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View Full Version : One Recipe. Only one. And you vouch for it.



mr drinky
05-09-2013, 12:15 AM
We all have certain 'recipes' that produce our go-to meals: those dishes that we make when we want a sure bet for guests or when we just want something easy, tasty, and amazing for ourselves. These are the meals you try to feed others and want to pass down to your kids.

I don't care if you created the recipe on your own, your grandmother handed it down to you, you picked it up at your restaurant, or got it from some cookbook or magazine. It's just about good food.

Post one recipe that you will 100% vouch for as being amazing -- this is your time to evangelize. And yes, I know that we all have many good dishes to share, but you need to self edit here: ONLY ONE. Please take a photo of the recipe page, give a link, or provide some cooking instructions. And maybe tell us what is so good about it. I'll post my contribution in a day or two.

We have a lot of amazing members here, and I know we make a lot of great food.

k.

Johnny.B.Good
05-09-2013, 12:17 AM
Excellent idea.

Now, what to post...

boomchakabowwow
05-09-2013, 12:22 AM
freaking brilliant..MR D!!

i know what i am gonna do..i just got to wait for the weekend, so i can take a pic. hahaha..FUN. so many pro cooks here..i'm nervous.

my dish is uber simple..but NONE of my friends can make an edible version.

stereo.pete
05-09-2013, 12:35 AM
Thomas Keller's Fried Chicken from Ad Hoc, hands down an unbelievable dish every time! I'll take a photo of the recipe tomorrow.

mr drinky
05-09-2013, 01:06 AM
Thomas Keller's Fried Chicken from Ad Hoc, hands down an unbelievable dish every time! I'll take a photo of the recipe tomorrow.

Interesting. My second choice was a Keller recipe from that same book, but I am going to submit Molly Stevens' roast chicken pieces Dijonnaise. Cooked it for the first time in November and I have made it about 8 times since. It's easy, and the sauce that comes out of it is like crack cocaine.

Again, I will post more info in a day or two.

k.

Chefdog
05-09-2013, 01:17 AM
Do we have to give measurements, cooking times, temperatures etc? While this is obviously the way most of the world cooks, those of us who cook for a living almost never use recipes like that except for baking and pastries. We deal in ratios and techniques and the recipes we do write down wouldnt do much good to the average non-professional.

That said, all the Thomas Keller talk made me remember another simple, yet delicious recipe of his. The Lemon Sabayon tart with pinenut crust from The French Laundry Cookbook is great.

knyfeknerd
05-09-2013, 01:25 AM
2: All beef patties
Special sauce
lettuce
cheese
pickles
onion
sesame seed bun

mr drinky
05-09-2013, 01:29 AM
Do we have to give measurements, cooking times, temperatures etc? While this is obviously the way most of the world cooks, those of us who cook for a living almost never use recipes like that except for baking and pastries. We deal in ratios and techniques and the recipes we do write down wouldnt do much good to the average non-professional.

That said, all the Thomas Keller talk made me remember another simple, yet delicious recipe of his. The Lemon Sabayon tart with pinenut crust from The French Laundry Cookbook is great.

Quick answer. For the pro cooks, you don't need to provide all the nitty gritty details -- just enough for inspiration.

k.

panda
05-09-2013, 03:39 AM
i'm eating a big mac right now actually after a long shift. except no cheese xtra pickle xtra onion (gotta love those reconstituted onions!)

Dream Burls
05-09-2013, 10:01 AM
2: All beef patties
Special sauce
lettuce
cheese
pickles
onion
sesame seed bun

LOL :biggrin:

skiajl6297
05-09-2013, 10:11 AM
I'd have to go with my summertime brunch go-to. Eggs Benedict, Maryland Style.

Long story short, instead of english muffin, the base is a local tart panko breaded fried green tomato (high heat so still pretty sturdy inside) but nicely warmed through.
Replace canadian bacon with local virginia ham or pancetta, sauteed/fried until slightly crispy.
On top a local perfectly poached large farm egg with a gorgeously vibrant runny orange yolk.
Top egg with fresh jumbo lump maryland crabmeat, delicately turned with fresh minced garden chive and cold steamed eastern shore corn, and topped with a homemade old bay hollendaise.

