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crizq0
03-02-2011, 09:10 PM
I'm in the market for a dutch oven and I am hearing some good things between staub and le creuset. Which ones do you guys like. Also, I have a gas stove but my parents have a glass/ceramic stove, can they also be used on a glass/ceramic stove?

What do you use? What size do you like?

What are some of your favorite recipes to cook?

UnConundrum
03-02-2011, 10:25 PM
I have many, but no Staub. Just don't need another ;) I even have a Griswold that no Griswold collector has ever seen. I even posted pictures on a Griswold forum and all the old timers were stumped :)

My current favorite is Chicken and Dumplings (http://www.recipesonrails.com/recipes/show/659-chicken-and-dumplings)

http://www.recipesonrails.com/recipes/photo/659-chicken-and-dumplings.png?1261575749

obtuse
03-02-2011, 10:26 PM
I'd say get a Staub 5 quart round. That's the most useful size and staub makes an awesome product. Me favorite recipe? I cook everything from chili con carne to blanquette de veau. I would suggest you get All About Braising by Molly Stevens, it's a great book with great recipes and techniques.

joec
03-02-2011, 10:39 PM
I have both and they work about the same. I can't give a thumbs up to one over the other. The Staub is cheaper and I inherited the Le Creuset? Again just my opinion.

FryBoy
03-02-2011, 11:48 PM
I have a few of each. I prefer the Staub pots as they're heavier.

Here's one recipe for a simple but hearty stew, follow by photos.

BEEF STEW WITH MUSHROOMS & MARSALA

2 pounds lean stewing beef (round or chuck), cut in 1-inch cubes
cup all-purpose flour
teaspoon salt
teaspoon finely ground fresh black pepper
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
4 large carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
3 celery stalks, sliced into -inch pieces
pound small mushrooms, cut into halves or quarters
teaspoon dried thyme
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons brown sugar
cup Marsala Wine or Dry Sherry
1 14-ounce can beef broth
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
water
1 pound small red potatoes (or more if desired), cut into quarters
1 cup frozen peas, rinsed
2 tablespoons minced parsley

1. Rinse meat and pat dry.

2. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large Dutch Oven over medium-high heat.

3. Add flour, salt, and pepper to a plastic bag and shake to mix well; add half the meat to the bag and shake to coat well.

4. Shake off excess flour and add meat to pan; cook about 3 to 5 minutes until the meat
releases easily from the pan and is well browned on that side; turn the meat over and
continue cooking until well browned on all sides; reduce heat if pan begins to smoke;
remove meat from pan and set aside in a large bowl.

5. Add another 1 tablespoon of oil to pan; repeat steps 3 and 4 with the remaining half of
the meat; add the cooked meat to bowl.

6. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil to the pan, then add the onions, carrots, and celery; cook over medium-high heat, stirring frequently, until veggies are soft and onion starts to brown, about 5 to 10 minutes.

7. Add the mushrooms and the thyme to the pan, stir to combine, and cook about 5 more minutes, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms release their liquid.

8. Add the minced garlic and the brown sugar to the pan, stir and cook about 1 minute or
until you begin to smell the garlic.

9. Add 2 tablespoons of the flour remaining in the bag to the pan, and stir well to combine; cook about 2 minutes, stirring frequently.

10. Add Marsala or Sherry to pan and stir, scrapping the bottom of the pan to release any
brown bits.

11. Add beef broth and vinegar to pan; add enough water to cover meat; bring to boil; if
gravy is too thick, add additional water.

12. Reduce heat to low, cover pan, and simmer stew for about 2 hours, stirring
occasionally; remove lid if stew is too thin.

13. About 45 minutes before the stew is done cooking; add potatoes, stir to combine, and continue cooking until potatoes are done.

14. Add peas and continue cooking until heated, about 3 to 5 minutes more.

15. Taste stew for seasoning and add salt and/or pepper if needed.

16. Add parsley to stew, stir to combine, and serve.


http://rdcollins.smugmug.com/Other/Food/Stew-1/776248149_5oJnE-XL.jpg


http://rdcollins.smugmug.com/Other/Food/Stew-2/776248173_vWZo7-XL.jpg

apicius9
03-02-2011, 11:53 PM
Oh man, I should not have opened that one. Gotta leave the office and find food now, and I am sure whatever I find will not be as good as this stew.

