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smilesenpai
06-12-2013, 02:35 PM
So I think I have a CCK1303 that was given to me. Why are these so popular?

There is shallow rust all over it. Will patina in vinegar protect it and clean it? If not how can this be done as I don't want to have to worry about rust when I put it down for a moment.

echerub
06-12-2013, 02:39 PM
They're popular because for not-too-much-money you get a really thin carbon steel chinese cleaver that cuts and slices really well. So-so steel with CCK, but great bang for the buck. Like all carbon steel blades, they will rust if not kept clean and dry.

bkdc
06-12-2013, 04:44 PM
It's carbon steel. You can't avoid the oxidation issue. Sharpen it and do a veggie session with it and you'll understand why they're so popular. If you care about your knives looking pretty, go buy yourself a Shun cleaver instead.

echerub
06-12-2013, 04:56 PM
Also, build a habit of having a towel handy to just wipe your blade before you put it down for a while on the board. That will serve you well for any carbon steel knives that you may buy in the future.

labor of love
06-12-2013, 05:13 PM
I love my CCK. Mainly because they feel like the steal for the price. The reactivity does suck though, I've thought about giving mine a vinegar bath but I wouldn't want to remove the kourochi finish. One day I'll get ashi or someone else to make me a stainless cleaver around the same size.

Noodle Soup
06-12-2013, 05:24 PM
By Chinese standards, their steel is high quality the workmanship is very good. CCK also makes plenty of stainless models if not rusting is a serious consideration.

Colorado_cutter
06-13-2013, 01:40 PM
I have found a mustard patina to be helpful with my CCK. Barkeeper's Friend and a green Scotchbrite pad should help you clean off the existing rust. Just make sure to rinse it well afterwards to get the BKF off.

smilesenpai
06-13-2013, 09:48 PM
I have found a mustard patina to be helpful with my CCK. Barkeeper's Friend and a green Scotchbrite pad should help you clean off the existing rust. Just make sure to rinse it well afterwards to get the BKF off.
Would you suggest this to the lacquer coating?

If only I could read the CCK site :P.

Thank all for you help.

keithsaltydog
06-13-2013, 10:49 PM
If it is new the lacquer coating should help keep rust down except lower part blade area.The CCK's have a rough grind wt. scratches,rust collects in this area near the cutting edge.Some good advice here get some barkeepers friend powder & a scrub pad will take the rust off.Keep it dry.After a while cutting foods a patina will form around the edge,which helps against rust.In the begining though don't let the rust stay on the blade.

A patina will not form on the lacquer coating some people strip it off wt. Acetone & put a patina on.

Colorado_cutter
06-13-2013, 11:02 PM
Would you suggest this to the lacquer coating?

If only I could read the CCK site :P.

Thank all for you help.
Yes, BKF won't take the lacquer off.
macmiddlebrooks has some nice pictures of what you can do with a patina here in the second post:
http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/7655-Show-your-newest-knife-buy/page5
but just doing the area around edge and leaving the lacquer on works well enough, too...

NO ChoP!
06-14-2013, 12:04 AM
I don't get it. I don't think CCK's are any more prone to rusting than any other carbon. In fact the lacquer coating is heavy and will withstand many hours of use and washing.

I would say that it is good practice to keep any quality kitchen knife wiped clean and dry.

smilesenpai
06-14-2013, 02:38 AM
Yes, BKF won't take the lacquer off.
macmiddlebrooks has some nice pictures of what you can do with a patina here in the second post:
http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/7655-Show-your-newest-knife-buy/page5
but just doing the area around edge and leaving the lacquer on works well enough, too...
Fantastic link! Thank you.

toddnmd
06-14-2013, 02:47 PM
I think the overall rust is more indicative of the storage conditions and lack of care the cleaver received, rather than any inherent issues it has.