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View Full Version : any one use chosera 2000 or 3000?



panda
07-23-2013, 06:49 AM
i'm always looking to simplify sharpening setup as much as possible. have condensed it down to a 3 stone lineup so far, chosera 400 a jns 1000 and jns synthetic aoto which acts like a 3k-5k finisher, but down to two stones would be even better!. i was wondering if i could skip the later two and just get a 2000 then strop from there, or even the 3k. is the chosera 2k refined enough edge to finish on? if not, is the 3k fast enough to remove scratches from the 400?

i would just get a gesshin 2k and call it a day but it's not a splash n go which is a requirement hence looking to stay within chosera line.

berko
07-23-2013, 07:05 AM
i have had the chosera for like 2 month now and dont like it too much. althoug i dont think i oversoaked it or treated it wrong in any way it cracked last week. besides i woudnt call it a splash and go stone, as it excels when beeing soaked for like 5 mins. the feeling isnt to bad, but i can have similar results with the shapton pro 2k, which is real splash n go and in my opinion fast enough to come from a 400 chosera. i strop after the 2k with 1-2 diamond spray on leather and couldnt me happier with those edges.

Benuser
07-23-2013, 08:39 AM
I use the Choseras 400, 800, 2k and 5k, but rarely in full progression. The jump from 400 to 2k is not impossible, but I prefer to deburr on the 800 in between. The 2k is a really hard stone, fast with a lot of feedback. After it there isn't much work left.

bkdc
07-23-2013, 11:47 AM
I have the 3K, and it is a hard and fast cutting stone with good feedback. As far as synthetic stones go, the sense of feedback is hard to beat although there are a few stones out there with a feedback that feels just as good. It's works well for all types of steels.

I agree with the others. You probably need at least three stones if you start with a 400. You'll waste more time trying to keep it to two stones.

Benuser
07-23-2013, 12:09 PM
I've tried today with simple carbons to jump from 400 to 2k. It took a lot of time to get the edge cleaned and the 400 debris removed. The 400 scratches aren't the problem, the burr is the problem. The end result seems weaker than I'm used to, using the 800 as well. Haven't tried with stainless, but I guess it would result in a spectacular wire edge.

wsfarrell
07-23-2013, 12:22 PM
I have the 3K, and it is a hard and fast cutting stone with good feedback. As far as synthetic stones go, the sense of feedback is hard to beat although there are a few stones out there with a feedback that feels just as good. It's works well for all types of steels.

What he said. 3k is a winner.

tk59
07-23-2013, 03:01 PM
I have the chosera 3k. It's a nice stone but to me, it doesn't really fit in a two stone set-up. IMO the ideal two stone set-up for western knives is something like 400/500 followed by 5k. Stropping is fine but unnecessary. I've been doing this for myself and others for a while now and feedback is generally good unless they are into ultra-refined edges which I don't see a point to anymore. If you get a wire edge you can't seem to remove, you are pressing too hard at the 400/500 grit. If you have a lot of material to remove, go ahead and press hard but as you are getting close to finishing, lighten up on the pressure. If the technique and the HT is good, you shouldn't have a problem deburring.

edredlee
07-23-2013, 03:15 PM
I also have the 3000 and find that it's coarse enough for a starting point and fine enough for just about everything at work except my yanagibas. (My short "beater" yanagi actually stops at chosera 3000) I love the stone.

However if you need to remove metal or set bevels etc, then certainly not coarse enough..

GlassEye
07-23-2013, 04:02 PM
I have a Chosera 3k, and really like it. I often finish double bevel knives on this stone.



I have the chosera 3k. It's a nice stone but to me, it doesn't really fit in a two stone set-up. IMO the ideal two stone set-up for western knives is something like 400/500 followed by 5k. Stropping is fine but unnecessary. I've been doing this for myself and others for a while now and feedback is generally good unless they are into ultra-refined edges which I don't see a point to anymore. If you get a wire edge you can't seem to remove, you are pressing too hard at the 400/500 grit. If you have a lot of material to remove, go ahead and press hard but as you are getting close to finishing, lighten up on the pressure. If the technique and the HT is good, you shouldn't have a problem deburring.

I tried 500 to 5k, the other day, for the first time, I have never had such a hard time removing a burr. This was on a CCK and Misono Swedish Carbon, obviously my technique needs adjustment.

panda
07-23-2013, 04:31 PM
I have no problem removing burrs, I do it right on the 400 its such a good stone. Sounds like 3k is a worth a try.
by the way where can I find 2 micron diamond spray? That's like what 8k grit? I have .5 micron stuff and all it does is make edge shiny, worthless.

berko
07-23-2013, 07:27 PM
my 1-2 spray is said to be around 12.000 #. i bought it from an austrian gemstone demand.

zWiLLX
07-23-2013, 11:38 PM
I used a 700 grit sigma power carbon for new edge rough-in, and jumped straight to a natural finisher awase-to and was frankly stunned by how well that worked. Logically it shouldn't, but I have another knife to set up and will take pics to demonstrate/prove (even to my still doubtful self) that it does.