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View Full Version : Suggestions on glossy finish on knife handle, CA glue or?



pkjames
05-16-2013, 08:33 AM
Hi Guys,

After learning a lot form the last thread (http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/12146-first-DIY-wa-handle), I started my 2nd attempt this afternoon on a 210 aoki deba. Looking at the custom handles from the pro here, seems applying some sort of glossy finish is a pretty common practice (I could be wrong!).

From my woodturning experience, CA glue followed by high grit sanding and buffing is what we use the most to obtain a ultra-shiny finish, but that is mostly done with the help of a lathe turning the blank. Due to the small size, usually multiple coats of CA glue could be applied rather easily. As of knife handle, I don't know if it is easy to do so, and I am thinking it is actually quite tricky to get a nice coverage evenly, because thin CA glue dries quite fast (I don't use the thick CA, as I think it doesn't look good as a finish).

So I would like to hear from the experts here, do you use CA glue? If so, how do you apply the glue?

I have another idea, to use those epoxy based glossy, transparent "liquid glass". As they have significantly lower viscosity (even coating, would be too thick once sand back) than normal epoxy and will not turn milky overtime. Maybe worth a try?

All thoughts and suggestions are welcome!

Cant wait to try on this buddy! Black: australian Gidgee; light yellow: Mallee burl
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nYzj5SC6ebU/UZTRKeMYxnI/AAAAAAAABXw/uzzXT8QiE9Q/w1663-h1247-no/IMG_0540.JPG

kalaeb
05-16-2013, 09:10 AM
I may be in the minority, and am not a pro, but after finishing to a 2k grit, I use multiple thin coats of Tru-Oil gunstock finish.

Dave Martell
05-16-2013, 09:32 AM
I use CA glue to fill in voids only. To get the shine I use finer and finer belts and finally a quick buffing on a wheel.

pkjames
05-16-2013, 09:39 AM
As much as I like the look and feel of natural oil finish (which I use for almost all my woodworking stuff). Wouldn't some type of glue finish makes the handle more resilient to accidental dents and dirt from sharpening?

Of course I am talking about unstabilized wood.

knyfeknerd
05-16-2013, 10:08 AM
Tru-oil and sanding/ buffing. CA glue sounds like a bad idea, plus depending on how many coats of Tru-oil, you should probably achieve the effect you're talking about.

TB_London
05-16-2013, 12:36 PM
CA finish can be slippy in the kitchen, carnauba wax based friction polish on a mop gives a decent shine that is easy to redo as it fades from use. Tru oil can be tacky on oily woods but does build to a good finish on most other woods I've tried it on.

Good luck with the handle

danielomalley
05-16-2013, 12:58 PM
I also use CA glue only to fill voids in the wood. I also think it hardens the outer wood just a bit which can be nice. This said, I do the CA at about 220 grit and don't use it after that. After going through a range of grits, I get to 800 grit and then move on to 0, 00, 000, and 0000 steel wool for the final finish. Between each of the steel wool grits I use pure tung oil thinned with 30-40% mineral spirits for more penetration. I find that any gloss finish wears off on kitchen knives (or any knife that will actually be used) and tends to look cheap pretty quickly.

-daniel

pkjames
05-16-2013, 08:45 PM
thanks guys. Another idea: shellac... don't know if it can withstand the kitchen environment though.

ThEoRy
05-16-2013, 08:53 PM
thanks guys. Another idea: shellac... don't know if it can withstand the kitchen environment though.

Stefan uses a shellac mixture and technique. So there's that.

Burl Source
05-16-2013, 09:26 PM
Gidgee acts a little bit different than other woods.
If you power buff it the grain and any figure is prone to smearing.

The best finish I have seen on Gidgee was by Knife maker Russ Andrews.
He sands the wood beyond 1000 grit.
Then with a few drops of Tung or Danish oil rubs it into the wood.
Wipe off all excess oil between coats. Repeat until it looks good.
Then apply paste wax like you are polishing a pair of shoes.
Let sit about 30 minutes then hand buff with an old towel.
Then apply a couple more coats of wax.

