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rdpx
06-11-2013, 08:49 PM
Is Camellia Oil the best oil for a Magnolia saya, Chopping Boards, Etc? [yes or No]. {I have a Bamboo chopping Board}

If no, what is the best oil (please name as many as you like.) ?

if Yes, how much should I expect to pay for some ( and how much should I expect to expect to use when I am oiling a saya or a board considering normal use in a home kitchen environment ] ? (please feel free to link to companies who will sell me this oil, or an Oil of your choice to my address in the UK).

Thank you.

Robert

Mrmnms
06-11-2013, 08:52 PM
You may want to try mineral oil. I mix a little bees wax into it for my boards and maple countertops

rdpx
06-11-2013, 09:00 PM
I am mainly looking for oil primarily for a saya, but thinking that I could also use whatever I get to use on a chopping board. Is mineral Oil also good for sayas?

stevenStefano
06-11-2013, 09:02 PM
Maxim sells camelia oil. I have mineral oil, got it off ebay but I use the John Lewis wax now, it's less messy and it smells nice

rdpx
06-11-2013, 09:04 PM
Maxim sells camelia oil. I have mineral oil, got it off ebay but I use the John Lewis wax now, it's less messy and it smells nice

I think I might have to try this John Lewis wax, you seem to like it. I am hopefully getting Sayas on Friday...

Is about 10 for 250 ml the going rate for Camellia oil?

ThEoRy
06-11-2013, 09:25 PM
Yes. I even vacuum knives with sayas in mineral oil.

Squilliam
06-11-2013, 10:11 PM
Mineral oil is nice. It's about as plain of an oil as you can get. It doesn't polymerize, go off, or have any smell.
I can't find any food grade mineral oil in my county, so I just use fragrance free baby oil, which I'm hoping is simply food grade mineral oil.
The problem with mineral oil on handles, is that it will leave them oily as it doesn't harden, so it can't really be used as a surface protectant. Mixing it with beeswax helps though. It's very nice after that for boards as well.
To make it more wear resistant, I add a little carnauba wax. It has a very high melting point so it helps a thin, hard wax film to stick around.

TB_London
06-12-2013, 02:34 AM
Mineral oil from a chemist is the easiest and cheapest. Once the wood has had a few good coats a wax will help seal the surface.

A glass bowl over a pan of water will let you make up a mix of mineral oil and beeswax

Squilliam
06-12-2013, 02:50 AM
I have been microwaving the oil until its somewhere above the melting point of beeswax (60-70 degrees C). Then I melt the wax into the oil with a small butane torch and give it a stir. Its much faster and cleaner than breaking up beeswax blocks.

pkjames
06-12-2013, 02:57 AM
I can't find any food grade mineral oil in my county, so I just use fragrance free baby oil, which I'm hoping is simply food grade mineral oil.

A lot of vet sell mineral oil in bulk. For some reason horses need them :D I assume they are "BP grade" :D

toddnmd
06-12-2013, 08:03 AM
I thought camelia oil was used more to protect carbon blades.

I like using a couple coats of mineral oil on boards, and then using a wax and oil mixture, which seems to give more durable protection. I'd think this would work for sayas as well.

barramonday
06-12-2013, 08:39 AM
@ squilliam Mineral oil is sold as paraffin oil in the supermarket here in OZ . If you ask for mineral oil no one knows what your talking about.

I use camelia oil on my knives and mineral/paraffin on boards,sayas and handles.

franzb69
06-12-2013, 09:10 AM
i buy my mineral oil at the pharmacy. it's medical grade so it'd be food grade as well.

Stumblinman
06-12-2013, 12:24 PM
My bottle of Mineral Oil says Laxative on it :)

eaglerock
06-12-2013, 05:14 PM
I buy my Mineral oil from IKEA :D

rdpx
06-12-2013, 07:42 PM
Thanks all - very informative!

Pensacola Tiger
06-12-2013, 08:13 PM
My bottle of Mineral Oil says Laxative on it :)

It is, so stop licking your fingers as you oil that handle!