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rhondarc
05-03-2013, 11:06 PM
So my fiance and I are registering for our wedding and neither of us know anything about knives. I probably won't end up answering these right...you can tell I'm a newbie. Can you give me some suggestions?

What type of knife(s) do you think you want?
Well, we have nothing except a cheap paring knife...so the utter basics

Why is it being purchased? What, if anything, are you replacing?
We have no knives (soon to be newlyweds, never lived on our own)

What do you like and dislike about these qualities of your knives already?
I don't have any so I'm going to write in general
Aesthetics-I like "pretty colorful things" (like the New West Knifeworks Fusionworks ones...gorgeous colored handles) but honestly, it doesn't matter.
Edge Quality/Retention-
Ease of Use-Easy to use is best?
Comfort-I don't know.

What grip do you use?
No idea.

What kind of cutting motion do you use?
No idea?

Where do you store them?
We were going to get a block but it depends what fits in the kitchenette we'll have once married.

Have you ever oiled a handle?
No but I'm sure I could learn! (I'm sure it's not that hard.)

What kind of cutting board(s) do you use?
I'm asking for a wooden one, though I think all we currently have is plastic.

For edge maintenance, do you use a strop, honing rod, pull through/other, or nothing?
My dad always used a honing rod so that's what I'm most familiar with.

Have they ever been sharpened?
I don't know how to sharpen but I could learn from my dad.

What is your budget?
Ummm...Under $400 for all? We are registering for them but I don't want people to think we're being "ridiculous", especially since we are both young and neither of us have cooked a ton.

What do you cook and how often?
I don't know; we'll probably be cooking lots of "cheap stuff" for a while. (Beans, rice, on-sale chicken, veggies/fruits as well). He likes stir fry or anything with soy sauce.

Special requests(Country of origin/type of wood/etc)?
I have teeny teeny hands, about 6" from base to tip, so anything with a ginormous handle is probably not going to work too well.

Thanks! Sorry...like I said, I know diddly squat. He's the chef out of the two of us but a.he also knows nothing about knives and b.I know I'll learn to cook as well. I was looking at the Zwilling JA Henckel (NOT the international!) or a Wustof but I know nothing.

bikehunter
05-03-2013, 11:09 PM
Welcome to the forums.

rhondarc
05-03-2013, 11:30 PM
Oh...I haven't cooked much at all, though I mostly use paring knives. We will also likely be cooking the freeze-it-and-forget-it type meals; slow-cooker meals. I don't know if that is much help but if it is, you all have the info.

chinacats
05-04-2013, 12:05 AM
I might start by suggesting a nice cutting board from the Boardsmith (http://www.theboardsmith.com/)...he is a vendor on this forum and whatever you choose will look great in your new home and will last forever if you take care of it.

I might also suggest looking around at some of these websites:
JKI (http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/)
Korin (http://korin.com/site/home.html)
Epicurean Edge (http://www.epicedge.com/).

All are fun sites to look around and trusted vendors here. Jon at JKI is particularly helpful answering questions from people of all skillsets. I would suggest stainless knives including a shorter gyuto (chef's knife) or maybe a santoku which has a slightly different shape. You could also find a complementary small knife at any of these sites

Cheers and Congratulations!

Phip
05-04-2013, 12:23 AM
With the greatest respect, you're just starting out marrying and don't appear to do much cooking, so to me the obvious choice is a set of poly cutting boards and an 8" Vitronox (Forschner) Fibrox chef's knife (gyuto). The knife has good ergonomics and decent steel, it costs $40, and it will never let you down. It's tons better than those dang Henkels and Wusthofs that all the department stores carry as "nice" knives. Argh!

rhondarc
05-04-2013, 11:56 AM
Yeah, we're not looking for the top top of the line, but something that cuts and works well. Neither of us know anything about knives so I figured this may be a good option to figure out what to get. We will HAVE to cook everything for the next few years as we'll be pretty poor (but hey...we're college students; we'll be poor when it's socially acceptable to be poor and then we'll be used to surviving on a budget!) so we will end up doing a big of cooking, just not anything major.

I just know whatever knife my mom uses to cut the majority of her food scares me. It takes too much pressure for me to cut with it well; does that mean it's too dull or that I'm just a chicken/strength-wise-weak and don't know how to use knives properly?

What knives are the "basic knives"? I know a chef's knife but what's the order from there?

chinacats
05-04-2013, 12:35 PM
The knife your mom uses likely just needs a good sharpening--realize that all knives will need to be sharpened at a point, but this can be done professionally a couple times a year or you can learn to sharpen and save even more money.

