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View Full Version : Modern Cooking Techniques--Whats not in the book.



Mucho Bocho
08-06-2013, 09:54 AM
KKF has a some amazing chef's and cooks. I wanted to start a thread to capture any modern cooking techniques that you come up with.

I'm hoping to share and learn about techniques that you're created (or not but find useful) use to create new approaches and textures on classic foods.

For example:
Eggplant Gourging:
Traditional:
Peel, slice, salt, let weep for an hour or so.
Pat dry.
Use

Modern:
Peel, slice, salt, place in vac bag with paper towel, seal on medium pressure.
In 10 minutes, pull from the bag and use

Modern tip for Roasting/pan frying chicken with skin:
Putting a few pinches of Baking Soda on Chicken skin for enhanced Maillard

Modern Brining tip:
Add product to a large Mason canning Jar with brine. Leave 1 inch of headroom in jar. Pull max vacuum, brine with penetrate a dark meat chix on bone in 15 minutes.


Please share your experiments large or small.

Zwiefel
08-06-2013, 10:32 AM
Cool thread MB!

joetbn
08-10-2013, 04:06 AM
I don't know how modern this is, but it was new to me and is awsome: baby back ribs, dry rub overnight in fridge, double wrap in plastic wrap, wrap over that double aluminum foil, 200 degree oven for 8 hours. Finish 30 seconds per side on hot grill.

Mucho Bocho
08-10-2013, 09:50 AM
Good one Joe, Thanks for your conribution

Mucho Bocho
10-04-2013, 09:30 AM
I've been messing around with "pressure brining" lately. So I had a lean natural pork tenderloin that I needed to prep and cook within an hour. I don't like to roast pork at high temp as it gets tough, but I didn't have time to pump and tumble it. So I cleaned all silver skin and sinu and went over it with the Jaccquard, the put it into a quart canning jar with

4 cups distilled water
TSP FAB phosphates
TSP Baking Soda
TSP Sodium Erythrobate
TSP Mortons Quick Tender
2 TBLS kosher salt

Pulled the highest vaccum and let it sit in the water for 20 minutes, shaking it now and then. then I pulled, washed, dried, tied, pan seared and roasted it for another 30 min at 375 degrees. Put butter on top, loosly tented and rested for 20 min.

Was the best tenderloin I've ever had. Fork tender, juicy, meat tasting, not salty but very savory. There was enough natural juice in the meat that is made ist own jus. Just a touch pink in the center. I'm kicking myself that I didn't take any pics.

Zwiefel
10-04-2013, 10:39 AM
Interesting, I gotta get a vac....<sigh> Was it pork loin? or pork tenderloin? 30min @ 375 sounds like a lot for the slender, lean tenderloin.

Z

I've been messing around with "pressure brining" lately. So I had a lean natural pork tenderloin that I needed to prep and cook within an hour. I don't like to roast pork at high temp as it gets tough, but I didn't have time to pump and tumble it. So I cleaned all silver skin and sinu and went over it with the Jaccquard, the put it into a quart canning jar with

4 cups distilled water
TSP FAB phosphates
TSP Baking Soda
TSP Sodium Erythrobate
TSP Mortons Quick Tender
2 TBLS kosher salt

Pulled the highest vaccum and let it sit in the water for 20 minutes, shaking it now and then. then I pulled, washed, dried, tied, pan seared and roasted it for another 30 min at 375 degrees. Put butter on top, loosly tented and rested for 20 min.

Was the best tenderloin I've ever had. Fork tender, juicy, meat tasting, not salty but very savory. There was enough natural juice in the meat that is made ist own jus. Just a touch pink in the center. I'm kicking myself that I didn't take any pics.

Mucho Bocho
10-04-2013, 02:18 PM
Danny, Yea it was Pork loin, pulled the meat at 148 degrees internally, rest rose to 155, juicy and lightly rosey pink.

Bill13
10-11-2013, 10:35 AM
Interesting, I gotta get a vac....<sigh> Was it pork loin? or pork tenderloin? 30min @ 375 sounds like a lot for the slender, lean tenderloin.

Z

I'm still waiting for you to get one too so I can read your review! Get it before Christmas so I can have it under the tree - if you like it that is!

Zwiefel
10-11-2013, 11:02 AM
ha! After the last 10 weeks I've had...I think I will buy one as soon as things settle in a couple of weeks. I deserve it GDit! :)

Mucho Bocho
11-06-2013, 05:14 PM
Tip:
Wrap proteins in shrink before vac sealing. I've used this technique with scallops but I kinda stumbled when working with bone-in meats just trying to protect the bag from getting pierced from those sharp edges of the meat bone. The benefit is that the meat stays exactly the shape that it started. The muscles haven't separated making post SV sear easier.

jgraeff
11-07-2013, 01:13 AM
i love this thread, good techniques.

another tip for Maillard reaction is using skimmed milk powder, i use this for stocks on bones etc but it works well on proteins to.