I only have one 5qt round Staub that I use for braising. Their 9qt oval dutch oven has been on my list for a while now, but I haven't gotten myself to spending that much on another pot again. It's not that there is a scarcity of cooking vessels in my one-person household...

Stefan

Avishar
03-03-2011, 12:25 AM
Staub and Lodge all the way for me! The only advantage I see in LC is the ability to see how dark your fond is and how well its browning (and perhaps their terrine, which seems to be the standard). Staub weighs more, has a nice flat bottom, heavy lipped lids, cool little basting dimples that probably don't do anything but are fun to wield like a shield at your friends, sturdy metal knobs, cooler colors (I'm a fan of the grenadine and the plain black) and tends to build up a little seasoning just like traditional cast iron pans. I own two 9 qt Creuset, one 8 quart Staub, 7 quart Lodge pro logic, 6 quart Staub coq au vin, 5 qt Staub and Creuset, and 3.5qt Staub Honeycomb Braiser (my favorite).

cnochef
03-03-2011, 12:42 AM
I think the Mario Batali line represents excellent value and they have a dutch oven, that being said I'm currently lusting for a Le Creuset brazier.

I use my Le Creuset dutch oven for many things: Soups, Bolognese sauce, chili, chicken curry, coq au vin, oatmeal and even fried chicken and fish & chips.

Jim
03-03-2011, 01:23 AM
I use my Le Cruset jumbo all the time- every Sunday for sauce at the least.

http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22604
Here is a braised chuck roast.
http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=23096

so_sleepy
03-03-2011, 03:33 AM
I have been using my stub 5.5qt for baking bread a lot recently. I think Le Creucet still have a polymer knob on the lid that has to be removed if you are baking at high heat.

Pensacola Tiger
03-03-2011, 08:56 AM
I have been using my stub 5.5qt for baking bread a lot recently. I think Le Creucet still have a polymer knob on the lid that has to be removed if you are baking at high heat.

Replace the knob with a stainless one:

http://www.amazon.com/Creuset-L9403-45-Stainless-Steel-2-Inch-Replacement/dp/B0014JRN0Q/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1299157017&sr=8-1

Pensacola Tiger
03-03-2011, 08:58 AM
What do you use? What size do you like?



I have a Lodge Logic that is one-quarter the price of either a Staub or Le Creuset. As far as I can tell, it works the same.

http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-EC6D43-Enameled-Cast-Iron-6-Quart/dp/B000N501BK/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1299157106&sr=1-1

Dave Martell
03-03-2011, 10:53 AM
The food pics in this thread are amazing.

heldentenor
03-03-2011, 11:22 AM
I love my three Le Creusets in 2 3/4 qt, 4.5 qt, and 7 qt. Use them for absolutely anything, from making small batches of stocks to French onion soup, braised short ribs, chili, and all-day bolognese. As another poster referenced, I like being about to see the fond development and make sure that I'm not at the burning stage yet, and the white enamel helps in that regard.

I also use a glass topped stove, and as long as you don't drop your Dutch oven on the top and crack the elements, it works just fine!

Jay
03-03-2011, 11:49 AM
I've heard a lot of good things about Staub, but I can't imagine being happier with anything than Le Creuset. I have an au gratin pan than I bought in 1975 that still looks new, and I'd be lost without one of their dutch ovens.

WildBoar
03-03-2011, 12:18 PM
We've got a stack of Le Creuset, and use them for soups, braises and sauce. Braised lamb shanks cooked similary to osso buco are awesome. We braised a venison roast the same way a couple weeks ago that rocked (used a mushroom stock instead of chicken or beef, and added a lot of wine).

deanb
03-03-2011, 12:23 PM
I have a Staub 12" skillet and a 12" square grill pan coming tomorrow. Their web site says you can season them with veggie oil but they also recommend washing them with detergent. Anybody have any experience with this?

spinblue
03-03-2011, 01:41 PM
We got a LC, the points added up on one of our credit cards. When we looked at the options, they had a $100 card for Bed, Bath and Beyond. We got two cards and paid like $8 for the (I think) 5.5 Qt round.