You really only need a couple of knives--2 or 3 unless you want to get into specialty knives. A decent size chef's knife, a paring knife and maybe a bread knife--if your knives stay sharp you really do not need a bread knife, but if you want one there are a few that people really like (see Mac (http://www.amazon.com/Mac-HMC-SB105-Bread-Knife/dp/B0031YK7DC) or Tojiro (http://www.cutleryandmore.com/tojiro/itk-bread-knife-p124765)). Most sets are sold to help companies unload unwanted knives to people who don't know better. Browse around and ask questions when you have them.

Cheers

bamin
05-04-2013, 01:47 PM
Check out this store on ebay as well. The vendor is very helpful and the prices are not at all high.

http://stores.ebay.com/BluewayJapan

RRLOVER
05-04-2013, 02:31 PM
It is Very Bad Luck to give or recieve a knife as a gift......I hope you are not superstitious:angel2: I have always make my family give me a dollar when I gave them a knife,as you can guess I am superstitious;)

cgul629
05-04-2013, 03:18 PM
I'm going to second what Phip said. Consider getting the Forschner Victorinox Fibrox knives. You can get them in a set with a block which makes a nice wedding gift and will cover all the basic knives. Those knives will serve you well, and if you wish to upgrade in the future you can do it a knife or two at a time and still use the block. I'm in the process of upgrading/adding to my fibrox knives, but they still get plenty of work.

You may also want to consider adding to the set with a a Japanese knife - like a smaller gyuto or santoku -Chinacats gave links to vendors who will help you get something suit you.

And congratulations on you upcoming wedding!

rhondarc
05-04-2013, 04:14 PM
Thanks! Yeah, neither of us are superstitious. That said, it will be likely that no one buys the knives for us and/or we will get money gifts so either way, we'll get a set. (We'll need it! We have nothing!)

I know knives need sharpening; my dad sharpens ours on occasion. I'll have to have someone in our area give me a lesson as the last time I tried sharpening metal tools, I killed my most used wood carving tool. (I'm an art student) Granted, that was a rounded tool but still. I'm sure I can learn from SOMEONE around here.

Thanks! I've heard Victorinox is a good brand; my dad has found a few of them at thrift shops so he's shared his excitement before.

chinacats
05-04-2013, 04:36 PM
Forschner/Victorinox are definitely great value knives. I think though that if you are going to consider these a wedding gift--either you buy or others buy for you that you may want to upgrade just a bit. Jon at JKI--if you call him on the phone he will spend a bit of time to has some really nice knives that aren't too expensive and will last a lifetime (so will the Victorinox). You can also buy stones from any of the vendors here and learn pretty good skills through some videos available. The skillset will transfer to your toolset as well so that may be a good place to start.

I use a few Victorinox knives (bread and boning knife) and they are great for the money. The chef's knife has quite a bit of belly to it though so make sure this is what you like--most Japanese blades have a slightly flatter profile more in the French tradition.

The Victorinox have two handle options, one is Fibrox which is black and kind of non-slip, they also have a rosewood that I believe looks very nice.

Cheers!

rhondarc
05-04-2013, 04:39 PM
Thanks. I just registered for the victorinox (ironically, cheaper than the Wustofs and Zwilling Henckels) and I'll look at the gyuto later.

What IS a gyuto? Whats the difference between gyuto and santoku (which I have heard of)? Do they cut different things? Do you handle them differently? I looked at those vendors online and the prices were all across the board...is there a suggestion of a place to start with?

One more question...cutting boards? What's the difference in materials? Is there an importance in the difference? Why wood vs poly? What's the difference in the thickness of the wood? Etc...? (Like I said, I know diddly squat.)

Thank you so much!

bamin
05-04-2013, 08:21 PM
A gytuo is the Japanese term for chef knife, the kanji for it mean "cow sword". They are patterned after French style chef knives rather than the German. A santoku can be used as a chef knife and some people prefer it because it can be used to easily scoop up whatever you cut. I can't really speak for its other benefits over a gyuto (never used one), I guess it comes down to personal taste.

When it comes to handling Japanese knives it comes down mainly to common sense. Don't put them in the dish washer, don't try to chop through frozen foods or bones with them. If you want to steel them, you need to use a smooth round ceramic hone, the ridged metal ones that are common will damage the edge. You also have to take the bevel into account, whether it is asymmetrical. The best place to start I think would probably be to contact Jon at JKI, he can suggest knives that are really tailored to your skills and needs.