Burl Source
05-16-2013, 09:42 PM
EDIT: I went back to my notes and double checked his instructions.

This is a quote from Russ;
"The finishing sequence that I use
is pretty straight forward....just hand sand through at least
1500X then apply a modest coat of tung oil...the undiluted
stuff..rub it in with your fingers....give it a little time to soak
in.....then wipe off the excess (before it gets tacky).

Let it dry....reapply as prefered...then buff with a strip of towell
with buffing compound rubbed in.......If theres a most important
part to this...it's hand finishing (no buffers). "

pkjames
05-16-2013, 11:37 PM
thanks for the tip mark! never knew that gidgee has the smearing syndrome :D
sad that I saw this after i put a few coats of shellac, but i will definitely put your (Russ) instruction into my little finishing notes :D

Cheers,
James


EDIT: I went back to my notes and double checked his instructions.

This is a quote from Russ;
"The finishing sequence that I use
is pretty straight forward....just hand sand through at least
1500X then apply a modest coat of tung oil...the undiluted
stuff..rub it in with your fingers....give it a little time to soak
in.....then wipe off the excess (before it gets tacky).

Let it dry....reapply as prefered...then buff with a strip of towell
with buffing compound rubbed in.......If theres a most important
part to this...it's hand finishing (no buffers). "

pkjames
05-17-2013, 03:35 AM
here is what it looks like after 5 coat of shellac, buffing and waxing.
Acceptable but still not as shiny as i expect, i think the buffing wasn't long enough. Oh well, there is always another knife to rehandle!

Will post a pic after installation.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-gac1Or-uV2g/UZXc1AOH3_I/AAAAAAAABYQ/ceez06EKZXU/w1663-h1247-no/IMG_0553.JPG

-James

pkjames
05-19-2013, 05:47 AM
so, here is the finished job!
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-55_IXAR2xWk/UZib_BGAdkI/AAAAAAAABZA/UiTZqtlhk5k/w942-h707-no/IMG_0564.JPG

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-l7D7Knr3FI0/UZib-Tu529I/AAAAAAAABY4/Lejo76YyYV0/w942-h707-no/IMG_0565.JPG

1st and 2nd attempt!
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-84dlWPWYxlg/UZib9nLlImI/AAAAAAAABYw/2B-ER7BsH8k/w942-h707-no/IMG_0567.JPG

jai
05-19-2013, 09:24 PM
*** happened to that deba the edge lookd wack as ****

keithsaltydog
05-24-2013, 03:38 PM
Nice handles James

WillC
05-24-2013, 06:10 PM
Gidgee acts a little bit different than other woods.
If you power buff it the grain and any figure is prone to smearing.

The best finish I have seen on Gidgee was by Knife maker Russ Andrews.
He sands the wood beyond 1000 grit.
Then with a few drops of Tung or Danish oil rubs it into the wood.
Wipe off all excess oil between coats. Repeat until it looks good.
Then apply paste wax like you are polishing a pair of shoes.
Let sit about 30 minutes then hand buff with an old towel.
Then apply a couple more coats of wax.

This repeated many many times is like french polishing isn't it?

Micromesh is another way to get a high- ish shine in something without buffing, not as shiny as polishing like this but a bit easier and quicker.

Looks great btw:)

pkjames
05-27-2013, 05:01 AM
thanks very much guys.

the blade of the debas do look a bit wack because they were purchased from yahoo jp in poor condition, the akoi has uneven and a bit twisted spine, can't complain for $60.... I just use them to learn my sharpening as well as being toying with handles.

this is a third attempt on an Aritsugu nakiri, still Mallee burl with gidgee :)

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-YuibZ4vb20s/UZ8W-Gtq7CI/AAAAAAAABbA/vRaRM_XtElU/w948-h632-no/_DSC2134.jpg

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-6MsAA6o1OaA/UZ8W9ElA3nI/AAAAAAAABaw/F1Us4NgOYic/w947-h630-no/_DSC2144.jpg