I use it all the time, last night was braised pork blade roast (Asian flavors), with Jasmin rice. The ju that was created was packed with flavor. This was our first nice dutch oven and I remember wanting to make something special for its first bake, braised lamb shanks. From braises, soups and boiling, it looks cooked in with the patina.

FryBoy
03-03-2011, 01:46 PM
I have a Staub 12" skillet and a 12" square grill pan coming tomorrow. Their web site says you can season them with veggie oil but they also recommend washing them with detergent. Anybody have any experience with this?
The Staub pots and pans are not like your regular cast-iron pans. You do NOT want to build up a crusty interior as you would in a Lodge frying pan -- wash them well after every use.

See this page from the Staub website: READ ME (http://www.staubusa.com/care/index.asp)

mhlee
03-03-2011, 02:10 PM
I do not season with oil. I've had some of my le creuset pans for at least 10 years. Some of the interiors have gotten scratched (cooking dry beans does a number on the interior for some reason - I'm thinking the fine grit abrades the interior) but I wash my Le Creuset pots and pans with dishwashing soap until clean after use. For stubborn interior stains, I use liquid barkeeper's friend. For stubborn exterior stains, I use powder barkeeper's friend.
I too have chosen le creuset over staub because the interior of le creuset pans are lighter and you can see the color of the fond when sauteeing or searing. But, I've read that staub is excellent. I'm hoping to buy one soon.

dreamsignals
03-03-2011, 02:24 PM
cooking dry beans does a number on the interior for some reason

that's what caused my first enammeled cast iron to be returned. not only everything started sticking but the whole interior surface had hairlines cracks. always thought it was a fluke

bprescot
03-03-2011, 03:06 PM
We lived next to a Le Creuset Seconds Outlet for a while, and amassed quite a collection of "damaged" products. Like our 9.5 quart, that has an uneven enamel on the underside of one handle. For being "defective", that things cooks pretty friggin' good!

We do cassoulet, stews, posole, bolognese, pulled pork (sorry, no smoker), bread, soups, ribs, casserole ... Now that I'm thinking about it, I think without my dutch ovens my cooking repertoire would be reduced by an easy third! Can't comment on the relative price of the two, but the Staubs I've seen have been pretty pricey. Then again, so is retail on the LCs... You might want to check out that outlet option, you know?

Dave Martell
03-03-2011, 05:20 PM
Back in the late '80's & early '90's there was both an outlet/2nds store for LeCruset & AllClad over in Flemington, NJ that we used to peruse a few times a year. This was back when outlets were really outlets for 2nds and we picked up a lot of great steals (I mean deals) over the years. Most all have just slight cosmetic flaws but work perfectly and the flaws have to be pointed out to see them. I couldn't touch these same pots and pans today even in the new updated outlet stores over in the same town, just too pricey for me. I'm glad I scored what I did when I did, one of the few smart moves I ever made. :)

bprescot
03-03-2011, 05:26 PM
Hey Dave,

Actually we got that second from the one in Flemington. It was listed on clearance at 175, and the guy was doing additional scratch off cards. I got one that was 10% but my wife got one that was 45%! Needless to say, we used that one. One of the better deals we've ever gotten. But then again, we went during the Winter doldrums (Feb or March) and the entire outlet area was deathly quiet. The guy was nice, but real disappointed we didn't buy more. Got the feeling the store was hurting bad.

99Limited
03-03-2011, 05:49 PM
I've got a 3.5, 4.5, 5.5 and a 7.25 qt round LC and a 5.75 coq au vin cocotte Staub. Some people complain about LC staining on the interior. I just look at it as a patina. You won't find any cooking performance difference between Staub or LC. I've got flat top electric stove that works just fine, just expect these things to take a little longer to come up to temp. I guess you could speed things up and turn the dial up to high, but I never go over med, med-hi. With cast iron I'd rather creep up on my optimum cooking temperature. I'm never in that big of a hurry.

I think it comes down to what colors you like best and the price. Staub's colors are more richer looking and LC's colors are more, I don't know, plain looking although they have some pretty off-beat colors.

