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Julian Nell
08-19-2013, 11:44 PM
What do I need?

For my first sharpening setup, I want to get either the King #1000 or the King #1000&#6000 combo stone, but I don't know if I need anything else. So, what do I need aside from the stone?

Thanks,
Julian

tripleq
08-19-2013, 11:46 PM
Many people get by with that selection just fine. It depends on what you are sharpening and what your goals are.

Julian Nell
08-20-2013, 12:04 AM
After reviewing my enitial post, I don't think I was clear enough. I am asking about things like stone fixes.

CanadianMan
08-20-2013, 12:05 AM
Besides a stone you will need a flattening stone or diamond plate to keep your stone flat, a damp towel to keep your stone from moving when you are sharpening, and a container big enough to soak your stone in water ( unless it is a splash and go stone)

chinacats
08-20-2013, 12:06 AM
If you're on a budget, you can use the sidewalk...or drywall screen on a flat surface. The other side of the coin is a diamond plate. I myself use a cheapo Norton fixer.

pkjames
08-20-2013, 12:07 AM
you can lap two stones together, or another way is to get some dry/wet sandpaper, stick on a piece of MDF / glass / whatever flat surface, and lap the stone on the sandpaper.

of course, the best way is to get a diamond plate, but it would cost more than the stone you are buying.

spaceconvoy
08-20-2013, 01:39 AM
Drywall screen on a flat surface is the best cheap option - better than sandpaper since the mesh keeps it from overloading with mud. And unless you have really nice sidewalks, I'd advise against that too.

I'd recommend the King combo stone, because it won't be your last, and it'll give you a chance to try a higher grit finish.

Julian Nell
08-20-2013, 01:47 PM
Thanks for all the great suggestions!

mpukas
08-20-2013, 05:49 PM
+1 to drywall sanding screen. I use it on a piece of 12"x12"x1/2" marble tile that I picked up a stone yard. I use large sheets - 8" x 10" or whatever they are at the hardware store. An advantage is that the surface is much much bigger than the stone so I think that's better for flattening. Some stone fixers I see are too small - not much bigger than sharpening stone, and it doesn't make sense to me that you could get an evenly flat surface. Keeping a stone flats also entails keeping it level from side to side and end to end.

I also recommend getting a stone holder. You can pick up one with two rods for around $15 if you shop around enough. Very handy to have.

Julian Nell
08-20-2013, 06:12 PM
Would someone mind posting a picture of there drywall sanding screen setup? I'm having a hard time trying to imagine it. Also, where should I buy it?

Colorado_cutter
08-20-2013, 06:46 PM
I don't have photos of my setup, but you can visualize. On your work surface (counter, whatever) you place your flat thing (a big tile, whatever- mine is a piece of scrap acrylic). Then, you put your drywall screen on top of that. It's like sandpaper, but more mesh-like. Then, you rub your stone on top of the screen to flatten it out. It helps to draw a series of exes or hatches with a pencil all along the surface of the stone. When you've flattened enough that the marks are faint or gone, then you're done.

You can get drywall screen at a hardware store. My local big-box store (not sure if it was Lowes or Home Depot) just had smaller pieces designed to fit into some sort of holder, so that's what I'm using, but when I use up these, I'll pick up some 8" x 10" size pieces I saw recently at a better hardware store.

Julian Nell
08-20-2013, 07:17 PM
Okay, I think I have got it. Does it matter what brand it is? or are they all pretty much the same?

Seb
08-21-2013, 02:56 AM
I have Full size Diamond plates but I never use them. I actually much prefer these little diamond files that they sell is a finish sanding Snow skis. Diaface Moonflex From eBay, Very inexpensive and they last for ever

Ruso
08-21-2013, 11:28 AM
Okay, I think I have got it. Does it matter what brand it is? or are they all pretty much the same?
Any will do. I use Norton because it is available at my Home Depot. 3M is often recommended as well. I find the drywall screen to work very well for on budget solution. Never the less coarse diamond plate looks to be more convenient but comes at premium cost as well. I am still saving ;)

schanop
08-21-2013, 05:10 PM
I have Full size Diamond plates but I never use them. I actually much prefer these little diamond files that they sell is a finish sanding Snow skis. Diaface Moonflex From eBay, Very inexpensive and they last for ever

If it is an atoma 140, would you like to off load?

Julian Nell
08-27-2013, 05:52 PM
So, I got the stone yesterday and wanted some conformation on the process.
Soak the stone for 15 minutes,
Place it where ever I will sharpen, with access to water,
Make sure the stone stays wet throughout the sharpening process,
Figure out my angles,
Keep the knife at a 45ish degree angle,
And I will sharpen in sections keeping my fingers in the middle of the stone.

Is there anything else I need to do?

mhlee
08-27-2013, 06:23 PM
Don't focus so much on an angle of the knife to the stone. You may need to change the angle of the knife to the stone depending on what part of the knife you're sharpening. Watch videos of Jon Broida and Murray Carter. They both change the angle of the knife to the stone depending on what and where they're sharpening. Figure out what's comfortable and works for you. Then practice, again and again.

Julian Nell
08-27-2013, 06:30 PM
I have watched all of the videos in Jon's sharpening playlist, I haven't watched any of Murray's videos though.

Von blewitt
08-27-2013, 06:31 PM
+1 practice! Also check your work frequently

Julian Nell
08-27-2013, 07:00 PM
Should I be following the bevel already on it, it looks to be about 70/30, or focus on getting the correct angles by myself?