Why it's amazing? FGT = crunch and tart, ham gives texture, fat, umami, runny poached egg is just gorgeous and silky, local crab meat is pefectly sweet and tender and seafoody, local chives give color and hint of onion, corn gives incredible sweet complement to crab, and old bay hollendaise, because it is just a part of my soul growing up here. All together, one big messy bite = summertime in maryland.

Credit is years of living in this area, and countless versions of traditional eggs benedict with bits and pieces of this, e.g. traditional with crab, or traditional with old bay, etc. I'm sure it's been done before, but this to me, in a nutshell, is a perfect maryland summertime brunch, and the dish that I would request on my deathbed, assuming somehow I was dying during that brief summertime window when the stars align and I can get all of these things in optimal condition from farmers market. Also, I am not big into even numbers, so when I do this, I have 3 towers, not the eternally traditional two. :hungry:

skiajl6297
05-09-2013, 10:14 AM
PS - this MD Style benedict pairs extraordinarily well with an old-bay rimmed bloody mary, replacing the traditional celery stalk with a spicy pickled green bean.

Lucretia
05-09-2013, 10:58 AM
We got this recipe from Bon Apetit magazine about 20 years ago. It didn't have the salt or liqueur in it, I think they add but aren't mandatory. It's just about the perfect chocolate cake, IMO. Dense, moist, and rich. It's also one of the easiest to make cakes in the world and almost foolproof. (Leaving the wax paper on the bottom or overcooking a little bit are recoverable. Dropping the cake onto the bottom of the oven when you take it out to cover it with foil isn't so great, but if you have the ingredients you can have another whipped up and in the oven in minutes.)

Almost Flourless Chocolate Cake

10 oz bittersweet (not unsweetened) or semisweet chocolate, chopped
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
5 large eggs
1 1/4 cup sugar
5 Tbsp all purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
A couple glugs of liqueur (Grand Marnier & Chambord are nice--use what you like)
A couple pinches salt

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Butter and flour 10 inch springform pan, and line the bottom with waxed paper. Melt together chocolate & butter, remove from heat and stir in liqueur.

Beat eggs and sugar in large bowl until well blended and starting to thicken. Sift flour, baking powder, and salt over eggs and fold in. Gradually fold in chocolate mixture, then pour into prepared pan.

Bake for 20 minutes, then cover pan with foil and bake about 30 minutes longer, until tester comes out with moist crumbs still attached (don't overcook!)

Cool in pan on rack (cake will fall). Remove cake from pan (don't forget to take off the waxed paper.) Dust with powdered sugar and cocoa.

Good with ice cream, whipped cream, unwhipped cream, fruit, or naked (you, the cake, or both.)

Jim
05-09-2013, 11:24 AM
Here is one I posted on B&B a few years ago- never fails to please. A few guys tried this out with great results, the only failure was those that hurried the browning of the tomatoes and rushed the cooking.

OK lets get started~

What you need:
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16099 (http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/showimage.php?i=16099&original=1&c=78)


3- 28 ounces cans of plum tomatoes, San Marzano is best.

1 cup of chopped onion

4 cloves of garlic chopped

A large handful of fresh basil

2 lbs of veal, cubed

1 tsp of red pepper flake

1/2 teaspoon salt

3 oz EVOO

Dice, slice and cube everything to start.

Heat oil in large enough pot to fit all the tomatoes with plenty of room left over.
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16101

http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16102
Brown cubed veal and reserve.

http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16100
Lightly brown onions and half way through add garlic, reserve.
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16103

http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16104
Brown 2 cans of tomatoes, Don't rush this part!
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16105
Add onions and garlic red pepper and salt.
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16106
Add the rest of the tomatoes.
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16111
Simmer on low for many hours, add water as needed.
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16107
(After 3 hours)
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16108
(After 6 hours)
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16109
Add reserved meat and Basil to sauce, cook one more hour.
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16110

http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16112
Cook Pasta.
http://www.badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=16113
Enjoy!