Cutting boards are very important. The choice in material will play a big factor in determining how quickly your edges will dull. The best option is an end-grain wooden board because the wood fibers are directed parallel to the cutting edge of your knife and will cushion the impact of the edge with the board. The other option for wooden boards is edge-grain where the wood fibers are perpendicular to cutting edge, this will not do as good a job as the end-grain but its still better than poly. Poly is considered inferior to wood because it will cause your edges to dull faster than wood. Over time as it accumulates scratches from cutting you can have hygiene issue. This is due bacteria making their way into those scratches and once they are there it becomes difficult to kill them, this is not a problem with wood. Stay away from bamboo, glass, marble, etc. You should look at the BoardSmith website for further useful information.

rhondarc
05-04-2013, 08:58 PM
Thanks!

Though...you aren't really supposed to wash any knives in the dishwasher, are you?

In terms of cutting boards, what is the difference between something like:
http://www.target.com/p/architec-gripperwood-endgrain-acacia/-/A-10489824#?lnk=sc_qi_detaillink
or
http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?SKU=16976741&RN=2059& ?
The first one has end grain and the second has the edge-grain, correct?

Does the board thickness matter much?

xuz
05-04-2013, 11:25 PM
we'll get a set. (We'll need it! We have nothing!)

If I could go back, I wouldn't have bought anything that looks like this.
http://i41.tinypic.com/108clm0.jpg

Instead I would have just bought ONE like this.
http://i40.tinypic.com/24guknc.jpg
Well maybe not that particular one, but a chef's knife with good quality steel, balance, and ergonomics.

I didn't even touch most of those knives or the boning knife or the 3 pairing knives they throw in just for embellishments. But they sure do add to the price.

You'll really just need one knife to rule them all. A chef's knife.
But you might like to have a second knife (smaller paring knife), because you might look silly trying to peel an apple with 8" chef's knife.
But you may want a 3rd (Serrated/bread knife), because you eat French bread every other day, and you like to cut them yourself.


Besides, it'd be much more gratifying to buy a knife as you need them with your wife (as you cook more as a couple, because that's what couples do), than buy the whole shebang in one go and not have anything to look forward to.

xuz
05-04-2013, 11:49 PM
Re: the gyuuto vs santoku.
I could be completely wrong about this since it's anecdotal story that I've heard from here or from there.
(My Japanese neighbor or some such persons.)

Japanese people have gotten (from what point in history? I don't know) very particular about what knives they use for what task and on what raw material.
They'll have certain knives for cutting fish, and a different knives for preparing them.
They'll have one knife for cutting vegetables, and a different one for cutting different type of veggies.
I've heard that long ago, people used gyuto (牛刃 = a knife of bovine persuasion) for butchering and preparing beef, but have since been accepted as the Japanese version of chef's knife.

Basically, some people (probably marketing people from Shun or some such company) thought it would be good idea to get rid of all these distinctions, and find one knife that does everything pretty well. After all if Mr. Sakai can use only his chef's knife to create works of art as the Iron Chef, why shouldn't we? Thus came the santoku. Santoku (三徳) means three virtues, probably meaning that this knife can be used to deal with the three major food components (the fishes from the sea, the herbs from the mountains, and the livestocks from the fields) that have traditionally been relegated to different type of knives.

Functionally, I find both to be about equal and switch off between the two.
Gyuto are often single beveled (a sort of chisel grind) and often thicker and santoku are double beveled (like the western chef's knife) and thinner. I'm sure a search here will result in a ton of discussion about who prefers what type of knife.

chinacats
05-05-2013, 12:01 AM
Re: the gyuuto vs santoku.
I could be completely wrong about this since it's anecdotal story that I've heard from here or from there.
(My Japanese neighbor or some such persons.)

Japanese people have gotten (from what point in history? I don't know) very particular about what knives they use for what task and on what raw material.
They'll have certain knives for cutting fish, and a different knives for preparing them.
They'll have one knife for cutting vegetables, and a different one for cutting different type of veggies.
I've heard that long ago, people used gyuto (牛刃 = a knife of bovine persuasion) for butchering and preparing beef, but have since been accepted as the Japanese version of chef's knife.

Basically, some people (probably marketing people from Shun or some such company) thought it would be good idea to get rid of all these distinctions, and find one knife that does everything pretty well. After all if Mr. Sakai can use only his chef's knife to create works of art as the Iron Chef, why shouldn't we? Thus came the santoku. Santoku (三徳) means three virtues, probably meaning that this knife can be used to deal with the three major food components (the fishes from the sea, the herbs from the mountains, and the livestocks from the fields) that have traditionally been relegated to different type of knives.

Functionally, I find both to be about equal and switch off between the two.
Gyuto are often single beveled (a sort of chisel grind) and often thicker and santoku are double beveled (like the western chef's knife) and thinner. I'm sure a search here will result in a ton of discussion about who prefers what type of knife.