JBroida
08-27-2013, 07:09 PM
in the beginning, its a better idea to follow whats there

mhlee
08-27-2013, 07:17 PM
Should I be following the bevel already on it, it looks to be about 70/30, or focus on getting the correct angles by myself?

Again, don't focus on "angles" or numbers. I don't know where people get this stuck in their heads, but angles are not the guiding rule for knives. The knife should guide the type of angle that you use.

The actual angle of the bevel will differ based on the area you sharpen, e.g., the tip is thinner than the heel, so the angle that you're holding your knife at will differ from the heel vs. the tip to get the same bevel angle and bevel size. So, since you're just starting, I would use the magic marker/Sharpie trick, and focus on the existing bevels.

(I'm not intentionally regurgitating what Jon wrote because I didn't see that he posted before I did. But, Jon explained this to me and it was an important starting point because I had basically had to unlearn some serious misconceptions and incorrect practices about sharpening first before starting to sharpen again using better practices.)

Julian Nell
08-27-2013, 07:17 PM
Sounds good. Now all I have to do is work up the courage to start.

Julian Nell
08-27-2013, 07:20 PM
I believe, Jon said in his video about the magic marker trick that you can use nail Polish remover to get the excess marker off; are there any other methods for getting it off?

JBroida
08-27-2013, 07:21 PM
i use straight acetone ;)

mhlee
08-27-2013, 07:22 PM
Sounds good. Now all I have to do is work up the courage to start.

One last thing. Use light pressure since you're worried about making a mistake. A mistake using light pressure will be a much smaller mistake than one using a lot of pressure.

Julian Nell
08-27-2013, 10:07 PM
Okay. I don't have a magic marker or acetone right now, so I might try it without until I get those two things.

Pensacola Tiger
08-27-2013, 10:13 PM
I believe, Jon said in his video about the magic marker trick that you can use nail Polish remover to get the excess marker off; are there any other methods for getting it off?

Goo Gone works also, and doesn't evaporate as quickly.

chinacats
08-27-2013, 10:14 PM
If the bevel is big enough to see then it is likely big enough to feel on the stones. You should be able to see what part of the edge you are hitting because it will be shiny. As said above, go slow and use light pressure and it will be fine

Matus
08-28-2013, 01:00 AM
I believe, Jon said in his video about the magic marker trick that you can use nail Polish remover to get the excess marker off; are there any other methods for getting it off?

Since magic markers are mostly alcohol-based, you can use Vodka or even classical man's aftershave lotion - as long as it contains enough alcohol - just depends what kind of smell you want to end up with ;)

ThEoRy
08-28-2013, 01:35 AM
I believe, Jon said in his video about the magic marker trick that you can use nail Polish remover to get the excess marker off; are there any other methods for getting it off?

Shouldn't you be sharpening it off? Where is the excess coming from if you only painted the edge?

JBroida
08-28-2013, 01:44 AM
you should be painting more than just the edge... also the area behind the edge

ThEoRy
08-28-2013, 01:57 AM
Yeah not just the edge that currently exists I get that but I've never painted more than will be removed. Sometimes there might be a little bit of ink higher up on accident but Not so much to where I need acetone or anything. It usually just wipes right off anyway. :dontknow:

JBroida
08-28-2013, 02:11 AM
i color in more all of the time... it helps people see whats going on much more clearly

CrisAnderson27
08-28-2013, 02:52 AM
I believe, Jon said in his video about the magic marker trick that you can use nail Polish remover to get the excess marker off; are there any other methods for getting it off?

I was using Windex on my DMT plates to sharpen.

It seems to remove Sharpie alllll on its own, lol.

Anyhow, since you're not using Windex with your stones, I wanted to let you know. Its a quick way to remove the excess Sharpie. Spray down, wipe, done.

ChuckTheButcher
08-28-2013, 03:53 AM
I've never had a problem getting the ink from a sharpie off with just water.

ChuckTheButcher
08-28-2013, 04:18 AM
Also Dave's video is very helpful. It really covers the wire edge that you tend to get with Japanese knives. I would suggest getting some cheaper knives and practicing a lot. Most everything but the worst mistakes can be fixed. I find what hinders people wanting to learn to sharpen the most is being scared to do it. So they let their knives get insanely dull. Just getting the knife to the stone will make you more confident. Don't get too frustrated if you don't have a razor your first few times. Just try to make the edge better then what you started with. It's kinda like riding a bike. One day you just sort of get it.

daveb
08-28-2013, 04:14 PM
If there is a female in your household there will be nail polish remover. Prob cotton balls as well. Polish remover is 2 bucks for a small bottle. Acetone is 2 bucks for a large bottle. Not sure of any other difference:cool2:

Hangman
11-18-2013, 07:30 AM
If there is a female in your household there will be nail polish remover. Prob cotton balls as well. Polish remover is 2 bucks for a small bottle. Acetone is 2 bucks for a large bottle. Not sure of any other difference:cool2:

just to throw out something you may have laying around the house...good old fashioned lighter fluid for the Zippo type lighters was made with naphtha that works to get it off too.

Hangman
11-18-2013, 07:33 AM
I have a question about the drywall screen since that is more than likely what I will use right out of the gate.

Do you need to fix it to the flat surface (ie marble tile etc ) or can you just lay it on there?

If you do adhere or fix it what and how do you do that?