Dream Burls
05-09-2013, 11:35 AM
I just had an idea: what about a KKF Cookbook?

franzb69
05-09-2013, 11:37 AM
I just had an idea: what about a KKF Cookbook?

+1

skiajl6297
05-09-2013, 11:39 AM
Jim - that looks awesome. Does the meat come out braised but intact? Thinking of trying this (and also feeding to my toddler) who loved everything pasta - just curious about how the chunks turn out.

ejd53
05-09-2013, 11:44 AM
I make a ragu bolognese that is very similar to this (not as much tomato and a little bit of cream at the end), and it is always killer, provided you give it the time to reduce properly.

mr drinky
05-09-2013, 11:45 AM
I just had an idea: what about a KKF Cookbook?

heldentenor has started working on a cookbook. Here is the thread (http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/7571-The-KKF-Cookbook-Thread?highlight=kkf+cookbook).

If this thread inspires anyone, I am sure he would welcome additional submissions.

k.

DeepCSweede
05-09-2013, 11:45 AM
I just had an idea: what about a KKF Cookbook?

There was one in progress about a year ago, but it seems to have dropped off the map. There was supposed to be recipes along with the knives and pictures of the work in progress with the knives.

Lefty
05-09-2013, 12:27 PM
I'll search, but it's more inspiration à la Adam Perry Lang.

Jim
05-09-2013, 01:00 PM
Jim - that looks awesome. Does the meat come out braised but intact? Thinking of trying this (and also feeding to my toddler) who loved everything pasta - just curious about how the chunks turn out.


Yes the meat stays together as they are only in the sauce for about an hour. If you wanted to you could substitute ground veal as well.. like most of these things it's just a place to start.

Craig
05-09-2013, 01:19 PM
My go-to for guests is the forum bird, but that's been done to death around here, so I'll go with Coniglio All' Ischitana. Something about rabbit in garlicky tomato sauce just makes me happy. I like it with lots of thick sauce and a hunk of bread to mop it up.

A go-to around the house that I do a lot I ripped off from some seafood place I went to in Vancouver. Basically all it is is sauteed chicken (they used breasts, I use thighs) and mushrooms in a Hoisin sauce wrapped in lettuce. It takes like 10 minutes and makes the wife happy. Reheats well too.

Zwiefel
05-11-2013, 02:21 AM
Home made popcorn.

1 handful of popcorn kernels, unless you prefer more. or less.
enough oil to coat the kernels and have a small pool underneath.
I like EVOO, and grapeseed oil, esp lemon-infused varieties...though I did have 1 garlic infused oil that was suprerb (most of them are awful)
garlic salt, to taste. Must be applied immediately after removing from heat.
pan about 12-15X the volume of the corn you are using, about 4 qt for one z-sized handful.

place 'corn and oil in pan with loose-fitting lid over high-heat
pop until popping slows to 1 kernel/s....-ish
dump in bowl, immediately salt...stainless steel mixing bowl is traditional

total time: 10-ish minutes...if you clean your pan while it's hot.

Been enjoying and developing this recipe/approach for nearly 20 years, hope you enjoy it too!

stopbarking
05-11-2013, 08:44 AM
Home made popcorn.

1 handful of popcorn kernels, unless you prefer more. or less.
enough oil to coat the kernels and have a small pool underneath.
I like EVOO, and grapeseed oil, esp lemon-infused varieties...though I did have 1 garlic infused oil that was suprerb (most of them are awful)
garlic salt, to taste. Must be applied immediately after removing from heat.
pan about 12-15X the volume of the corn you are using, about 4 qt for one z-sized handful.

place 'corn and oil in pan with loose-fitting lid over high-heat
pop until popping slows to 1 kernel/s....-ish
dump in bowl, immediately salt...stainless steel mixing bowl is traditional

total time: 10-ish minutes...if you clean your pan while it's hot.

Been enjoying and developing this recipe/approach for nearly 20 years, hope you enjoy it too!