It was my understanding that the Japanese 'borrowed' the idea from the French during the Meiji Restoration period? I thought the original J-knives didn't include anything close to this 'modern chef's' blade?

xuz
05-05-2013, 12:21 AM
It was my understanding that the Japanese 'borrowed' the idea from the French during the Meiji Restoration period? I thought the original J-knives didn't include anything close to this 'modern chef's' blade?

You may very well be correct. I was originally going to say exactly what you said (the influx of western cultures after the shocking arrival of the black ships and later through the meiji ishin) quickly reformed many cultural and industrial aspects of Japan. But I thought the comments about Iron Chef and thumbing my nose at Shun would have been more entertaining to the young couple.

Don't mind me. I'm just an apostle of misinformation.:happymug:


p.s. rhondarc, I made the mistake of thinking you were your male counter part. (I need to read posts more carefully from now on!) My mistake about some of the gender specific comments in my previous posts. Also, congratulations on your union.

rhondarc
05-05-2013, 02:33 AM
I don't know. I'll talk it over with my fiance; we ARE going to be in a teeny place next year with a teeny kitchenette so it may make more sense anyway. (And if anyone asks why it's not on the list, we can use the superstitious excuse!) I will probably try to get those three knives anyway. I prefer to cut fruit/veggies with a paring knife (or a sharp serrated knife if it's a tomato or other fragile item) and I'm hoping to make bread to save some extra money as it's cheap and filling.

What exactly IS a boning knife?

Also, can anyone explain the cutting board question I asked above? I'm sure it's probably a little silly of a question but I really know nothing. [I've managed to burn pancakes on contact; my fiance has joked that he'll cook because his food is edible! ;) Really though, I can follow a recipe...but I need one terribly.]

In response to P.S.:And it's okay. I actually tend to use the universal He instead of him/her, besides, we all overlook something at some point. I'd gather the majority of the people on here are guys...it IS a knife forum after all.

Erilyn75
05-05-2013, 02:41 AM
My hands are only slightly bigger than yours and I find my Wusthofs heavy and clunky, which is what lead me to this forum. If you do decide to upgrade your knives later, I wouldn't recommend those at all.

Since I'm not an expert on knives, ill leave those recommendations to the more knowledgeable. However, I'd like to give you a few recommendations on other things for your kitchen so you're not wasting money like I have over the years.

First, as mentioned above, a good quality wood cutting board is a great investment. End grain is preferable but if you don't get one as a gift, get a good edge grain and upgrade later. If its taken care of it will last you forever. My step dad still has a cutting board from his teenage years. He's now in his mid 50s.

12" cast iron skillet (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Lodge-12-Cast-Iron-Skillet/5969633)! This really is one of those must have items. You can do practically anything with it and 12" isn't too big or too small. It's also very inexpensive. Just remember to keep it well seasoned and never use soap to wash it. If you maintain it, you'll be passing it down to your grand kids one day.

I LOVE the Tramontina (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-8-Piece-18-10-Stainless-Steel-Tri-Ply-Clad-Cookware-Set/19581112) cookware line (available at Walmart.com). I always recommend this brand to friends and family that are looking to replace their fastly worn out nonstick. Its perfect for us home cooks. Their stainless triply pots and pans are a great bang for your buck buy. I tested a 12" tramontina against my mother in laws all clad and couldn't find too much of a difference. Their 12" ceramic non stick pan. (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-Style-12-Porcelain-Enamel-Earth-Tone-Non-Stick-Fry-Pan/21190565) is really good too.

Enameled cast iron Dutch oven (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Lodge-Color-Enamel-and-Cast-Iron-6-qt.-Dutch-Oven-Blue/5716692) is great for so many things.

Duralex (http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-192822/Duralex-Lys-Clear-Stackable-Bowls-Set-of-10) stacking mixing bowls. Love these and they are only $40

Last but not least, my most favorite kitchen utensil - the spurtle (http://kitchencarvers.com/). It's a cross between a spatula and a spoon. I've given these to everyone I know and they all fall in love with them. I've got several sets as backups because only 2 people make these and I don't ever want to be without one. I use it for everything.


Those were just a few inexpensive things that will end up lasting you for many many years. Congrats on your upcoming marriage, I wish you all the best! :)

rhondarc
05-05-2013, 02:44 AM
Yeah; I tried holding a Wustof in the store and I was not the most keen on them. But as I haven't handled many knives, I couldn't really tell why. My fiance's hands aren't much bigger than mine either so at least we're not looking to please both giant and tiny at the same time.

Was the end-grain I posted okay?

