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rahimlee54
06-25-2013, 07:56 PM
I have modernist cuisine at home here and haven't really gotten into any of the chemical alternation stuff. I have done the easier ones the caramelized carrot soup and sous vide. I'd like to hear about other people's favorites or successes or failures if you guys wanna talk about them. I hope to get in gear and buy the modernist pantry kit and give the book a complete try.

Whats your favorite dish or technique from MC as well as something you do not care for. I really like the carrot soup, even without the fresh carrot juice.

Thanks

ecchef
06-25-2013, 08:06 PM
I'd like to play with a Pacojet, but haven't had the opportunity yet. I'm ok with changing the state of natural ingredients but I have no interest in chemical adulterants.

Jordanp
06-25-2013, 08:33 PM
How is the modernist cuisine at home? I was considering getting the main book but have been put off by the 508$ price tag considering I might not really get into it =/

pumbaa
06-25-2013, 09:02 PM
I have done powders, caviar, foams, fluid gels, and sous vide. They have their place but I am more of a classic method type of person.

cnochef
06-25-2013, 10:37 PM
How is the modernist cuisine at home? I was considering getting the main book but have been put off by the 508$ price tag considering I might not really get into it =/

Jordanp:

Welcome from a fellow Canadian (in Hamilton)!

I think that Modernist Cuisine at Home is a great introduction to the subject, even for a chef like me. It's a modest investment and at the least will get you looking at your cooking from a different perspective. If you really like it, then you can get the full set later.

cnochef
06-25-2013, 10:41 PM
Actually the microwave Eggplant Parmesan is excellent! You should try it for an easy, healthy, quick and nutritious dinner for two or appetizer for 4.

I also like to sous vide wild Atlantic or Copper River Salmon, because of how it maintains the gorgeous color of the fish.

I was somewhat disappointed with using sodium citrate to make the macaroni & cheese. I followed the instructions precisely and found the sauce far too thick and plastic-looking.

slowtyper
06-26-2013, 11:38 AM
I do like fluid gels.

Mucho Bocho
06-26-2013, 11:43 AM
totally agree with you on the sodium citrate. It did take on a more plastic texture but mine came out too thin not to thick. I love the book however, its currently on loan to Zwifel. it taught me a lot. I love the pressure cookeer recipes too.

Zwiefel
06-26-2013, 11:57 AM
I'm enjoying the book thoroughly...almost mad that I'm in the RV and can't start doing this stuff immediately! Almost ;)It's really stirring my imagination for some creative things I can do.

cnochef
06-26-2013, 12:18 PM
I can't wait to buy a pressure cooker and try the pork carnitas recipe, I bet it will be awesome.

Mucho Bocho
06-26-2013, 01:08 PM
Pressure cookers are fun and very versitile. I use mine weekly.

Lucretia
06-26-2013, 01:48 PM
Our local library has "Modernist Cuisine at Home". There's a queue for checking it out, but it's a free way to take a look. Worth checking a library near you if you're interested.

boomchakabowwow
06-27-2013, 02:46 PM
a pressure cooker is now modernist cooking?

hey, someone have the time to paraphrase the carnitas recipe? i never use my pressure cooker. i even considered turning it into a booze still. hehe.

i like carnitas more than booze.

Mucho Bocho
06-27-2013, 04:29 PM
Boom, Its not that PC is new, its just that when its applied with modern techniques, you can really transform foods in a new way. Just be sure that if your cooking in the actual pot, its stanless steel and not alumnium.

rahimlee54
06-27-2013, 08:34 PM
The pressure cooker is defiantly awesome, I make stocks and beans in mine almost weekly.

ChuckTheButcher
07-28-2013, 09:01 AM
I'd like to play with a Pacojet, but haven't had the opportunity yet. I'm ok with changing the state of natural ingredients but I have no interest in chemical adulterants.

I've been using paco's for years. They are decent tools but I find they are over rated. They always need to be fixed too.

danielomalley
07-29-2013, 12:21 AM
I've been using paco's for years. They are decent tools but I find they are over rated. They always need to be fixed too.

What's up with that?? It Pacojets seem like such a great idea, but it seems that everyone that I talk to that uses them has similar comments: the first half of the sentence is usually about them being very useful. The second half of the sentence notes that they don't work well in professional environments since they are always breaking down. :(

-daniel

wellminded1
07-29-2013, 12:40 AM
I agree the Paco is great, but I would invest in a higher end ice cream machine if i had my time and money back.

cnochef
07-30-2013, 03:13 PM
I love using malt vinegar powder on my classic fish & chips, it tastes great and your fish doesn't get soggy like when you douse it with real vinegar. Plus, it really surprises people when they first bite into their fish!

bieniek
07-31-2013, 03:14 AM
Boom, Its not that PC is new, its just that when its applied with modern techniques

Can you explain in a little more detail??

Mucho Bocho
07-31-2013, 08:27 AM
Mike, There is a lot going on these days roasting vegetables to be used in soups, sauces and condiments, as I'm sure you're aware being the shrewed kitchen chemist that you are.

While making garlic confit sing baking soda to increase pH. You can acheve maillard while preserving texture.