Replace your garlic salt with vinegar powder and Maldon salt and you've got my recipe. Salt and vinegar everything!

bprescot
05-14-2013, 04:46 PM
Funnily enough, my true go-to (especially for a crowd where I need to truly entertain as well as cook) would also be a Bolognese. I started with this recipe, (http://fxcuisine.com/Default.asp?Display=150) and have customized from there, but it's rarely the same thing twice. I always skip the celery, usually skip the liver, and often sub the meat (just use a salty meat then a meaty meat). It's always a hit, probably because everyone hears "bolognese" and then expects Prego "Meat" Sauce.

Anton
05-14-2013, 06:07 PM
My Chiles Rellenos.. If only they took a quarter of the time they take to make!

Bill13
05-14-2013, 06:13 PM
Thomas Keller's Fried Chicken from Ad Hoc, hands down an unbelievable dish every time! I'll take a photo of the recipe tomorrow.

Have this cookbook, now I need to make this recipe tomorrow night! MMMMM fried chicken with some redskin potato salad.

knyfeknerd
05-14-2013, 06:20 PM
The Pommes Boulangere from Coliccio's Craft of Cooking is so badass. It's a PITA to peel a bunch of fingerling potatoes, but it's sooooooooooooooooooooooo worth it.

Bill13
05-14-2013, 06:22 PM
Home made popcorn.

1 handful of popcorn kernels, unless you prefer more. or less.
enough oil to coat the kernels and have a small pool underneath.
I like EVOO, and grapeseed oil, esp lemon-infused varieties...though I did have 1 garlic infused oil that was suprerb (most of them are awful)
garlic salt, to taste. Must be applied immediately after removing from heat.
pan about 12-15X the volume of the corn you are using, about 4 qt for one z-sized handful.

place 'corn and oil in pan with loose-fitting lid over high-heat
pop until popping slows to 1 kernel/s....-ish
dump in bowl, immediately salt...stainless steel mixing bowl is traditional

total time: 10-ish minutes...if you clean your pan while it's hot.

Been enjoying and developing this recipe/approach for nearly 20 years, hope you enjoy it too!

I do this too. One trick I use is I cover the pan with a pizza screen so the steam can escape easier. Makes for more excitement and a louder popping noise which is fun too.

Zwiefel
05-14-2013, 06:44 PM
I do this too. One trick I use is I cover the pan with a pizza screen so the steam can escape easier. Makes for more excitement and a louder popping noise which is fun too.
Yup, this idea was JUST mentioned in the Popcorn thread LoL started. can't believe after 15 years I hadn't thought of this!

sachem allison
05-15-2013, 02:23 AM
The Pommes Boulangere from Coliccio's Craft of Cooking is so badass. It's a PITA to peel a bunch of fingerling potatoes, but it's sooooooooooooooooooooooo worth it.

scrubbie will take those peels right off sandpaper works well too just, rinse real good.

Bill13
05-15-2013, 09:48 AM
My 14 year old son thought of it! I high fived him once we tried it out.

Lucretia
05-15-2013, 10:06 AM
Picked up some Italian sausage at the farmer's market the other day and tried Jim's sauce recipe with it. It was great! I really like the effect browning the tomatoes has on the flavor. Thanks, Jim!

Jim
05-15-2013, 10:49 AM
Picked up some Italian sausage at the farmer's market the other day and tried Jim's sauce recipe with it. It was great! I really like the effect browning the tomatoes has on the flavor. Thanks, Jim!
Great to hear..Nona would be happy...:thumbsup:

Zwiefel
05-15-2013, 11:00 AM
Picked up some Italian sausage at the farmer's market the other day and tried Jim's sauce recipe with it. It was great! I really like the effect browning the tomatoes has on the flavor. Thanks, Jim!

I love that effect as well. I've been using it for my "5-minute marinara" some years. Here's a vid from FB:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=1239959977037&set=vb.144012669414&type=3

sw2geeks
05-15-2013, 07:19 PM
Bacon Weave Meatloaf stuffed with cheese is one of my go too recipes for company.

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/09/10/13/24/ISrjk.St.117.jpg

http://www.dfw.com/2012/09/10/678711/weekend-chef-bacon-wrapped-meatloaf.html

stevenStefano
05-15-2013, 07:27 PM
Chilli. Probably not terribly authentic but I've tried a few different ways and stuck with one and of all the things I ever cook, it's by far my favourite and with others who have tried it too.