I already registered for a cast iron skillet! I'm asking for the enamel one and if we use it a ton (which I'm guessing will be true), we'll get a normal one down the line. My fiance is convinced that cast iron isn't non-stick and is too much work so the enamel is a nice compromise for now.

I've been looking at the anolon anodized ones right now. My fiance is stuck on non-stick so to speak and like I said, he's the main cook for now! I looked at reviews and people seem to be pretty pleased with them, without them being the "traditional" non-stick. I'm also guessing we'll be getting some stoneware something as one of the ladies invited sells Pampered Chef and has already asked for a list of what we'd be interested in...definitely the stoneware as everything else has good equivalents elsewhere but PC does make nice stoneware.

Oh...yes, I registered for one of those (dutch oven) as well. Not an expensive Le Creuset, just a Lodge one, but I wouldn't complain if someone upgraded!

Awesome! I think we registered for stainless steel as we're both klutzes and us+glass is not a good thing...but they're definitely the stacking ones!

Ooo...that sounds interesting. I'll look at it.


Those were just a few inexpensive things that will end up lasting you for many many years. Congrats on your upcoming marriage, I wish you all the best!


Other note: What to look for in a steak knife? I heard the name Laguiole tossed around...I'm gathering that http://www.anthropologie.com/anthro/product/home-kitchen/073587.jsp is the brand being talking about but probably not the knives being discussed? I'd like a set of steak knives if possible because even if we don't eat much steak, they make great delicate veggie knifes and my family used our steak knives for anything partially tough.

bamin
05-05-2013, 06:42 AM
Thanks!

Though...you aren't really supposed to wash any knives in the dishwasher, are you?

In terms of cutting boards, what is the difference between something like:
http://www.target.com/p/architec-gripperwood-endgrain-acacia/-/A-10489824#?lnk=sc_qi_detaillink
or
http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?SKU=16976741&RN=2059& ?
The first one has end grain and the second has the edge-grain, correct?

Does the board thickness matter much?

Yup, that's right about the boards. Although I'm not sure acacia is a good wood for cutting on. Someone else will have to chime in on that.

Good steak knives that aren't super expensive are hard to come by. The link you posted for the Laguiole is the correct brand, but as you guessed not the right set. The ones that live up to the name are typically a few hundred dollar for a set of 4. In a steal knife you should look for something without too much flex in the blade and good steel, these will typically be non-serrated. You could take a look at what Victorinox has to offer, they have some sets for about $180. Of course, I've also heard people say that the nice smooth cuts made by expensive steak knifes are unnecessary and that the cheaper serrated are fine since the food is about to go into your mouth anyways.

daddy yo yo
05-05-2013, 10:11 AM
tough, this is! especially because you're asking weenies like us who easily spend US$ 400 for a single knife (or even multiples of that amount)! :lol2:

anyway, i gave my mother in law her first real knife last christmas (together with an end-grain oak board). the first thing that i would consider a "knife" in her kitchen. it was a 7" cooking knife from sabatier's authentique range.

given your experience with cooking and experience/willingness (this might be the wrong word, but hey, english isn't my mother tongue) to care for a knife, i only see stainless steel as material. i believe you can't do much wrong with sabatier, zwilling, wüsthof/dreizack, or wmf. those are good, reliable knives. nothing that will kick a** or be super-duper-über-sharp, but still, those will be good knives. i inherited my mum's knife block when she passed away, a knife block full of wüsthof/dreizack and zwilling "spitzenklasse" knives, and this is by far better than any cheap stuff. but, of course, there's always smth better... but "better" always comes at a price...

i'd go for a chef's knife/gyuto in probably 8" and a smaller paring knife/petty. with those 2 you should do just fine!

rhondarc
05-05-2013, 10:14 AM
Well, I wouldn't be looking for super nice ones, just ones that cut easily. We had some bottom of the line serrated ones for a while and they worked pretty well. My parents have since upgraded to nicer finely-serrated completely ones and they work much nicer. (They almost look like they have no serration but it's definitely there.) Would the Laguiole ones I posted be similar to the Victorinox or what? Or is that a no? I'm just looking for something that doesn't require a TON of sawing at the meat.

If anyone could comment on the Acacia, that would be great.
And what is a boning knife?

rhondarc
05-05-2013, 10:21 AM
Oh, and I doubt anyone here is looking for it but the block set of the Forschner Victorinox is only 185 at Macy's...the 11 piece one with steak knives. That's about half what BB&B has them at.

