PDA

View Full Version : Fixing sharpening 'mistakes'.



tripleq
07-03-2013, 01:20 AM
Sharpening mistakes. We've all made them. A slip that causes an unsightly scratch on the side of a new knife or worse...one of your friend's knives. I've had my share of them. More often than not if things are really bad I end up refinishing the entire blade. I would be interested in hearing from some of the expert sharpeners here on what techniques they use to repair small scratches on blades or if anyone has any particular method of protecting the blade before a sharpening session. I'm sure Dave must have been a little intimidated when he started sharpening professionally and began receiving knives worth a huge chunk of change. Anyone have any tips to share?

EdipisReks
07-03-2013, 01:21 AM
go cut 20 pounds of leeks followed by 20 pounds of radishes, and then worry about knife scratches.

stereo.pete
07-03-2013, 01:44 AM
go cut 20 pounds of leeks followed by 20 pounds of radishes, and then worry about knife scratches.

This guy :doublethumbsup:

Squilliam
07-03-2013, 06:11 AM
Normally there's not much that can be done except for refinishing, or blending in a small patch when the original finish is coarse. Or if it's a carbon knife, rub it with a cloth dampened with vinegar :P

Dave Martell
07-03-2013, 08:50 AM
Sharpening mistakes. We've all made them. A slip that causes an unsightly scratch on the side of a new knife or worse...one of your friend's knives. I've had my share of them. More often than not if things are really bad I end up refinishing the entire blade. I would be interested in hearing from some of the expert sharpeners here on what techniques they use to repair small scratches on blades or if anyone has any particular method of protecting the blade before a sharpening session. I'm sure Dave must have been a little intimidated when he started sharpening professionally and began receiving knives worth a huge chunk of change. Anyone have any tips to share?



You're correct about me here, I was worried and had to come up with a way to deal with the problem. For a long time I used to tape the entire blade except for the edge and this does help but you have to be careful because the tape can leave marks and lead to rusting which is a whole other problem to deal with.

JBroida
07-03-2013, 09:02 AM
not that this is realistic for everyone, but i found the best way to learn how to fix knives was to make them... thats why every year when i come to Japan to train, i go through the whole process of making knives many times over... and i continue to practice (minus the forging part) in LA when i am back there... when you know how they are made, they are much easier to fix.

tripleq
07-03-2013, 10:42 AM
Thanks for the replies so far guys. Sorry about the misplaced thread Dave. Still getting the lay of the land over here. :slaphead:

tripleq
07-03-2013, 10:45 AM
go cut 20 pounds of leeks followed by 20 pounds of radishes, and then worry about knife scratches.

Yeah those are killer but I think the worst has to be rhubarb.

chinacats
07-03-2013, 11:02 AM
I don't like my blades to look 'beat-up' but they are tools so also don't mind them showing some battle scars.

:knife:

stereo.pete
07-03-2013, 11:07 AM
not that this is realistic for everyone, but i found the best way to learn how to fix knives was to make them... thats why every year when i come to Japan to train, i go through the whole process of making knives many times over... and i continue to practice (minus the forging part) in LA when i am back there... when you know how they are made, they are much easier to fix.

The above statement is very true as well. Granted I've only completed one knife, since then I have been much more adventurous with my other knives in terms of refinishing and sharpening in general. In fact, I just recently thinned, refinished and sharpened my Fujiwara FKH and now it's sharper than it ever has been. In fact, I have finally mastered hand sharpening a seamless bevel from choil to the tip, where before I would have issues around the curve of the tip.

stevenStefano
07-03-2013, 02:31 PM
Just keep practicing on cheaper knives until you don't scratch them any more then use the good ones. It's also good to practice thinning on the cheaper ones so that you perfect the badass big shiny bevel

bkdc
07-03-2013, 05:28 PM
I use blue painter's masking tape if I'm really worried about scratching something. But knives are meant to be put to use!

tripleq
07-03-2013, 06:38 PM
But knives are meant to be put to use!

They are indeed and I think the self evident proof that we are talking about working knives lies in the fact we are discussing sharpening blemishes. If I sent Dave a knife I wouldn't expect it to come back sporting a new sharpening scar. I hold myself to those same standards but accidents sometimes happen. Interesting to know how people go about dealing with them if at all.

Benuser
07-03-2013, 09:09 PM
Flatten your stones, use carbon knives and force a patina.

tripleq
07-03-2013, 09:13 PM
Flatten your stones, use carbon knives and force a patina.

Never crossed my mind. Thanks!

Zwiefel
07-03-2013, 09:22 PM
Dave said something to me today that struck a chord on this topic, and it echoed a similar comment from Jon a while back: One can view these scratches as signs of learning and growth...well-earned scars.

Miles
07-04-2013, 01:56 AM
Yes, they aren't mistakes but simply opportunities to improve one's skill. I remember being very precious about such things when I first started out, but now, not so much. Granted, I don't often create excess scratches any longer, but my blades are tools that I use. They pick up scuffs, scratches, and marks just from being used, cleaned, and carried around every day. I've come to appreciate a certain "seasoned" appearance that comes from being well used and cared for.

panda
07-04-2013, 02:33 AM
i always scratch my blades, dont give two shits as long as it gets sharp.

when i bought my first 'real' vehicle, sexy black dodge ram sport package and all with huge tires and tinted windows badges removed, i washed it twice a week and got it all shiny. after about 6 months i didnt care anymore and just made sure the guts were always in good order, not even think about the outside.

keithsaltydog
07-04-2013, 02:50 AM
i always scratch my blades, dont give two shits as long as it gets sharp.

when i bought my first 'real' vehicle, sexy black dodge ram sport package and all with huge tires and tinted windows badges removed, i washed it twice a week and got it all shiny. after about 6 months i didnt care anymore and just made sure the guts were always in good order, not even think about the outside.

:rofl2:I can dig it.My working knives I never cared a hoot,just so long as they are sharp.Doing others knives though I am more careful esp. Damascus blades try to have nothing above my thinning bevel line.