PDA

View Full Version : Newbie needing help for a intro knife set. Thanks in advance!



daahn08
06-14-2013, 08:21 PM
Hey guys, I'm looking to start my first knife set. I have been a long time lurker but a first time poster. I am overwhelmed by how in depth this hobby is (I have way too many already). I am a cooking enthusiast, primarily Western cooking but am by no means a professional. Any kind of help, input would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

KNIFE TYPE
What type of knife are you interested in (e.g., chefís knife, slicer, boning knife, utility knife, bread knife, paring knife, cleaver)?
Chef's knife, utility knife, paring knife

Are you right or left handed?
Unfortunately, lefty

Are you interested in a Western handle (e.g., classic Wusthof handle) or Japanese handle?
It doesnít matter. Iíve used both and am pretty comfortable with both

What length of knife (blade) are you interested in (in inches or millimeters)?
Chefís knife- 210 or 240

Do you require a stainless knife? (Yes or no)
Would like stainless steel as I would like less maintenance. I probably wonít sharpen myself at first, as I know it takes skill and time.

What is your absolute maximum budget for your knife?
Looking for a total budget around 300-400


KNIFE USE
Do you primarily intend to use this knife at home or a professional environment?
Home, casual but frequent cooking

What are the main tasks you primarily intend to use the knife for (e.g., slicing vegetables, chopping vegetables, mincing vegetables, slicing meats, cutting down poultry, breaking poultry bones, filleting fish, trimming meats, etc.)? (Please identify as many tasks as you would like.)
Slicing/chopping vegetables; slicing meat.
No breaking down poultry or fish filleting

What knife, if any, are you replacing?
My roommate had a set of Cutco

Do you have a particular grip that you primarily use? (Please click on this LINK for the common types of grips.)
Pinch

What cutting motions do you primarily use?
Chopping, back

Better aesthetics (e.g., a certain type of finish; layered/Damascus or other pattern of steel; different handle color/pattern/shape/wood; better scratch resistance; better stain resistance)?
A pretty durable knife, donít really care about aesthetics too much but I guess I would prefer something that wonít require as much TLC

Comfort (e.g., lighter/heavier knife; better handle material; better handle shape; rounded spine/choil of the knife; improved balance)?
Heavier knife, finish/handle material doesnít really matter

Ease of Use (e.g., ability to use the knife right out of the box; smoother rock chopping, push cutting, or slicing motion; less wedging; better food release; less reactivity with food; easier to sharpen)?
As long as itís relatively sharp, I can use it. I am not a professional chef but a cooking enthusiast.


Edge Retention (i.e., length of time you want the edge to last without sharpening)?
Less maintenance, the better

KNIFE MAINTENANCE
Do you use a bamboo, wood, rubber, or synthetic cutting board? (Yes or no.)
End grain wood and have synthetic as well

Do you sharpen your own knives? (Yes or no.) No

If not, are you interested in learning how to sharpen your knives? (Yes or no.) Not at the moment

Are you interested in purchasing sharpening products for your knives? (Yes or no.)
Not at the moment

tk59
06-14-2013, 09:57 PM
Since you've used some knives, perhaps you can tell us what you liked and didn't like. Also, what do you use your "utility" knife for? We generally advise spending the lion's share on the chef's knife. I would recommend Suisin Inox Western or Gesshin Uraku or possibly a Glestain which will require a little work to learn to use well but pays big dividends in terms of neatness and in certain cases, speed.

ThEoRy
06-14-2013, 10:01 PM
Sounds like all you need is a gyuto and a petty.

easy13
06-21-2013, 11:29 AM
Any line of the Togiharu gyutos make nice entry level pieces on the cheap.