Dardeau
05-05-2013, 02:51 PM
Iron cookware is nonstick, if properly seasoned. Rub the entire thing down with olive oil and put it in a 400 degree oven until it is black and glossy. Once it is seasoned you should not wash it wih soap and water unless you plan on reseasoning it. To clean just wipe it out with a clean towel. If you burn something to it, heat it on the stovetop and add a small amount of water to deglaze it and scrape with a wood spoon, or scrub it with a towel and some salt. The more you use an iron or steel pan the better, and more non stick it will get. On the subject of knives, the K Sabatier knives have really comfy handles for small hands, and are a pretty good deal for the price, and are aesthetically pleasing as well. The only drawback is they have the euro style finger guard that will make sharpening difficult down the road.

Lefty
05-05-2013, 02:51 PM
I might have missed it, but how soon is the wedding? Also, are you already out "on your own"? If not, are you cooking to get the hang of things?

I like that you came in and asked, making sure you get something good. Because that's really cool to me, I'd be up for sending you a free Forschner Chef knife (used, but in pretty nice shape), a Global sheepsfoot "parer", and likely a couple other knives in similar condition. I guarantee they'll all be very decent blades. All I'd ask is for you to cover shipping. :)

Let me know if this interests you, and I can likely get it all done mid-week.

Dardeau
05-05-2013, 02:53 PM
On second thought, maybe 350 or 325 if you don't have a commercial hood. I forget about this kind of thing at my own house and set off my smoke alarm way too often.

xuz
05-05-2013, 03:45 PM
I'd take up Lefty's offer in a heartbeat.
Not just because they are nice knives, but because you know they'll come sharp!!!
What a generous man.


Cast iron being "non-stick" is a relative term, in my opinion. You still need to butter it up, or use oil. Modern non-stick coatings require pretty much nothing. Heat it up, drop that egg in, done. Plus cast iron takes a long time to heat up, which is a hassle. Also, they tend to retain flavors. So if you decided to pan fry something like a mackerel in one, you'll be eating fish flavored scrambled egg for a while. On the other hand, some of the best tasting eggs, bacons, steaks, and bratwursts in my life has been cooked and seared in cast iron.

Speaking of steaks, I'd have no problem with serrated knives. As my mother is my witness, steak knives go dull fast. Why? Because more often than not you serve your steak on a porcelain/ceramic/china dish, and 1 meal with porcelain dish ruin more knives than a thousand tomatoes. Serrated knives are pretty much impervious to these type of damages. Plus, if you sear your steaks so they develop a crisp skin, serration gives a nice bite.

rhondarc
05-05-2013, 05:52 PM
Oh, I know it is non-stick but my fiance is not so certain so I figured enamel would be a good way to ease him in to it. Besides, as we're in the South, I'm sure I can find one at a thrift store or yardsale...it's probably cheaper and more non-stick than new!

Where would I look for the Sabatiers? I just looked some up; does the blade material matter much? What exactly about the euro style finger guard will make sharpening difficult down the road?

We are not out on our own. We will not be until towards the end of June, after we get married as we're both still in college. (Also, we won't "really" be completely out until the end of the summer when we move down to my college. We'll be living right next door to his parents and just a few streets away from mine.) But, when I get "home" for the summer, between now and our wedding, I will be cooking in order to learn.

Aww, thanks! I wanted to make sure I knew what I was getting as it's an area I am completely useless in and the registry was one of my jobs. (He's not much of a shopper.) That would be marvelous but it may be better to wait a week or two if possible. I'm currently still at college and I already don't know how I'm going to fit everything back in two cars to get it home! (I'm an art student so I have more stuff than the normal college student , and truthfully, more than most of my art student friends.) I'll be home in just over a couple weeks; we end later than most. I'm a little afraid they'd arrive here at my college and I'd be gone or they'd arrive at my house without me there, especially since you're in Canada, if I gather correctly. (I've had some things shipped from Canada and the timing is anywhere from a week to two weeks, at least from Saskatchewan, I believe.) Would it be possible to PM me a shipping estimate if you can guess? I'd have to put it in my budget so I know what I have to save this month.

On the steak knives note, would you guys gather that the languiole ones I posted were okay (http://www.anthropologie.com/anthro/product/home-tabletop-dinnerware/073587.jsp) or would Forschner ones be better? The art student in me loves color and to be honest, not many good cooking tools are colorful so I take every chance if it works just as well. (Yes, my fiance is okay with the color...most kitchen stuff is not colorful so he gets his way there about 90% of the time. Plus, the chance of us eating steak is none-to-slim for a good while.)

cgul629
05-06-2013, 04:45 PM
I vote that you go with those steak knives from Anthopologie. They will work just fine, and if you want to add some color to your kitchen tools that's a great way to do it.

