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echerub
07-18-2013, 01:13 PM
Hey guys

I'm thinking of picking up a chopping cleaver to chop up whole, bone-in chicken, duck, whatever. However, I've always been a little hesitant to get a cleaver for this because I wonder if that's okay to do on a Boardsmith board with feet.

I could get a cheapie edge grain board just for chopping, but I'm not sure how well that's going to fly with my wife :) She's already nixed my suggestion to replace our one and only $20 non-stick wok which is no longer non-stick, so adding another board when I've got others that are perfectly good probably won't go over well.

(Notice that getting a whole new knife is not an issue - a cleaver just looks like another cleaver :) Probably gonna pick up a CCK chopper.)

So...

Is it alright to chop on an end-grain board on feet? Or would I eventually put too much stress on the joints between the wood that I'm going to cause problems with the board?

Mucho Bocho
07-18-2013, 01:18 PM
Len, Check this one out

http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/products/cleavers/chopping-block.html

Looks like a real deal chinese chopping block. Like the ones found in china Town

echerub
07-18-2013, 01:23 PM
I thought about getting an actual chopping block, but I'd really be in trouble if I did that. I already got a "more? really?" when I said yesterday that I need to get more mixing bowls :)

Mucho Bocho
07-18-2013, 01:35 PM
HAHA. The screw it then, just wail the piss out of the boards you have intil they're trashed. These chinese ones are very cool if you have the storage for them. I'd love to get a propper bone clever some day.

Dream Burls
07-18-2013, 02:23 PM
I'd be interested to hear what Dave has to say about this. I'd be very surprise if it were a problem. Maybe a baseball bat might be too much, but I'd think these boards could take a cleaver. Dave????

Notaskinnychef
07-18-2013, 02:37 PM
I'd also assume that there wouldn't be any issue. Granted I don't know for sure, but provided you had one with a decent thickness (say 2 inch and up) I'd feel fine smashing away :)

SpikeC
07-18-2013, 03:17 PM
The glue joints are stronger than the wood, if that is what you are worried about.

Marko Tsourkan
07-18-2013, 03:53 PM
I thought about getting an actual chopping block, but I'd really be in trouble if I did that. I already got a "more? really?" when I said yesterday that I need to get more mixing bowls :)

cleaver marks will be deeper on your Boardsmith than knife marks, so you will probably regret it as soon as you see them.

Feet are good for chopping, as you get some shock absorption. Real butcher blocks are up to 2' tall, and weigh a ton.

I would use a block on top of your Boardsmith for chopping.

M

toddnmd
07-18-2013, 05:07 PM
I'm with Marko on this one.

About a year ago, I was given a thick cleaver. The first night I used it was to whack some smoked chickens (maybe 5 or 6), and it definitely left some marks. If your technique is gentle (pressing down and moving the cleaver in a rocking motion to get through the meat instead of whacking), the cuts might not be as deep.

I'm glad I used an older board--no way would I do that on a Boardsmith, or anything I wanted to keep in good shape. I'd use an older board, or buy a cheaper one (like the ones Mucho Bocho suggested) for that purpose. Probably just bring it out when needed.

echerub
07-18-2013, 05:11 PM
Okay, sounds like I'm gonna have to get a cheapie board at least to place on top of my Boardsmith. I'd rather take the momentary pain of having to explain why there's a new board in the house than the longer-term pain of gouging out my good boards.

Hmm. If I have to explain the purchase anyways, maybe I should get a proper butcher block :)

schanop
07-18-2013, 05:15 PM
Sounds like a good plan. Also you can argue that food cooked in carbon steel or cast iron wok tastes better.

echerub
07-18-2013, 05:21 PM
Oh wait, my wife already has a cheapie board from before. Okay, I'll have to use that. It'll be alright.

About woks, I have 2 carbon steel and 2 cast iron woks already. Plus 1 cast aluminum. And the 1 non-stick coated POS wok that's no longer non-stick after just a month or two. My wife is quite amenable to using all the different woks (as long as I'm the one taking things in and out of the cupboard) - she just won't look too kindly on my getting another one :D

tripleq
07-18-2013, 05:24 PM
cleaver marks will be deeper on your Boardsmith than knife marks, so you will probably regret it as soon as you see them.

Feet are good for chopping, as you get some shock absorption. Real butcher blocks are up to 2' tall, and weigh a ton.

I would use a block on top of your Boardsmith for chopping.

M

+ 1.

schanop
07-18-2013, 05:37 PM
Ha ha, now I can under stand "more?" having sort of similar issue myself.

Mike9
07-18-2013, 06:25 PM
Non-stick Wok = yard sale item. I like that round block I might have to get one for "duck work"

Mucho Bocho
07-18-2013, 06:51 PM
Len, You could even put that round board on a wooden stool. You'll make an intimidating impression when People come by. Best to raise your bone chopper high over your head to get some leverage and momentum, and hit the chicken on the board like a 16 YO would at the State Fair trying for a state championship.

SpikeC
07-18-2013, 09:50 PM
I chop chicken for my dogs and use an old edge grain board for that. The boardsmith only sees the good knives.

Sambal
07-19-2013, 04:23 AM
Len, Check this one out

http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/products/cleavers/chopping-block.html

Looks like a real deal chinese chopping block. Like the ones found in china Town


One of my chopping blocks is a Chinese section-of-a-tree-trunk kind. To make storage easier I had a small arc sawed off so I could up-end it. Mine has a stainless steel loop attached to the side which makes handling easier. My main complaint about this board is that the surface became uneven and I gave up trying to sand it flat. I really like the large Chinese blocks that are used by the roast pork (siew yok), barbecued pork (char siew) and roast duck (siew ngap) sellers in Chinese restaurants here in Melbourne and all over Hong Kong and Canton. The well worn ones with a slight dip in the middle from years of chopping have a convincing authenticity and authority!

panda
07-19-2013, 01:06 PM
why does it matter if you get marks in the board? it's meant to be used? if it's that important why not put a thin cheapo plastic board on top?