a local factory closed down- looks like I may be back in the market. Every time I get rid of a tool (or knife or gun or ...), I regret it.

KVacc
05-06-2013, 02:20 PM
Very Nice !

DevinT
05-07-2013, 08:38 PM
What does the idler arm setup look like on your surface grinder? I gave away a surface grinder I got when a local factory closed down- looks like I may be back in the market. Every time I get rid of a tool (or knife or gun or ...), I regret it.

Here's some pics.

Hoss

Mike9
05-08-2013, 08:09 PM
Devin - what type of band saw blades are you using? I have a brand called Die Master made for me by Dinosaw here in Hudson, NY and they last 8 - 10 conversions on heat treated steel. That includes a Hiromoto AS - that was a tough one. They are soft near the butt, but it's tougher cutting as you approach the choil. I use a 30 weight/naptha blend for lubricant/cooling. That reminds me I need to order a few new ones.

DevinT
05-08-2013, 08:25 PM
I'm not sure what brand I use, it is a bi-metal M42 blade. I only cut annealed material with mine though. Sounds like your getting pretty good use out of yours.
We use a .045 x 4 inch cut off blade on a die grinder for anything that is hardened.

Hoss

Mike9
05-09-2013, 07:34 AM
Thanks Hoss - I'm going to look into rigging up an air grinder this summer. I can probably make a tap for extra air to keep the work cool.

DevinT
05-14-2013, 11:19 PM
Cutting the horn into useable pieces. This is a shed from around these parts that was given to me by a friend. It's a little bleached out right now but we'll put some color back into it before we're done.

Zwiefel
05-14-2013, 11:23 PM
Gonna look nice.

Andrew H
05-14-2013, 11:45 PM
Is this one going to be for sale, Hoss?

knyfeknerd
05-14-2013, 11:46 PM
This just keeps on getting better and better.

sachem allison
05-15-2013, 01:29 AM
one of my most favorite things elk antler. I made a set of grips for my Ruger Blackhawk about 25 years ago and they are still going strong.

DevinT
05-15-2013, 12:59 PM
Is this one going to be for sale, Hoss?

Yes it is. I have someone that will have first right to buy, if it's not a fit for him, it'll be up for grabs.

Hoss

DevinT
05-15-2013, 10:29 PM
Here's the etched blade. The wrought iron makes it look like an antique. The photo doesn't show it very well but this is some wild stuff.

Thanks for all of the support, and thanks for following the thread.

Love and respect

Hoss

ejd53
05-15-2013, 11:30 PM
Stunning!

Mike9
05-15-2013, 11:40 PM
That's a gorgeous blade Devin - :thumbsup:

JohnnyChance
05-16-2013, 01:51 AM
Great wood-grain-esque pattern there.

don
05-16-2013, 03:05 AM
Simply amazing.

DevinT
05-16-2013, 11:17 PM
Burning and brushing the horn to add color. CA glue applied to the surface and gluing them to some spacer material.

Hoss

kalaeb
05-17-2013, 12:48 AM
That was neat!

Zwiefel
05-17-2013, 02:08 AM
I remember we used to use the torch to lightly scorch wood in high school...it would scorch the different layers at different rates and make a variegated pattern...never thought about using it on other natural materials.

Cool idea Devin!

mdoublestack
05-17-2013, 03:56 AM
This is so cool. Thanks for the glimpse

Don Nguyen
05-17-2013, 12:35 PM
I wonder if it smells funky when you do that?

DevinT
05-17-2013, 12:36 PM
Not as bad as sheep horn.

Hoss

WillC
05-17-2013, 06:38 PM
Gorgeous grain in the iron, like watery ripples.:biggrin:

DevinT
05-18-2013, 05:15 PM
Putting the mokume on the head of the handle bolts. Dry fitting the handle scales.

After we finish the front of the scales, we can glue everything up.

Thanks for following.

Love and respect

Hoss

DevinT
05-18-2013, 09:07 PM
Glue up

marc4pt0
05-18-2013, 09:15 PM
The tang looks slightly hollowed out, is this correct? If so, what's the benefit(s)?

DevinT
05-18-2013, 09:24 PM
It's to hold more epoxy. If everything is too flat, it squishes out the glue.

Hoss

marc4pt0
05-18-2013, 09:28 PM
Nice, just as I had thought. Looks like I'm picking up on some things around here! Thanks, Hoss

Zwiefel
05-18-2013, 09:40 PM
Cool tip Hoss!