Lucretia
05-15-2013, 07:36 PM
Bacon Weave Meatloaf stuffed with cheese is one of my go too recipes for company.

http://www.dfw.com/2012/09/10/678711/weekend-chef-bacon-wrapped-meatloaf.html

It doesn't come out too shabby when you bake it in a loaf pan with bacon laid on top, either. A fine and dandy recipe!

rahimlee54
05-15-2013, 07:39 PM
We got this recipe from Bon Apetit magazine about 20 years ago. It didn't have the salt or liqueur in it, I think they add but aren't mandatory. It's just about the perfect chocolate cake, IMO. Dense, moist, and rich. It's also one of the easiest to make cakes in the world and almost foolproof. (Leaving the wax paper on the bottom or overcooking a little bit are recoverable. Dropping the cake onto the bottom of the oven when you take it out to cover it with foil isn't so great, but if you have the ingredients you can have another whipped up and in the oven in minutes.)

Almost Flourless Chocolate Cake

10 oz bittersweet (not unsweetened) or semisweet chocolate, chopped
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
5 large eggs
1 1/4 cup sugar
5 Tbsp all purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
A couple glugs of liqueur (Grand Marnier & Chambord are nice--use what you like)
A couple pinches salt

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Butter and flour 10 inch springform pan, and line the bottom with waxed paper. Melt together chocolate & butter, remove from heat and stir in liqueur.

Beat eggs and sugar in large bowl until well blended and starting to thicken. Sift flour, baking powder, and salt over eggs and fold in. Gradually fold in chocolate mixture, then pour into prepared pan.

Bake for 20 minutes, then cover pan with foil and bake about 30 minutes longer, until tester comes out with moist crumbs still attached (don't overcook!)

Cool in pan on rack (cake will fall). Remove cake from pan (don't forget to take off the waxed paper.) Dust with powdered sugar and cocoa.

Good with ice cream, whipped cream, unwhipped cream, fruit, or naked (you, the cake, or both.)

Do you think this would work with almond flour? I have an inlaw that is gluten free coming and I am not really sure what to make for dessert.

mr drinky
05-16-2013, 12:27 AM
First of all, the number of dishes in this thread has me salivating and wanting to cook a lot more. I am going to do my best and try most of them. I may fail and not make them all, but it will be a tasty failure.

As for my submission, I am choosing Molly Stevens' Roast Chicken Pieces Dijonnaise. I must say, however, that this recipe was not one that I would have normally chosen. I think it was maybe the descriptor of Dijonnaise -- it sounds sort of clichéed and commercial. Anyhow, I was borrowing Justin0505's Fowler honesuki and looking for different recipes that called for breaking down a chicken, so I chose this one one evening. Since then (Nov 2012) I have made it around ten times. It's easy, extremely tasty, and my wife loves it. She calls the resulting sauce of mustard, creme fraiche, chicken fat, and dry vermouth her crack cocaine soup.

The active time for this recipe is very minimal (around 20 mins); you just have to prepare a bit ahead of time as it needs 1.5 hours for the chicken to marinate in the mustard. Btw, this reminds that I should try a Lyonnaise chicken dish with a red wine vinegar sauce. I had it in Lyon a few years back and it was fabulous. Side track.

So here are the photos of the recipe pages from the cookbook.

k.

Edit: My only recommendation is to use the best quality creme fraiche you can get. That alouette stuff sucked and didn't work hardly at all.

Lucretia
05-17-2013, 03:53 PM
Do you think this would work with almond flour? I have an inlaw that is gluten free coming and I am not really sure what to make for dessert.

Don't know what effect the almond flour would have, but it's worth a try. I'd have a good ice cream (for my tastes, it would be coffee) & whip up some cream. If the cake doesn't work, you'll have tasty chocolate crumbles to put on ice cream with a dollop of whipped cream.

