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View Full Version : MAC superior bread knife vs Tojiro ITK bread knife especially for cutting cakes and other pastries



Flyingpigg
08-08-2013, 03:38 PM
I'm looking to purchase one of these two knives because they have the scalloped serrations, and I've read repeatedly that they create less crumbs during. I've been making a lot of cakes recently, and I'm really interested in getting one of these two knives to reduce the crumbs created when I'm leveling cakes.

It seems right now, the Tojiro ITK will cost me about 60 dollars, and the MAC Superior is about 90. I know 30 bucks isn't that much, but still an extra 50% cost compared to the Tojiro. Is it worth the extra 30 bucks to get the MAC as oppose to the Tojiro? It seems that the Tojiro has a slightly larger handle, and the Tojiro has more aggressive serrations. I feel like the larger handle on the Tojiro may reduce knuckle clearance, and the more aggressive serrations may cause more crumb creation. However, I can't tell if Tojiro has done something to compensate for the larger handles, and whether or not the more aggressive serrations cut faster with minimal increase in crumb creation. In addition, from some brief scanning through this forum's post history, I've seen some complaints from others about Tojiro's quality control, and some of the ITK bread knives are shipping with a heavy burr, although correcting this issue doesn't seem to be too difficult. What other differences are there between the two knives, and does anyone have any experience regarding the two knives' edge retention? I'm willing to try sharpening these knives, but I'd like to do it as little as possible as I want don't risk changing the serration pattern too much.

I also have some questions about the sharpening of these knives. I think I get how to use the corners of a waterstone to follow the curve, but will having rounded corners affect how well this technique works? Are there any special considerations when it comes to sharpening these knives? I was planning on just following my typical progression of stones (my set up right now is a King 1k, Bester 2k, and Suehiro Rika 5k), but I was thinking I might just use the Bester 2k only.

mainaman
08-08-2013, 06:44 PM
IIRC the Tjiro is a slightly modified copy of the MAC (I did not follow the ITK design thread too closely but that is my take of it), I think the steel is the same as well.

Dave Martell
08-08-2013, 07:42 PM
FWIW, the MAC has reverse serrations (AKA scallops) while the Tojiro has rounded over tips (standard serrations that have been blunted).

chinacats
08-08-2013, 07:49 PM
I bought a Tojiro but sent it back...piss poor fit and finish. Poor fitting handle with large gaps and weird burr on edge.

Cheers!

Drum N Baste
08-08-2013, 08:05 PM
In my experience, having used both, I find the MAC to be the superior knife in terms of both performance and F&F. By a fine margin. Neither one is a good substitute for an extremely thin, highly polished sujihiki when it comes to smooth, crumb-free cutting.

tripleq
08-08-2013, 08:06 PM
Well not to confuse the issue but I have owned both knives and I found both inferior to the Misono moly bread knife. The issue of crumbs for me is not about scallops vs serrations. They may play into cutting efficiency but I think there are more factors at play. I found that both of those knives did much more tearing than cutting when compared to the Misono. The misono is an absolutely awesome cutter. It is so sharp it will tear a cutting board apart and it will stay that way for a long time. It is a bit more expensive but well worth a look.

Seb
08-08-2013, 08:16 PM
I have the Tojiro and the FF on it is good but I never use it because my Sab does the trick just fine.

Flyingpigg
08-08-2013, 09:01 PM
FWIW, the MAC has reverse serrations (AKA scallops) while the Tojiro has rounded over tips (standard serrations that have been blunted).

How can you tell the difference? They look the same in the pictures to me.

Dave Martell
08-08-2013, 09:08 PM
FWIW, the MAC has reverse serrations (AKA scallops) while the Tojiro has rounded over tips (standard serrations that have been blunted).


How can you tell the difference? They look the same in the pictures to me.


If you could see them side by side you'd be able to tell.

Flyingpigg
08-08-2013, 09:51 PM
Well not to confuse the issue but I have owned both knives and I found both inferior to the Misono moly bread knife. The issue of crumbs for me is not about scallops vs serrations. They may play into cutting efficiency but I think there are more factors at play. I found that both of those knives did much more tearing than cutting when compared to the Misono. The misono is an absolutely awesome cutter. It is so sharp it will tear a cutting board apart and it will stay that way for a long time. It is a bit more expensive but well worth a look.

A Misono moly will be easier to sharpen too. Also, I've heard that scalloped serrations are a bit tricky to use for really crusty breads, did you notice this at all?

tripleq
08-08-2013, 10:19 PM
A Misono moly will be easier to sharpen too. Also, I've heard that scalloped serrations are a bit tricky to use for really crusty breads, did you notice this at all?

Yes they are pretty easy to sharpen. I did mine last week for the first time. No actually I don't notice any issue with crusty bread. The knife does really well with it. It is a very good cutter. When I said it would tear up a cutting board I wasn't being dramatic. It will tear up your board. It works great with pretty much anything with a hard exterior and soft interior. I use it for watermelons all summer.

Flyingpigg
08-08-2013, 10:27 PM
No actually I don't notice any issue with crusty bread.

It seems like you're talking about the Misono, not the MAC. I was more curious about the MAC as while I like Misono, I won't be able to afford it for awhile. I'm currently using a Victorinox bread knife, and I'll probably just make the jump to get the Misono next, although I'm going to work on getting a nicer gyuto and suijhiki before spending 130 bucks on a bread knife.

tripleq
08-08-2013, 10:47 PM
It seems like you're talking about the Misono, not the MAC. I was more curious about the MAC as while I like Misono, I won't be able to afford it for awhile. I'm currently using a Victorinox bread knife, and I'll probably just make the jump to get the Misono next, although I'm going to work on getting a nicer gyuto and suijhiki before spending 130 bucks on a bread knife.

Oh sorry a out that. I didn't find the MAC or the Tojiro particularly inefficient but neither of them did hard and crusty as well as the Misono. They required more pressure to get started. Of course I didn't mean to sound like the Misono was the only option. The other two are capable blades.

Chefdog
08-08-2013, 11:00 PM
A Misono moly will be easier to sharpen too. Also, I've heard that scalloped serrations are a bit tricky to use for really crusty breads, did you notice this at all?

I find the tojiro (the only one I have used) to work very well for crusty breads, with less tearing than you may get from a conventional serrated edge. Picture dragging the blade through a really crusty "ridge" where the loaf has been scored. Regular serrations can tear and "chip out" that crust while the scalloped edge will initially skip a little before cutting through w/o ripping the bread up.