DevinT
05-19-2013, 01:37 AM
Handle work

DevinT
05-19-2013, 01:41 AM
Almost done. I worked a little more on this than I should have today. I'll get yelled at by the doc on Monday.

Thanks for following the thread.

Love and respect

Hoss

HHH Knives
05-19-2013, 01:56 AM
Very nice!! Great thread Devin. Thanks for sharing. :)

Its good to see ya back at it, even if only part time and just so ya dont loose it!!! :spin chair:

God Bless

Von blewitt
05-19-2013, 02:00 AM
Sooo cool Hoss!!! Awesome work.

kalaeb
05-19-2013, 02:08 AM
Very nice Devin!

knyfeknerd
05-19-2013, 02:16 AM
I'm speechless.........................

sachem allison
05-19-2013, 02:19 AM
wow!

JohnnyChance
05-19-2013, 02:27 AM
Great job Hoss.

Andrew H
05-19-2013, 02:30 AM
Me... want (both of them, actually :rofl2:)

cclin
05-19-2013, 02:36 AM
Hoss, :nicethread:thanks for full WIP!!

EdipisReks
05-19-2013, 02:45 AM
holly crap!

don
05-19-2013, 03:06 AM
Amazing, amazing, amazing.

Yeah, don't get yelled at by the doc, we want you making knives!

marc4pt0
05-19-2013, 04:35 AM
Nicely done, nicely done. So uhh.... still have my address?

DevinT
05-19-2013, 10:06 AM
Yea, 4444 north Forth street, Forthtown, MD. 44044 right?

Hoss

kalaeb
05-19-2013, 01:19 PM
Now thats funny!

marc4pt0
05-19-2013, 01:32 PM
Yea, 4444 north Forth street, Forthtown, MD. 44044 right?

Hoss

:rofl2::rofl2::rofl2::rofl2:

Love it! But seriously, I'll be there, waiting

ejd53
05-19-2013, 04:05 PM
Absolutely great, Hoss. Love the faux bolster effect. One last thing, I just shipped Marc the Tuxedo Gyuto and you got the zip code wrong. It's actually 44444.

Johnny.B.Good
05-19-2013, 04:25 PM
Outstanding.

Thanks for the pictures and writeup, Devin!

Mrmnms
05-19-2013, 04:30 PM
That knife is too cool. Listen, I'd be happy to deliver it for you. You can trust me ... Really.

DevinT
05-20-2013, 10:26 PM
Thanks guys.

I have a little finishing to do and this one will be done. I have really enjoyed this project. I was surprised that the wrought iron was a little difficult to finish, I think it was do to the silica in the iron. The heat treat came out good on this one. The mokume handle bolts are a fun touch to this piece and will darken/patina with age. I love stag horn and these scales have nice color with some very light colored horn underneath. I'm intrigued with the simplicity of the forgecraft knives. One of the reasons that I copied the forgcraft is that it was originally made from salvaged saw blades. We have done projects like this in the past but it has been a while. Thank you to all of the knife makers doing similar things and inspiring me to do this one.

Love and respect

Hoss

Lefty
05-21-2013, 01:29 PM
Hoss,

It's awesome! Period. :D On top of that, I do have question and I'd love to get your take on it. As you know, Luke Snyder uses recycled steel, almost exclusively, as well as salvage materials for handles and even his aprons. How do you feel about the use of old saw blades and the like, for everyday projects? From what I've experienced with the multiple knives of Luke's that I've used, the steel was outstanding: tough, hard, keen...I really like it, and think it's a great way to clean up scrapyards and bring new life to something that was tossed aside. What do you think?

DevinT
05-21-2013, 02:13 PM
I love what those guys are doing. There are lots good steels that can be found from recycled materials. Springs, saw blades, files, chainsaw bars, etc. It's most important to learn how to heat treat the steel than what the steel is. I recommend that if you use recycled materials that you find a consistent source for it.

One of the things that we've done over the years is to take materials that have a connection with the customer and forge it into the Damascus, making it personal for them. Lots of fun.

As for handles, the weirder the better.

Love and respect

Hoss

Burl Source
05-21-2013, 05:19 PM
The knife turned out great.
An idea if you do another similar knife;
Wire brushed wenge for a handle like you have done before.
Would give a rustic look with wood grain matching the steel pattern.
(just thinking out loud)

Dave Martell
05-21-2013, 11:47 PM
Mokume bolt making - you're nuts! :headbang:

stereo.pete
05-22-2013, 12:00 AM
Hoss, all I have to say is that I own two of your mid-tech's and they are incredible. I hope to one day be lucky enough to own a custom by you!