SpikeC
05-17-2013, 06:25 PM
Chili Verde

Several pounds of pork shoulder cut up
Flour (corn or whatever)
Handful of Anaheim chilis
A yellow onion
Pile of garlic
A pile of tomatillos
Yellow potatoes
Cumin
Oregano
Chix broth
Salt & pepper

Peel and rinse tomatillos, cut in half and place on baking sheet, char under broiler. Char peppers, place in paper bag for 10 minutes then peel and deseed.
Put tomatillos and peppers in chop-o-matic and mutilate.
Brown onion and garlic in vessel that the pork was browned in, deglazing with something if needed. Add fresh ground using and oregano, releasing their aromas, then add the mutilated veggies and the pork. Add enough broth to cover, some s&p, and simmer for an hour or so, then add diced potatoes. Cook for another hour or 2 and reduce to a nice consistence if needed, correct seasoning.
Serve with rice.
Hot chilies can be added as needed or tolerated.

cnochef
05-20-2013, 07:17 PM
The famous and ever-reliable Bolognese sauce recipe from Marcella Hazan:

http://www.dinneralovestory.com/tag/marcella-hazan-bolognese/

MichaelCampbell
05-21-2013, 05:21 AM
I am eating chicken pizza with my favourite coke after a long time and makes me happy.

mr drinky
06-29-2013, 02:38 AM
Thomas Keller's Fried Chicken from Ad Hoc, hands down an unbelievable dish every time! I'll take a photo of the recipe tomorrow.

Ok, slight bump on this thread. I am going to start happily working through these recipes. I cooked my Molly Stevens' dish tonight and it was an easy hit again, but there are so many tasty ideas here. I have to break out.

I think I am going to start with Stereo's fried chicken as I have that book on hand. But someone dropped off a bunch of rhubarb, so tomorrow strawberry rhubarb pie comes first. I've never baked a pie before -- this should be interesting.

Anyhow, I am going to partially promise to make any dish posted in this thread. The only caveat is that at any time I can choose to NOT make any dish in this thread and break my promise ;) It is sort of a challenge without obligation -- just shame if I don't do it. But I am from the upper midwest and shame is a powerful motivator thanks to a boatload of Scandinavian Lutherans.

And then again I will likely be moving in 3-5 months, so I might have that on my plate too. At that point in time, all bets are off.

k.

jimbob
06-29-2013, 07:44 AM
Thanks for the bump on the poor mans equally non-existent KKF cookbook. Sounds like i may, or may not, hear of your endeavours.

Jim
06-29-2013, 12:45 PM
Here is another one that works on a real BBQ or just a grill.

Always a crowd favorite!




http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22227


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22228


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22229


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22230


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22231


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22232


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22233


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22234


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22235


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22236


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22237




Enjoy!


Thanks TJ!

mr drinky
06-29-2013, 02:10 PM
Those look awesome.

k.

slowtyper
06-30-2013, 03:52 AM
Chilli. Probably not terribly authentic but I've tried a few different ways and stuck with one and of all the things I ever cook, it's by far my favourite and with others who have tried it too.

Are you going to share?

Mrmnms
06-30-2013, 07:20 AM
+1. Do I see roasted pepper and corn in the mix?
Those look awesome.

k.

sachem allison
06-30-2013, 09:31 PM
Here is another one that works on a real BBQ or just a grill.

Always a crowd favorite!




http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22227


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22228


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22229


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22230


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22231


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22232


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22233


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22234


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22235


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22236


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22237




Enjoy!


Thanks TJ!




If you were to dip them in beer batter and deep fry them and serve with spicy guacamole? hmmmmm?

cnochef
06-30-2013, 10:50 PM
I think they're called Armadillo Eggs if I'm not mistaken.


Here is another one that works on a real BBQ or just a grill.

Always a crowd favorite!




http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22227


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22228


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22229


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22230


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22231


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22232


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22233


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22234


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22235


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22236


http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22237




Enjoy!


Thanks TJ!

stevenStefano
07-01-2013, 07:53 AM
Are you going to share?