77kath
05-06-2013, 05:07 PM
The Laguiole site has these in a wooden tray for €12. So you might be able to find them somewhere in the Americas in the tray (block? Box?)

Mitbud
05-06-2013, 05:47 PM
[QUOTE=xuz;204896]I'd take up Lefty's offer in a heartbeat.
Not just because they are nice knives, but because you know they'll come sharp!!!
What a generous man.

+1 on taking Lefty up on his offer. Gift from a wise man.

rhondarc
05-06-2013, 07:32 PM
77Kath, where did you find them on their site? I could not find them anywhere else! And, to be honest, if no one buys us anything like that, I'll probably go on ebay; I saw several similar ones on ebay but it's a little tacky to put ebay items on a registry. ;) (It's too bad though...there are such fabulous items there. You know you were raised frugally when you find yourself wishing ebay, Ross, and Marshalls had registries! :lol2:)

77kath
05-06-2013, 07:53 PM
Googled Laguiole knives and got their website. it's on the fourth page, near the bottom. The one without the tray is also there. They are certainly more interesting than my Wustie steak knives.

rhondarc
05-06-2013, 08:11 PM
Odd. I have searched through their website and couldn't find anything! I tried googling it and still, nothing. Is there a link to where you found them? I found some on Amazon as well; there seem to be two levels of quality as some are running $50-$70 where the others, very similar looking, are running $250. I wonder why.

77kath
05-06-2013, 08:15 PM
http://www.laguiole-attitude.com/en/index.php?controller=search&orderby=position&orderway=desc&search_query=laguiole+knives&gclid=CPDWz5HbgrcCFUFo4AodJ1IAIw&13042af98805856547e5b971fdea067b=%2BqKcLpF3UExJQ%2 BMezU3D7tjJ8MKBQXN2%2BT86S0bpP4lyOf3bgKzxXIPpg8XGV 1SZgP7o2U5wkMSX18%2BJ3oLAwoFjJDVKGN%2Bx6xZX2L%2Fhj SS8hB1eO8SsYz%2FvZMJC6YoZvzucziFIYwCY0O3dO3AhDSI3I a3tjHrVVUhSiCTsq%2FM%3D000115&__utma=174467647.1627954696.1367874121.1367874121. 1367884084.2&__utmb=174467647.5.10.1367884084&__utmc=174467647&__utmz=174467647.1367884084.2.2.utmgclid%3DCK-ez6bVgrcCFYtT4AoddhYAWg%7Cutmccn%3D%28not+set%29%7 Cutmcmd%3D%28not+set%29

77kath
05-06-2013, 08:17 PM
Plus a lot more. They claim to be the official web store. The name of the line seems to be Attitude.

xuz
05-06-2013, 08:33 PM
Googled Laguiole knives and got their website. it's on the fourth page, near the bottom. The one without the tray is also there. They are certainly more interesting than my Wustie steak knives.

They do not seem to be the same knives.
http://www.anthropologie.com/anthro/product/home-kitchen/073587.jsp
http://www.laguiole-attitude.com/en/cutlery-set/128-ambiance-presentation-box-with-6-knives.html
http://www.laguiole-attitude.com/en/cutlery-set/125-presentation-box-with-6-vibrantly-colored-knives.html

One says steak knives, the other table knives.
One has knives with 3 pins, other with 1 pin.

As to which is better, I can't tell you.
They do look pretty though.

rhondarc
05-06-2013, 09:02 PM
Odd. I'm looking exactly where you checked (Googled "Laguiole knives", checked the first 4 pages) and I don't see them anywhere on their page!

rhondarc
05-06-2013, 10:41 PM
Whoops; just saw that. To be honest, I'm a tad nervous that those ARE so much cheaper that they're not the real brand, esp since they have "attitude" after it. I think I'm going to stick with the first ones; if no one buys them for us then I'll get a set off ebay that comes with a wooden box.

Thank you all for your help. If we did end up buying a gyuto, what would be good options? Gyuto or Santoku?
'

rhondarc
05-08-2013, 02:14 AM
Oh, I guess at this point this could theoretically be redirected into the "not knife related" but if anyone has suggestions on kitchen items...like, what is completely useless and what actually makes sense to buy (for relatively new chefs with a teeny kitchen, or the lasts-forever-for-when-you-have-a-big-kitchen)? I figure most of you guys must like to cook if you're into kitchen knives ;)

Colorado_cutter
05-08-2013, 11:02 AM
Oh, I guess at this point this could theoretically be redirected into the "not knife related" but if anyone has suggestions on kitchen items...like, what is completely useless and what actually makes sense to buy (for relatively new chefs with a teeny kitchen, or the lasts-forever-for-when-you-have-a-big-kitchen)? I figure most of you guys must like to cook if you're into kitchen knives ;)

Cast iron skillets. Inexpensive, last a lifetime and more, cook really well. I've got a range of sizes, but mostly use just two: the 12 inch and the 6 1/2 inch. The 12 inch is a bit of a behemoth, but when you're pressed for space, you can just store it on the range top.
http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-L10SK3-12-Inch-Pre-Seasoned-Skillet/dp/B00006JSUB
Once you get them, scavenge thrift stores or what have you to find lids to fit.