Dave Martell
03-03-2011, 06:19 PM
Hey Dave,

Actually we got that second from the one in Flemington. It was listed on clearance at 175, and the guy was doing additional scratch off cards. I got one that was 10% but my wife got one that was 45%! Needless to say, we used that one. One of the better deals we've ever gotten. But then again, we went during the Winter doldrums (Feb or March) and the entire outlet area was deathly quiet. The guy was nice, but real disappointed we didn't buy more. Got the feeling the store was hurting bad.

Sounds like you scored a great deal that day Ben. :)

Is this the store on main street? I haven't been to this one yet. We used to go to it when it was over by the RR tracks (stand alone building), it was a mess of a store actually, but full of treasures.

RobinW
03-14-2011, 10:31 PM
I got a LC 7qt oval from the local LC outlet. When I got home I found that the bottom was not curved concave but convex. When using it on gas top I imagine that does not matter, but if using a glass top it would not be very efficient. Returned it the next day.

So, if going for the outlet version, then make sure it does not have any unwanted defects...

crizq0
10-15-2011, 01:54 AM
Ended up getting a 5.5qt Staub. Made a Pot Roast (stracotto???) with porcini mushrooms.

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b332/crizq0/DSC_0200.jpg

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b332/crizq0/DSC_0195.jpg

If you guys have any more recipes to make stews, soups, or roasts. Please post them or send them my way.

I'm looking for a boeuf bourguignon recipe. Probably the julia child's one unless somebody has a better version of it.

obtuse
10-15-2011, 02:06 AM
Nice! I'm glad you got the staub. Julia's recipe is good, I have bourdain's which is a bit simpler. If you want I will post a few tomorrow ... gotta sleep

DwarvenChef
10-15-2011, 02:20 AM
I'd say get a Staub 5 quart round. That's the most useful size and staub makes an awesome product. Me favorite recipe? I cook everything from chili con carne to blanquette de veau. I would suggest you get All About Braising by Molly Stevens, it's a great book with great recipes and techniques.

Love that book :) I have 7 dutch ovens, most cast iron, and one enameled 6qt I think. It is just on the large size for 3 people but works very well for acidic reductions. I use the cast iron Lodges for everything else.

apicius9
10-15-2011, 02:51 AM
..... and one enameled 6qt I think. It is just on the large size for 3 people.....

Not sure what you are talking about, I am by myself and dream of the 9 quart oval... All the things you can do with left over braised meat, and many of them taste better a day or two later. Oh, and another +1 for the braising book, one of the best cookbooks out there IMHO.

Stefan

crizq0
10-15-2011, 03:07 AM
I have the All About Braising book on order.

ptolemy
10-15-2011, 04:26 AM
Wring thread to open at 3:39am......grrrrrrrrr

DwarvenChef
10-15-2011, 07:13 AM
I have a hard time leaving left overs alone :p I would LOVE a 9qt, but allas my wife says the shelf is full, there must be room on it before you buy anything to put on it... Trust me I'm working on ways to condence what is already there...

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a190/DwarvenChef/FSCN0125.jpg
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a190/DwarvenChef/DO0209106.jpg
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a190/DwarvenChef/DSC00762.jpg

A few pics... older but hey :p

ajhuff
10-15-2011, 10:00 AM
Staub for me! I use it on a glass top no problems. I think Staub and LC are pretty much 6 and 1/2 dozen the other the same, though I give the edge to Staub. I don't like the cheaper imitations made in China because I have my doubts about the lead levels their enamel. Nothing to back that up other than my spidey senses as a metallurgist.

Any soup goes into my Staub.

-AJ

TDj
10-17-2011, 01:59 PM
i have 2 staubs and 1 LC. I like the staub more than the LC - the LC feels like a lightweight - my mind must be pretending that i get a better sear with the staubs. But i must admit that the first staub I owned had a lid that didn't fit right so i had to return it. But the two since then have been pristine. Oh - and staub's colors are prettier.

Kyle
10-17-2011, 03:40 PM
This thread is really making me want to go out and buy a 7.5 qt Staub or Le Creuset dutch oven. The only other large pot I have is a bare Lodge dutch oven but I don't like using it for chili because of the metallic aftertaste it imparts. I see pictures of guys at chili cookoffs that use bare cast iron for their chili, does prolonged use/seasoning ever make the aftertaste go away or how do they deal with the problem of tomatos and other acidic foods in bare cast iron?

swarfrat
10-17-2011, 03:43 PM
... and one enameled 6qt I think. It is just on the large size for 3 people ....


