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View Full Version : Thinning advice for a lefty



TheDispossessed
07-18-2013, 08:23 AM
So i think it's time to thin the ginga a little bit.
i was thinking, given that the knife is asymmetrically ground, would it be advantageous for a lefty to thin the left side only as to reorient the geometry a little more to my needs as a lefty?
thanks for your thoughts!

franzb69
07-18-2013, 08:48 AM
i say go for it! =D

unless you have a cheap knife you can practice on and do that first.

bkdc
07-18-2013, 09:56 AM
I'm grateful to be a righty, but I try to grind symmetrically ground knives to bring about some asymmetry when it comes time to thin the knife. So yes, go right ahead if you are comfortable with it!

NO ChoP!
07-18-2013, 11:56 AM
This maybe the nerd way to do things, but as a lefty, I'm very nervous about screwing up the geometry...

I draw a large scaled choil view geometry sketch. I then draw in the lines of what I want to accomplish. This really helps me visualize things when it comes time to actually removing metal. Also, I'm more confident with what angles I'm using.

Pensacola Tiger
07-18-2013, 11:58 AM
So i think it's time to thin the ginga a little bit.
i was thinking, given that the knife is asymmetrically ground, would it be advantageous for a lefty to thin the left side only as to reorient the geometry a little more to my needs as a lefty?
thanks for your thoughts!

Unless you are having steering issues, I would suggest leaving the geometry alone.

Rick

stevenStefano
07-18-2013, 12:13 PM
It depends how asymmetric it is. If it's something like 70/30 righty or something, or if it's a very thin knife, you're better thinning the right side and reducing the convexity of it, there isn't enough steel on the left side for it to be worth doing. If it's a thicker knife or less asymmetric I'd thin the left and the right, but more on the left, so you're making the left a little more convex. That's probably not a "by the book" way of doing it, but it's worked out well for me

zWiLLX
07-18-2013, 09:44 PM
I agree with steven, sounds pretty dependent upon the angle.. you could go for 50/50 regular edge and transition it more on the next go.. Rick is probably technically right but the angle is guaranteed to change some moderate amount just via sharpening in the first place, why not push it a bit?? haha. It is my guess the blacksmith (if it's hand forged/laminated) didn't asymmetrically wrap the hagane..

TheDispossessed
07-20-2013, 11:49 AM
thanks for the input everyone.
i'm mostly just frustrated with poor food release so was looking to convex the left side of the blade hoping that would offer some improvement. it's such a thin knife all the way down that there isn't a whole lot to work with though..
as for flattening the right side, i guess that'd be a good idea as well, but again, not a lot of steel to start with.
i'm so grateful to Dave and members of this forum for enlightening me on the 'real deal' of asymmetry with gyutos and such. it's terribly frustrating to realize that as a lefty, all knives except customs have geometry working against you!
at this point, i feel like for my next gyuto i need to either buy something thicker and grind it down on stones to my specs (and rehandle it as i've noticed my blades are even set in the handle asymmetrically), or get a custom knife ground for a lefty.
pain in the ass, man

Benuser
07-20-2013, 01:53 PM
I believe Masahiro sells blades for left handed, not converted, but rather inverted if that makes sense, with a convex left face and a flat right one.

stevenStefano
07-20-2013, 04:11 PM
at this point, i feel like for my next gyuto i need to either buy something thicker and grind it down on stones to my specs (and rehandle it as i've noticed my blades are even set in the handle asymmetrically), or get a custom knife ground for a lefty.
pain in the ass, man

a Ginsanko Tanaka like panda is passing around at present sounds like a great one to go for. I believe Koki at JCK sells a lot of lefty knives, some of which aren't listed on his site. Perhaps send him an email?