Like I say, the recipe is not authentic in the slightest, but for any of the US recipes I've read, you just can't get the ingredients here in Europe. So maybe you wouldn't even call it chilli? Also I generally make it for a few people, some of whom don't like anything super spicy. I just get quite a lot of beef mince, fry it with some onions and about 6 cloves of garlic then throw in about half a jar of roasted red peppers I've cut up. Add cumin and hot paprika, Worcestershire sauce, chipotle paste, tomato puree and about 2 tins of chopped tomatoes. Then add a 660ml bottle of beer (I use San Miguel) and simmer it for about an hour an a half. Then just before I serve it I add a little brown sugar and cinnamon, and that's it

mr drinky
07-06-2013, 12:08 AM
Thomas Keller's Fried Chicken from Ad Hoc, hands down an unbelievable dish every time! I'll take a photo of the recipe tomorrow.

So I did TK's fried chicken tonight and it was amazing. I love the spice and it was the moistest fried chicken I have ever had. The only thing I would do is cut down the brining time from 12 to 8 hours. TK said that going beyond 12 hours will make the meat too salty, and at 12 it was a tad on the salty side for me. TK often admits to the fact he has become desensitized to salt and he travels with a little salt box so he can salt his dishes more at restaurants, so I sometimes try to cut back on salt in his dishes because I assume he errs on the side of salt.

With that said, it was awesome and I will definitely do it again. Thanks for sharing this.

Next up: probably Jim's pasta and Lucretia's chocolate cake for my daughter's birthday. And once I can find good fingerlings at the farmers' markets I will try kynfe's rec on Pommes Boulangere from Coliccio.

k.

mano
07-06-2013, 11:19 AM
hanger steak with agrodolce sauce. Got this from a TV show "The Best Thing I Ever Ate." It's from Fig restaurant in SC and the recipe wasn't specific. I emailed Fig with what I thought it was and they said it wasn't on the menu at the moment (nice way of saying "We're not giving you the recipe") but what I had was about right.

Last night the 12 year-old daughter of our friends asked us to "Make that steak thing again when we come to your house." She remembered it from a year ago.

Mire poix of carrots, onions and garlic
Tomato paste
Balsamic
Saba
Aromatics
Beef stock
Veal stock

Reduce and strain

Johnny.B.Good
07-06-2013, 01:53 PM
hanger steak with agrodolce sauce. Got this from a TV show "The Best Thing I Ever Ate." It's from Fig restaurant in SC and the recipe wasn't specific.

I went looking for details on this (still don't have enough of them for me to feel confident that I could do it right without some experimentation), and found the video:


http://vimeo.com/14611357

mano
07-06-2013, 02:16 PM
I've made this about 10 times, always to rave reviews. Approximates:

Mire poix:
1 onion
1 carrot
4-5 garlic cloves

1 cup beef stock (they recommend using steak trimmings, but unless you're making a lot of hanger steaks, there isn't much to trim off each one)
1/2 cup veal stock
1/2 cup balsamic
1/2 cup saba (it's a PITA to find and can be expensive. On a few occasions I substituted a pound of white grapes, crushed them, boiled them down to 1/2 cup)
2 tbs tomato paste

Aromatics: several sprigs of rosemary and thyme or whatever you like. Lately I've added juniper berries

gyutoguy
07-09-2013, 04:02 PM
My goto meal if i'm having a shite day is a Sous vide 2" thick rib eye steak. 132F for 8 hours, seasoned with S&P, butter, a shake of garlic powder, spring of greek oregano. Seared off on a charcoal grill or a stupid hot cast iron pan. Once maillard skin appears, rub with a piece of garlic. Rest steak on cooling rack.

Strain steak bag juice with double layer of cheese cloth or chinois, make a pan sauce with steak fond. I like red wine, steak bag juice, lemon or good white wine vinegar, butter and s&p.

Serve steak with some roasted veg, some kind of mash or wilted greens. I like the steak on some wilted fresh spinach or pea shoots/spinach salad with a tart lemon and dijon vinaigrette, chevre or shaved hard cheese, and some kind of toasted nuts.

A fresh horse raddish dip is killer with the steak as well. Grated fresh horse raddish (more or less depending on how spicy you like it), 1:1 mayo and 14% MF sour cream, squeeze of lime, S&P.

