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CoqaVin
07-10-2013, 05:38 PM
I have been pondering what this could mean that was imprinted onto a saya...anyone know?

http://i1277.photobucket.com/albums/y483/MarkBelmar/20130710_173022_zps2daf8331.jpg (http://s1277.photobucket.com/user/MarkBelmar/media/20130710_173022_zps2daf8331.jpg.html)

Sara@JKI
07-10-2013, 07:44 PM
Maybe it was supposed to be "魂" (Tamashii/Spirit)?? It's missing just one stroke though. Or I could be a stupid one and not knowing this particular kanji - in that case, I apologize :(

xuz
07-10-2013, 07:45 PM

on: コン, (kon)
kun: たましい,たま (tamshii, tama)
meaning: Soul, spirit.

Not sure as to its relevance in the knife world.

mckemaus
07-11-2013, 04:45 AM
It is Tamashii. In calligraphy, it is acceptable to omit certain strokes or alter the strokes.

ecchef
07-11-2013, 06:13 AM
In calligraphy, it is acceptable to omit certain strokes or alter the strokes.

I would disagree with that. Kanji is pretty specific and to omit a stroke could make it nonsense or alter its meaning drastically.

But, best guess would be "soul".

pkjames
07-11-2013, 06:16 AM
it is soul to a chinese. missing a stroke

Seb
07-11-2013, 07:03 AM
I have it: it means 'I am missing a piece of my SOUL and I won't get it back unless I buy this/that/another knife!!!!'. ;)

ecchef
07-11-2013, 07:53 AM
I have it: it means 'I am missing a piece of my SOUL and I won't get it back unless I buy this/that/another knife!!!!'. ;)

:rofl2:

CoqaVin
07-11-2013, 08:27 AM
I have it: it means 'I am missing a piece of my SOUL and I won't get it back unless I buy this/that/another knife!!!!'. ;)

haha or it means I have a piece of your soul b/c you have bought this J-Knife now I am reeling you in to buy more HAHAHAHAHAH

Sara@JKI
07-12-2013, 05:33 PM
I would disagree with that. Kanji is pretty specific and to omit a stroke could make it nonsense or alter its meaning drastically.

But, best guess would be "soul".

yup I'm on the same page... Especially with this type of font (that is commonly used and not particularly crazily artistic), I tend to consider this typo.

mckemaus
07-14-2013, 11:08 AM
The changing or omission of stroke occurs in both Chinese and Japanese calligraphy. The writer knows it is a typo, but changed them for aesthetic reasons.

Here is example calligraphy of Tamashii in Chinese and Japanese:

http://www.chiho.jp/bw_uploads/33214cd9dd52_BC47/P1000834.jpg
http://www.missku.com/zitisheji/1663/30061.html
http://www.cidianwang.com/shufa/hun1172.htm

:)

JBroida
07-14-2013, 11:56 AM
as i happen to be here in japan, i've had a chance to ask more than a few native speakers (not to mention sara is a native speaker and has very in depth knowledge of the artistic world here)... the consensus is that is is not artistically done (and if so, is not well thought out or designed)... people agree its a typo

mhlee
07-14-2013, 12:36 PM
The changing or omission of stroke occurs in both Chinese and Japanese calligraphy. The writer knows it is a typo, but changed them for aesthetic reasons.

Here is example calligraphy of Tamashii in Chinese and Japanese:

http://www.chiho.jp/bw_uploads/33214cd9dd52_BC47/P1000834.jpg
http://www.missku.com/zitisheji/1663/30061.html
http://www.cidianwang.com/shufa/hun1172.htm

:)

Are you native Japanese, a native writer and speaker of Japanese, a serious student of the Japanese language or culture, or are you just someone who thinks they know more about Japan than someone who was born there, grew up there, whose first language is Japanese and can't stand being wrong?

rdpx
07-14-2013, 07:36 PM
The changing or omission of stroke occurs in both Chinese and Japanese calligraphy. The writer knows it is a typo, but changed them for aesthetic reasons.

Here is example calligraphy of Tamashii in Chinese and Japanese:

http://www.chiho.jp/bw_uploads/33214cd9dd52_BC47/P1000834.jpg
http://www.missku.com/zitisheji/1663/30061.html
http://www.cidianwang.com/shufa/hun1172.htm

:)


and... welcome to the forum!!!!

Seb
07-14-2013, 10:33 PM
Typo.

The bottom line is that the character on the saya is not an example of 'calligraphy' - it's copied from a standard publishing font of the kind that you would see on a sign or children's textbook so there is no way you can argue that the stroke was omitted for artistic or aestheric reasons. End of.

On closer inspection, you can see that the characters are drawn out of proportion to each other, and they are too 'squat', which would suggest that whoever created it cannot actually write in Chinese/Kanji. This suggestion is further reinforced by the omission of a stroke.

cclin
07-15-2013, 01:12 AM
The changing or omission of stroke occurs in both Chinese and Japanese calligraphy. The writer knows it is a typo, but changed them for aesthetic reasons.

Here is example calligraphy of Tamashii in Chinese and Japanese:

http://www.chiho.jp/bw_uploads/33214cd9dd52_BC47/P1000834.jpg
http://www.missku.com/zitisheji/1663/30061.html
http://www.cidianwang.com/shufa/hun1172.htm

:)
This character with omission of the top stroke is not typo; it is very old style traditional Chinese calligraphy character. however, it is only true in old style Chinese calligraphy but not for Japanese kanji!! (In modern traditional Chinese you needs top stroke to be correct "魂").
Kanji is adopted/basic-on traditional Chinese. not every Japanese understand/read/write all the Kanji..... Japanese are only required to learn 1,945 joyo kanji, but they learn others along the way.
from OP this is Japanese kanji on j-knife saya; therefore, I think "魂" is correct ...you need a stroke on top!