Everybody's definition of useless will vary, but I would say pretty much anything that only does one thing isn't earning its space. Popcorn popper, for instance. Use the big cast iron skillet. Garlic press? Use your chef knife. Food processor? Use your chef knife. The nice thing about nice knives is that they obviate a bunch of other stuff that people seem compelled to buy and/or give you.

Mixing bowls are super-handy. A stock pot and colander, also handy. A saucepan or two. People seem to have way too many of these, not sure what compels them.

As far as electric gadgets/appliances go, I'm old school. I think the only electric appliances we've got are a coffeemaker, a microwave, an immersion blender, a regular blender, and a mixer, and that's in a big kitchen. Oh, and a couple of grinders (not essential)- one for coffee and one for spices. When I was in a very small kitchen, of that list I only had the blender and the coffeemaker (and it was a small one). I generally used the small cast iron to heat things up, like leftovers etc. I use the big cast iron as a toaster, but that's probably a bit too hair-shirt for most folks.

Salty dog
05-08-2013, 11:23 AM
I'm with Mario. You may not be superstitious but the knife gods are.
I'm telling ya, you need as much mojo as possible to live the rest of your lives together.

dannynyc
05-08-2013, 01:21 PM
Careful -- knife obsessions can get in the way of a perfectly good marriage.

rhondarc
05-08-2013, 07:24 PM
One other question: immersion blender vs. blender vs. stand mixer vs. food processer vs. hand mixer. What's the deal? What is useful, what is not useful, which are useful and which are useless/accomplish-tasks-the-other-does?

And neither of us are obsessed with knives; I came here to find out what was good as neither if us know anything about them.

Johnny.B.Good
05-10-2013, 12:32 AM
Oh, I guess at this point this could theoretically be redirected into the "not knife related" but if anyone has suggestions on kitchen items...like, what is completely useless and what actually makes sense to buy (for relatively new chefs with a teeny kitchen, or the lasts-forever-for-when-you-have-a-big-kitchen)? I figure most of you guys must like to cook if you're into kitchen knives ;)

This is an old article from the NY Times that I think is worth a read given your situation.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/09/dining/09mini.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

Best of luck with everything!

don
05-10-2013, 01:42 AM
Solid article on what's essential. Though I'd think that food processor is non-essential as well. All the items you listed (immersion blender, blender, stand mixer, food processor, hand mixer) have some utility, but it really depends on what you cook. But since you stated cheap foods and stir fries, these electronic equipment aren't necessary and take up a lot of space (you mentioned a tiny kitchen).

As for knives, the Forschner/Victorinox recommendations are good. While they may not be the most gift like of knives, they are incredible practical and very reasonable knives. Like others, I agree that you don't want to buy a block or a set. Buy a chefs, paring, and bread knife. If you want a knife with a smaller handle, then look for a small chefs/gyuto or santoku for yourself as well. Also, buy a wet stone to keep your knives sharp.

Since you mentioned making bread, are you looking to make country loafs or your standard sandwich loaves? If you're looking to make country loaves, then register for either a Lodge combo cooker or a 5 - 6 qt dutch oven. You can make some pretty amazing bread with those cookers. And they can also be used for soups, stews, and braises too.

Congrats on your wedding!

rhondarc
05-10-2013, 09:51 PM
Thanks so much! That article was pretty good. I registered for a (cheaper) ninja blender so I think we're set as far as a food processor goes, if need be. I'd agree though it's not necessary as I think my mom only brings hers out a few times a year. I'll probably still ask for a stand mixer as I can't cook but I can bake well. (And if need be, it *can* stay at my parents house while we have the ultra-tiny kitchen.)

I'm taking Lefty up on his offer and registering for a bread knife. I think my dad has wet stones for sharpening; when I left for college, he started taking up shaving with a straight razor so either he'll have extras or know where to get one.

I was thinking probably sandwich loaves but I'm not real picky. I think we've already registered for a 5-6qt dutch oven, actually.

Thanks!

Everyone on here is so nice and helpful. Thank you so much as I knew next to nothing.