PDA

View Full Version : usuba: which style?



perneto
07-24-2013, 05:13 AM
Hi all, I'm thinking of learning the usuba, and wondering which style to pick up. Kamagata usuba seems to be most popular around here, but I think it's common for beginners to break the tip. Based on that, would an Edogata usuba be a better choice? Do you find the tip of the kamagata very useful?

mast3quila
07-24-2013, 01:24 PM
I would regret not getting the kamagata. In fact I'm looking at the Gesshin Hide 210mm (JKI) vs the Shigefusa 210mm (JNS) right now.
I think the tip makes it a more versatile knife. Maybe you could pick up a cheap nakiri or Chinese cleaver to use when you are in volume mode and may not be as careful about how you are handling the knife.

bkdc
07-24-2013, 02:37 PM
Get the kamagata. I wish my kamagata were a kiritsuke-usuba with a flat cutting edge of an usuba and the point of a kiritsuke. You'll only break the tip if you drop it.

schanop
07-24-2013, 05:14 PM
This can be your unicorn, bkdc. 210mm kitaeji, with just a slight curve up at the very tip.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-DWRV3Cx8nd0/TubcU90SH2I/AAAAAAAAAPc/VIm62FsJs-Y/s1024/PICT0103.jpg

perneto
07-24-2013, 08:25 PM
Interesting, what do you think would be better about the kiritsuke/mukimono shape?

Asteger
07-24-2013, 08:34 PM
If I'm not mistaken these are only called mukimono. No connection with a real kiritsuke, except for a kind of shape-nickname which seems to offend the purists! ;)

I've thought about one of these - meant to be for normal usuba work, but also specialised for garnish cutting I think.

I agree that the possibility of breaking a tip is a consideration. At least one like this would have more thickness behind it, though it would also be pointer.

Seth
07-24-2013, 11:33 PM
I have both and I can't say which I like better, they are both cool knives. Unless you are a serious purist you can rock on low stuff, like mincing herbs, with the other one without worrying about the tip. You would not want to do this with a kamagata. I don't see a difference when doing horizontal cuts on shallots. I think it is probably more important to get one that has the correct grind and geometry and is thin with a good distal taper, and you may have to spend some money to get this. BTW, the edge of a usuba is not flat and shouldn't be. The ones I have are flat along the proximal section of the edge - about half way, then has a gentle up sweep on the distal half. You would not want a totally flat edge. With the flat portion on the board, the tip is - I'm estimating - maybe 3-4 mm off the board.

pete84
07-24-2013, 11:47 PM
This can be your unicorn, bkdc. 210mm kitaeji, with just a slight curve up at the very tip.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-DWRV3Cx8nd0/TubcU90SH2I/AAAAAAAAAPc/VIm62FsJs-Y/s1024/PICT0103.jpg

My pants got tight

knyfeknerd
07-25-2013, 11:33 AM
My pants got tight
+1:bigeek:
Jon Broida has spoken about sharpening a curve into the tip of his Kama-Usuba to help alleviate chipping. There are some pics somewhere around here.
J.Bro is really the master, and I yield any and all questions to him.