Needless to say, we don't go out to restaurants for steak.

gyutoguy
07-09-2013, 04:06 PM
I've made this about 10 times, always to rave reviews. Approximates:

Mire poix:
1 onion
1 carrot
4-5 garlic cloves

1 cup beef stock (they recommend using steak trimmings, but unless you're making a lot of hanger steaks, there isn't much to trim off each one)
1/2 cup veal stock
1/2 cup balsamic
1/2 cup saba (it's a PITA to find and can be expensive. On a few occasions I substituted a pound of white grapes, crushed them, boiled them down to 1/2 cup)
2 tbs tomato paste

Aromatics: several sprigs of rosemary and thyme or whatever you like. Lately I've added juniper berries

Oh you jerk. Now I have to try this. It sounds rediculous. I've saving the last of my veal stock in the freezer for something epic.

Could you just reduce 100% no sugar added grape juice? Or would you be missing out on the bitter from the seeds and skin?

mano
07-09-2013, 06:54 PM
Saba is sweet; the balsamic adds the sour. There's no specific recipe on line or on the video, so I just eyeball everything and adjust it along the way. Sometimes I find myself adding more saba and balsamic along the way.

Grape juice will probably do fine, probably even if you add sugar. IIRC, saba is grape must barrel aged for years on end. It's a thick syrup. Mosto cotto or vin cotto are other names for it, or something that is a close cousin.

Real saba is complex, fruity and it really does add to the flavor of the sauce.

This is a robust sauce so there's room to play with flavors, but use saba if you can.

Mucho Bocho
07-09-2013, 07:41 PM
This stuff?

$26

http://www.markethallfoods.com/products.php?product=Acetaia-Leonardi-Saba-Dressing

mr drinky
07-25-2013, 11:46 AM
Well, I made Jim's sausage and jalapeño armadillo eggs for my daughter's birthday celebration this last Sunday. I wanted something with spice for the adults, and it had the perfect heat to keep the kids' hands off of them. Sorry no pics as I was running behind all day with food prep.

I did mine on the grill and they came out amazing. All were consumed within 15 minutes. There is something about sausage and some heat that is really pleasing. With that said, about half of mine split, so they were not as pretty as Jim's. He cooked them low and slow in a smoker, and my grill was too hot in spots for the amount I made. Oh well, the flavors were still there. The only thing I changed up was I used half Jimmy Dean sausage and half bulk Italian sausage. I also forgot to add the onion to the filling.

Good call for a party.

k.

Jim
07-25-2013, 12:17 PM
Well, I made Jim's sausage and jalapeño armadillo eggs for my daughter's birthday celebration this last Sunday. I wanted something with spice for the adults, and it had the perfect heat to keep the kids' hands off of them. Sorry no pics as I was running behind all day with food prep.

I did mine on the grill and they came out amazing. All were consumed within 15 minutes. There is something about sausage and some heat that is really pleasing. With that said, about half of mine split, so they were not as pretty as Jim's. He cooked them low and slow in a smoker, and my grill was too hot in spots for the amount I made. Oh well, the flavors were still there. The only thing I changed up was I used half Jimmy Dean sausage and half bulk Italian sausage. I also forgot to add the onion to the filling.

Good call for a party.

k.

Glad to hear you enjoyed it.:hungry:

EdipisReks
07-25-2013, 05:56 PM
I've been doing variations on this (http://fxcuisine.com/Default.asp?language=2&Display=141&resolution=high&page=1) Beef Burgundy recipe for years, and it always impresses.

mr drinky
07-26-2013, 12:38 AM
I've been doing variations on this (http://fxcuisine.com/Default.asp?language=2&Display=141&resolution=high&page=1) Beef Burgundy recipe for years, and it always impresses.

My wife always mentions Beef Bourguignon -- she would go for this.

k.

NO ChoP!
07-26-2013, 01:12 AM
Sausage and bacon wrapped pork tenderloin.

Alternate pieces of bacon in a row between plastic wrap. Roll with a pin so they smush together. Remove top layer of wrap and smush some sausage to cover. Lay a tenderloin in the middle and tightly roll. Twist the ends of the plastic to really seal the bacon and sausage well. Remove plastic and bake at 350 for about a half hour'ish.....delish!!

Herbs, marinades and stuffing may be added as well.

and yes, smush is a very technical culinary term....