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Gravy Power
09-02-2013, 01:39 AM
What are your preffered ways of seasoning proteins as far as timing before cooking? I hear contradicotry arguments. I always believed salting one mintue before cookery was ideal. Too much longer and you risk steaming. Someone recently tried to tell me that while water is brought to the surface, it is reabsorbed.

Zwiefel
09-02-2013, 02:14 AM
With some proteins (salmon comes to mind) the salt will draw other material to the surface (proteins?) and create a crust called a pellicle <sp?> that contributes strongly to crust formation.

I think a similar thing happens with beef.

for pork, lamb, and fowl, I would salt immediately before.

but maybe I'm just about to learn something :)

Gravy Power
09-02-2013, 02:36 AM
With some proteins (salmon comes to mind) the salt will draw other material to the surface (proteins?) and create a crust called a pellicle <sp?> that contributes strongly to crust formation.

I think a similar thing happens with beef.

for pork, lamb, and fowl, I would salt immediately before.

but maybe I'm just about to learn something :)

I was tought with brines, is alway best to take them out to let the pellicle (yeah I don't know if I'm spelingl that right either :doublethumbsup:) form. A good amount of time. I'm not sure the same applied to unbrined meats though.

boomchakabowwow
09-02-2013, 02:38 AM
it really depends. i typically brine pork

chicken, i salt them and wrap it in plastic, for about 8 hours. same with thick beef..like roast. especially the tougher cuts. i find salt tenderizes as well as seasons.

steaks..i salt when i start the coals..so about 20 minutes. i always blot everything dry with a paper towel to remove moisture.

salt has powerful juju.

brainsausage
09-02-2013, 03:17 AM
Salt tenderizes and develops flavor. The sooner you season the better. In my experience its best to give a light dusting as soon as you portion. With oily fish/tuna, give a heavy sprinkling for roughly 30-45 minutes, depending on the density, then soak in water for 15-20. Helps tighten the flesh. With all land animals, give it a light coat of neutral oil( to deter oxidation ), and season liberally. It both preserves and flavors. Ideally- you want to cook not long after portioning, but if you have a nice cold fridge, and the time to spare, meats benefit greatly from a light salt treatment, over the course of 12-24 hours. IMO...

brainsausage
09-02-2013, 03:18 AM
I brine a lot too, (just brined 200# pork butt and 200# brisket), I just thought this thread was referring to fresh cuts...

Stumblinman
09-02-2013, 03:19 AM
I've only experimented with beef filet. 3 pieces and S&P at different times. 1 5 mins before, 1 1 min before and 1 right before hitting the pan. You can see the water form on the surface of the ones salted 1 and 5 mins before hitting the pan. But after cooking the same. (was medallions) There was no real noticeable difference in texture and 'juiciness'. It's an interesting and tasty experiment. You can see the water forming on the surface before your eyes. I'm sure there's other variables and things to look for.

Zwiefel
09-02-2013, 03:57 AM
I brine a lot too... I just thought this thread was referring to fresh cuts...

:plus1:

franzb69
09-02-2013, 03:59 AM
i brine chicken every once in a while, i couldn't wait to just stick the chicken in the chiller and dry up the skin and then roast them. so i always end up getting floppy skin on my chicken. lol.

haven't tried brining pork yet. i do cure my own bacon though.

i like salting my beef and other red meats right before frying them or before sticking them in the oven.

GlassEye
09-02-2013, 04:27 AM
I really like salting beef early, up to 24 hours if I can. Salmon about 30 mins before. Chicken early if skin on, otherwise fairly close to cooking. Drying the surface right before cooking helps with a nice crust, in my experience. Does anyone else put a bit extra salt on fatty areas, I do this with beef especially, seems to help render and crisp the fat.

heirkb
09-02-2013, 11:20 AM
Check out the salting steak tips here: http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/03/the-food-lab-more-tips-for-perfect-steaks.html

I tend to salt a lot of tough or large cuts way ahead. The few kitchens I've been in have done it that way and based on what I've read as well, it makes sense. I guess I should try it with more tender stuff like chicken breast or steaks, too. Check out this kinda famous roast chicken recipe: http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/12/zuni-cafe-roast-chicken-bread-salad/
I really should do a side-by-side, but these have been the best roast chickens I've made up to this point. It may be the two to three days of drying the skin, though, so I can't be sure.

mhlee
09-02-2013, 12:18 PM
After reading that Serious Eats article, I tried salting larger cuts of meat early. I've since done that as much as possible for steaks, fish, pork, etc. because the results are so much better.

I actually prefer salting hours in advance if I can, and even overnight for larger cuts. The meat has a deeper, richer flavor. (If you like the crunch of exterior salt, you can always add some at the last minute.) I put the salted protein on rack, loosely tent with plastic wrap and flip once halfway through the salting time.

I try to season meats I'm going to barbecue at least 12 hours and up to 36 hours in advance. The only items that I haven't done this for are shrimp, scallops, or thinner cuts of fish.

heirkb
09-02-2013, 12:48 PM
After reading that Serious Eats article, I tried salting larger cuts of meat early. I've since done that as much as possible for steaks, fish, pork, etc. because the results are so much better.

I actually prefer salting hours in advance if I can, and even overnight for larger cuts. The meat has a deeper, richer flavor. (If you like the crunch of exterior salt, you can always add some at the last minute.) I put the salted protein on rack, loosely tent with plastic wrap and flip once halfway through the salting time.

I try to season meats I'm going to barbecue at least 12 hours and up to 36 hours in advance. The only items that I haven't done this for are shrimp, scallops, or thinner cuts of fish.

I'll do some side by sides to see if I can notice a difference. I've been doing up to 3 days in advance with things like whole chickens, pork butts, etc...never tasted too salty, but then again, I like the super super salty fond at the bottom of the pan, so I may have saltier tastes.

jbl
10-29-2013, 02:02 PM
I pretty much lightly salt most of the white fish we get in at work. Just firms it up.

jgraeff
10-29-2013, 06:54 PM
It depends on the method of cooking as well, with searing or satue I like to season things like scallops and fish right before so it doesn't draw out much water.

With beef as soon as I take it out of the fridge until it comes to room temp then cook

With pork I like to brine

Chicken can be brined or let sit for a while.

Bill13
10-30-2013, 11:19 AM
Check out the salting steak tips here: http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/03/the-food-lab-more-tips-for-perfect-steaks.html

I tend to salt a lot of tough or large cuts way ahead. The few kitchens I've been in have done it that way and based on what I've read as well, it makes sense. I guess I should try it with more tender stuff like chicken breast or steaks, too. Check out this kinda famous roast chicken recipe: http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/12/zuni-cafe-roast-chicken-bread-salad/
I really should do a side-by-side, but these have been the best roast chickens I've made up to this point. It may be the two to three days of drying the skin, though, so I can't be sure.

Another great website that I didn't know about!