Not sure what you are talking about, I am by myself and dream of the 9 quart oval... All the things you can do with left over braised meat, and many of them taste better a day or two later. ...

My wife whipped up a chicken stew for the two of us last night in our 5-qt. Fontignac (Staub's cheaper brother) and I'll be eating leftovers for the rest of the week (which is a good thing).

Speaking of cheaper brothers, I noticed Costco has a house brand 6.5-qt (http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?prodid=11631290&whse=BC&topnav=&cm_sp=RichRelevance-_-categorypageHorizontalTop-_-PopularProductsInCategory&cm_vb=categorypageHorizontalTop|PopularProductsInC ategory) that's made in France and looks pretty nice.

mr drinky
10-17-2011, 03:53 PM
I have 7 dutch ovens....

That's amazing. I guess if I started collecting dutch ovens, my wife wouldn't notice the knives as much ;)

I'm ordering that book today. Thanks for the pics and info everyone.

k.

mateo
10-17-2011, 06:26 PM
I have three... "dutch ovens" a 2qt round, and a 3.5qt and 6.75qt oval. All Le Creuset. I don't really favor Staub over Le Creuset, or Le Creuset over Staub... I just happened to receive a Le Creuset as a gift and started the collection. I want the Goose Pot... not sure if the wife will ever allow that one.

http://www.amazon.com/Creuset-Enameled-Cast-Iron-2-Quart-French/dp/B000162M7M/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1318887558&sr=8-2

DwarvenChef
10-18-2011, 12:23 AM
This thread is really making me want to go out and buy a 7.5 qt Staub or Le Creuset dutch oven. The only other large pot I have is a bare Lodge dutch oven but I don't like using it for chili because of the metallic aftertaste it imparts. I see pictures of guys at chili cookoffs that use bare cast iron for their chili, does prolonged use/seasoning ever make the aftertaste go away or how do they deal with the problem of tomatos and other acidic foods in bare cast iron?

Properly seasoned CI will not leave off flavors to the average taster. However 10% +/- of the people out there have a more hightened taste reception or sensitivity to metalic flavors. When I was doing braises and cooking with CI pots and pans at my last place I never had a comment about off flavors. Not that the customers would be reliable base for comments really but the staff that gobbled up the left overs never said boo.. My first reaction to all comments about a metalic taste is to inspect the seasoning on the cookware...

DwarvenChef
10-18-2011, 12:30 AM
I have three... "dutch ovens" a 2qt round, and a 3.5qt and 6.75qt oval. All Le Creuset. I don't really favor Staub over Le Creuset, or Le Creuset over Staub... I just happened to receive a Le Creuset as a gift and started the collection. I want the Goose Pot... not sure if the wife will ever allow that one.

http://www.amazon.com/Creuset-Enameled-Cast-Iron-2-Quart-French/dp/B000162M7M/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1318887558&sr=8-2

Kind of like me and Lodge, I got used to them and don't like how others stack up against them. I do keep an eye out for the older items in good price ranges. I'm looking at a #16 Camp DO and my wife glares at me every time I stop near it #16 DO (http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-Logic-Pre-Seasoned-12-Quart-Dutch/dp/B00063RX2O/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1318909330&sr=8-7) Great size for pizza and such outdoors :)

cnochef
10-18-2011, 11:06 AM
A few years back I was lucky enough to get a package deal from Costco, a 9qt Dutch oven and a 2qt with a kitchen tool set for $175!!! Don't know if you'll ever see those prices again, though.

I love my Creusets but also really dig the cool rooster handle on the Staubs, and the little spikes they put on the inside of the lid to promote condensation and water drops falling into your braise.

zitangy
10-18-2011, 11:59 AM
Oh man, I should not have opened that one. Gotta leave the office and find food now, and I am sure whatever I find will not be as good as this stew.

I only have one 5qt round Staub that I use for braising. Their 9qt oval dutch oven has been on my list for a while now, but I haven't gotten myself to spending that much on another pot again. It's not that there is a scarcity of cooking vessels in my one-person household...

