PDA

View Full Version : Looking for knives (Nakiri, Santoku, Gyuto) for home cook with good edge retention



Kumar
08-02-2013, 10:06 PM
I am moving back to India from the US in a few months. The knives back home...suck.

I won't be able to take any sharpening tools back with me, but want to take some good knives home and continue keep my cooking up.

I am sure, I can find something for their sharpening but having a knife that gives good edge retention would be a good priority.

I am looking for a Santoku and Nakiri (for myself) and a 210 mm Gyuto (present for a friend)

Both Japanese and western handles will be considered.

James
08-02-2013, 10:29 PM
budget?

Kumar
08-02-2013, 11:14 PM
Sorry, forgot that. 200-300$ each

Noodle Soup
08-02-2013, 11:23 PM
I've always wondered about the knives in India. Ancient country with a huge population. There must be some traditional patterns there but I certainly haven't found any mention of them.

Seb
08-03-2013, 03:30 AM
I've always wondered about the knives in India. Ancient country with a huge population. There must be some traditional patterns there but I certainly haven't found any mention of them.

Gonna go out on a limb and guess that the shelves are full of MICs (Made in China).

Seb
08-03-2013, 03:33 AM
OP, I would suggest something you can hone/steel: Masahiro MKV/MKB, Fujiwara-Kanefusa FKM/FKV, Sakai Yusuke, MAC Pro (all if these can be shipped to India direct from Japan, btw).

Mrmnms
08-03-2013, 04:38 AM
Curious why you can't bring a stone or 2 with your knives?

Brad Gibson
08-03-2013, 04:42 AM
Curious why you can't bring a stone or 2 with your knives?

I would recommend a stone mounted on a plastic base. Super lightweight and comes in varieties of grits

Noodle Soup
08-03-2013, 09:46 AM
Gonna go out on a limb and guess that the shelves are full of MICs (Made in China).

Every country in the world with anything close to free trade including Japan has racks of Chinese knives. But before those, there must have been some traditional patterns in India.

Kumar
08-03-2013, 10:16 AM
Curious why you can't bring a stone or 2 with your knives?

Weight is going to be a big issue, I have been in the US for 10.5 years now, moving back home. 2 bags, 23 pounds each. Every 0.5 lb counts

If I can fit it in at the end, I will take one.

Kumar
08-03-2013, 10:17 AM
I've always wondered about the knives in India. Ancient country with a huge population. There must be some traditional patterns there but I certainly haven't found any mention of them.

The ones you get from regular shops suck big time. Plus, most Indian homes are used to just having a paring knife for all their work.

Sorry DP.

Thanks for the suggestions, keep em coming

daveb
08-03-2013, 10:56 AM
Too many vegetarians in India to have a wide spectrum of knives. Not a fan of Santoku but Nakiri and short Gyuto are good choices. Diamond plate(s) may help meet your weight and cube requirements. And Maxim will ship knives, stones, just about anywhere.

BTW, $300 nakiri on b/s/t for $200 right now. (Hope shameless plugs ok)

Kumar
08-03-2013, 06:09 PM
Too many vegetarians in India to have a wide spectrum of knives. Not a fan of Santoku but Nakiri and short Gyuto are good choices. Diamond plate(s) may help meet your weight and cube requirements. And Maxim will ship knives, stones, just about anywhere.

BTW, $300 nakiri on b/s/t for $200 right now. (Hope shameless plugs ok)

Which one? I think they all sold out :(

Pensacola Tiger
08-03-2013, 06:53 PM
Which one? I think they all sold out :(

This one:

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/13715-FS-Delbert-Ealy-Nakiri

Seb
08-04-2013, 07:10 AM
Watching episode two of 'Rick Stein's India' where he uses what he calls 'my 40-rupee Indian knife' which to me looks like a KU-clad carbon nakiri with a curved blue plastic handle.

Kumar
08-04-2013, 09:51 AM
Got that Ealy Nakiri, suggestions on Santoku/Gyuto welcome!

mikemac
08-04-2013, 10:22 AM
Weight is going to be a big issue, I have been in the US for 10.5 years now, moving back home. 2 bags, 23 pounds each. Every 0.5 lb counts
....

Way under budget, but either the Hiromoto G3 or Carbonext for the santoku & gyuto. I have a G3 gyuto and I'm always amazed at how great a knife & value it is. I'm not much of a fan of the santoku & nakiri combo...so similiar in profile. But I do like the "half height" cleaver in place of the nakiri. JCK has one that's 220 x 83 for around $100.

For sharpening, you can get a whole lot of wet-dry for not much cash and it won't weigh much, but I'd recommend the Norton 1k/4k combo stone. It's big (8x3), got good grit combo, and not a lot of money.

Seriously, 3 knives and a stone for about one-half your intended budget - who says 12 step programs don't work!

Seb
08-05-2013, 12:16 AM
Every country in the world with anything close to free trade including Japan has racks of Chinese knives. But before those, there must have been some traditional patterns in India.

Say, what are those ones they use in the villages called where the cutting edge is mounted to a stand or pot?

Oh, here we go...

http://static1.demotix.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/l_crop_medium/100-0/photos/1259328583-blacksmith-making-and-displaying--cutting-utensils-in-dhaka_188730.jpg

Aha... 'Bonti':

http://www.indiacurry.com/faqappliance/traditionalindiankitchen.htm

Holy Moley!

http://ishouldcocoa.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/bd330.jpg?w=455&h=302

Amon-Rukh
08-05-2013, 12:25 AM
For the santoku I would check out maksim's zensho line at jns.

Noodle Soup
08-05-2013, 10:08 AM
I knew about bonti's but squatting on my heels with that big curved blade between my legs isn't something I'm really interested in doing. :) If you look close at that photo there also seem to be a large number of other types of knives behind the bonti's. Thanks for the photo Seb.