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ejd53
09-11-2013, 11:53 PM
As some of you may remember, I started trying to make a saya for one of Devin's "spicy white steel" knives. After making it, I found that I was not satisfied and in typical fashion for me, proceeded to go off of the deep end and make a few more sayas (including a new one for Devin's knife. Thought I would show you how I'm progressing.

First, Devin's knife (original and replacement, both made of curly maple)
18588
original
18589
replacement

next, a couple of Del's knives (both in poplar)
18590
Gyuto
18591
Paring

A couple of Will's

18592
Gyuto in Bloodwood

18593
and a Nakiri in Paduk

18594
A Marko Gyuto in Bubinga

18595
HHH Gyuto in Yellowheart

18596
Pierre Suji in Walnut

18597
and a Pierre Petty in Cocobolo

I am currently working on a couple of others, which I hope to have done in a day or so. I have learned a lot of things doing this, primarily that I need to invest in a a band saw and a belt sander. Doing it by hand, while satisfying, is very slow.
Any comments on the work or on recommendations for power equipment would be welcome.:biggrin: I will add to this as I finish the others.

Baby Huey
09-12-2013, 12:14 AM
Awesome work. Keep it up.

sachem allison
09-12-2013, 12:26 AM
very nice!

Anton
09-12-2013, 01:05 AM
Very nice. Any pics of the spines and coil area?

Dream Burls
09-12-2013, 08:05 AM
Amazing that you can do such fine work by hand. Probably won't get much better with power tools, but it will go a lot faster. Keep up the good work.

NO ChoP!
09-12-2013, 08:24 AM
Looking good my man!

I use a cheap ryobi band saw and drill press, and am currently using an even cheaper 1x30 hf sander. I do plan on upgrading to a Kalamazoo 10" disc/ 2x48" belt combo soon...

Lefty
09-12-2013, 09:21 AM
These look really good! You might find that power tools just take more off, more quickly. At first you might lose a few, or have to tweak them as you go, but once you get used to it you'll be all good. I still do a lot of shaping by hand, and every piece is rough cut, and "finessed" with hand tools. That Dozuki saw I purchased was a true game changer for work like this.

* For the heck of it, I'm going to add that I really like to work the all poplar sayas, lately, which is a shocker for me. You can find surprisingly nicely grained pieces and they shape like buttah!

ejd53
09-12-2013, 10:15 AM
These look really good! You might find that power tools just take more off, more quickly. At first you might lose a few, or have to tweak them as you go, but once you get used to it you'll be all good. I still do a lot of shaping by hand, and every piece is rough cut, and "finessed" with hand tools. That Dozuki saw I purchased was a true game changer for work like this.

* For the heck of it, I'm going to add that I really like to work the all poplar sayas, lately, which is a shocker for me. You can find surprisingly nicely grained pieces and they shape like buttah!

Yes, the Poplar is by far the easiest to shape and cut. It also has the advantage of being soft and easy on the blades and is the closest relative of the traditional Ho wood used in Japan for saya making. There is a reason they used it. I have been thinking of doing all of my sayas in poplar and then perhaps doing inlays of other wood for decoration. I guess the traditional way to do it would be to lacquer it.

Mrmnms
09-12-2013, 10:36 AM
I think your sayas are stunning. I hope you didn't fully scrap the first one. It was beautiful .

ejd53
09-12-2013, 10:54 AM
I think your sayas are stunning. I hope you didn't fully scrap the first one. It was beautiful .

Nope, still have it. I am thinking of using it to make some other paring knife sayas. Just haven't figured out quite how I want to do it yet.

Korin_Mari
09-12-2013, 11:22 AM
Awesome! :)

3200+++
09-13-2013, 03:08 AM
very nice!

apathetic
09-15-2013, 12:25 PM
This is really impressive!

ejd53
09-16-2013, 03:30 PM
Just finished another one. This is Will's 200 mm "Red Shark" gyuto in figured redwood. Interestingly, this one turned out to be more difficult than expected. The redwood is soft enough that I had some problems with tear-out while dealing with the figures. It was slow going.

18675

Baby Huey
09-16-2013, 03:36 PM
very nice.

ejd53
09-16-2013, 03:42 PM
Very nice. Any pics of the spines and coil area?

Here you go.

18676
This is in Poplar

18677
Curly Maple

18678
Yellowheart

18679
Bubinga

18680
Bubinga

18681
Bubinga

18683
Paduk

18684
Paduk

Anton
09-16-2013, 04:04 PM
very nice sir

WillC
09-16-2013, 06:21 PM
Nice, getting better and better.:doublethumbsup:

reedux
12-27-2013, 02:53 AM
Sorry for bringing this thread back from the dead, but ejd53, if you can share your process of how you made these, I think it would be very helpful to myself and others who might get inspired to try it themselves.

I actually made a saya with walnut wood and a dremel. It's not as clean as yours, but glue-time aside, really only took me about an hour. I just routed out the shape of the blade on two planks of wood and sandwiched them.

Also, where did you procure some of the rarer woods you've used (bloodwood, cocobolo, etc.)?

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-bU5SoqOtc2g/Ur0x0ja98vI/AAAAAAAAABk/H-wisfkot5Q/w1518-h548-no/Untitled-1.jpg

crunchy
12-27-2013, 10:38 AM
You can purchase Bloodwood and cocobolo at woodcraft, and a few other nice exotics.

Great looking sayas!