Stefan

"It's not that there is a scarcity of cooking vessels in my one-person household..."

where then is your harem of bronze silicon(ed) women??

rgds

Kyle
10-18-2011, 03:18 PM
Properly seasoned CI will not leave off flavors to the average taster. However 10% +/- of the people out there have a more hightened taste reception or sensitivity to metalic flavors. When I was doing braises and cooking with CI pots and pans at my last place I never had a comment about off flavors. Not that the customers would be reliable base for comments really but the staff that gobbled up the left overs never said boo.. My first reaction to all comments about a metalic taste is to inspect the seasoning on the cookware...

I made a pot of red beans and rice last night, no acidic ingredients and therefore not metallic taste. However, last week I made a pot of chili that had a few fresh diced tomatoes plus some tomato puree that simmered in the pot for a couple hours and it had that metallic aftertaste. It tasted find, but the aftertaste was driving me crazy. I'll try re-seasoning.

DwarvenChef
10-18-2011, 04:49 PM
I made a pot of red beans and rice last night, no acidic ingredients and therefore not metallic taste. However, last week I made a pot of chili that had a few fresh diced tomatoes plus some tomato puree that simmered in the pot for a couple hours and it had that metallic aftertaste. It tasted find, but the aftertaste was driving me crazy. I'll try re-seasoning.

After an "Acid test" of chili or the like I reseason my pots, the long term exposier to acids can eat away at the seasoning. Thats why I have 1 enamaled DO, just for acidic braises and such, like what I'm doing today :) Osso buko (sp) with tomato and white wine... that will go in the lined pot :p

jheis
10-19-2011, 06:29 PM
Costco has a house brand 6.5-qt (http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?prodid=11631290&whse=BC&topnav=&cm_sp=RichRelevance-_-categorypageHorizontalTop-_-PopularProductsInCategory&cm_vb=categorypageHorizontalTop|PopularProductsInC ategory) that's made in France and looks pretty nice.

I was wondering if anyone had any experience with the Costco product. For the "in store" $69.99 price, it looks like a hell of a deal.

James

Kyle
10-19-2011, 07:53 PM
Does anyone have any experience with the enameled Lodge stuff? My dad's birthday is this Friday and he's mentioned before he'd like an enameled dutch oven. I don't have $200+ to spend on something like Le Creuset and don't want to roll the dice on some Food Network endorsed made in China POS. Perhaps I'll take a look at this Costco pot, but I'm not sure if 6.5 will cut it.

ajhuff
10-19-2011, 10:30 PM
Does anyone have any experience with the enameled Lodge stuff? My dad's birthday is this Friday and he's mentioned before he'd like an enameled dutch oven. I don't have $200+ to spend on something like Le Creuset and don't want to roll the dice on some Food Network endorsed made in China POS. Perhaps I'll take a look at this Costco pot, but I'm not sure if 6.5 will cut it.

Lodge enameled ware is made in China, just so you know.

-AJ

obtuse
10-20-2011, 12:57 AM
I almost always cook chili in my lodge cast iron. I have yet to experience this metallic taste associated with acidic ingredients. Fortunately I'm not in that 10%.

Kyle
10-20-2011, 02:12 AM
Lodge enameled ware is made in China, just so you know.

-AJ

Dang. I had no idea.

The hekler
10-20-2011, 10:39 AM
I made a great pork chili verde yesterday in my LC 3.5 (I really do need to get a bigger pot but for one person it's more then enough). Put it on top of some cilantro rice on corn tortillas, better then anything I've had at any Mexican restaurants.

Kyle
10-20-2011, 06:38 PM
I'm going to go ahead and get him the 6.5 qt pot from Costco. I might end up grabbing one for me as well.

ajhuff
10-20-2011, 10:39 PM
I keep reading that Costco as Copco for some reason. Someday I hope to get my parent's Copco set. Made in Denmark. Quite heavy duty. White enamel interior, blue exterior. They are still around I think though I have no idea how the quality compares to my parents 45 year old, could be better could be worse.

-AJ

Kyle
10-23-2011, 04:12 PM
I'm going to go ahead and get him the 6.5 qt pot from Costco. I might end up grabbing one for me as well.

I picked up the dutch oven for my dad. Seems well made, but definitely thinner than my Lodge bare cast iron and it feels lighter than the cheap-o $30 enameled dutch oven I bought from World Market. Overall it seems like a good value.