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View Full Version : Goat - it's what's for dinner.



bear1889
10-12-2013, 07:32 PM
I have a halal goat shoulder (cut up by butcher) braising in the oven with thyme, rosemary, pepper, a little sea salt, olive oil, onion, sweet red pepper and a little chianti rufina.

Anybody ever work with it before?

sachem allison
10-12-2013, 08:33 PM
That is one thing I have never been able to enjoy the taste of. that and wild boar, yellow mustard, sea cucumbers, whale blubber, fermented fish paste and goat cheese.

EdipisReks
10-12-2013, 08:35 PM
I love goat. I've never made a whole shoulder. I also love wild boar, yellow mustard, sea cucumber, fermented fish pate and goat cheese. Never had whale blubber. :)

brianh
10-12-2013, 09:14 PM
I share in the yellow mustard hatred. And clam jerky. Sorry, don't mean to derail the thread....

GeneH
10-12-2013, 09:22 PM
Nope, but am I late for supper? Sounds really good actually. I have no idea what chianti rufina is, but I use the same herbs when doing venison in the crock, with the addition of garlic cloves.

bear1889
10-12-2013, 09:30 PM
That is one thing I have never been able to enjoy the taste of. that and wild boar, yellow mustard, sea cucumbers, whale blubber, fermented fish paste and goat cheese.

I find that goat is not as gamey as compared to lamb. It could be where it is raised at, this was raised in Indiana. Actually very mild. Now goat milk I cannot even be in the same room with it.

sachem allison
10-12-2013, 11:26 PM
most of the goat I have had has been from small ranches in the back country of Mexico. I ate it because, it was made special for me and that's what you do,lol. God knows what those little buggers ate.( actually, I know what they ate and most of the guys here would rather smoke it than eat it.lol)

franzb69
10-13-2013, 06:11 AM
goat on a spit with tamarind leaves, lemon grass, salt and pepper. you'd be pretty much all good with that.

not that it's easy to get tamarind leaves just anywhere.

Zwiefel
10-13-2013, 11:24 AM
I've found that age make a big difference with goat. Younger, pinker goat is more tender and less gamey.


I find that goat is not as gamey as compared to lamb. It could be where it is raised at, this was raised in Indiana. Actually very mild. Now goat milk I cannot even be in the same room with it.

+1 on the lamb.

Ive

Lucretia
10-13-2013, 02:11 PM
I've never had it, but am thinning the cookbook herd and just came across this recipe:

1 young goat
cumin seeds
chili powder
salt
black pepper
lard

Dress the goat carefully. If hair gets in contact with the meat, it imparts an unpleasant flavor. Combine all of the seasonings or sprinkle separately over the goat. Cover the entire goat with lard. Wrap & cover with a clean white sack & then wrap in a burlap bag. Place in a pit where fire has been burning for several hours. Lay the prepared goat in a layer of ashes over hot coals, cover with dirt & leave all night.

(I think this cookbook is a keeper!)

sachem allison
10-13-2013, 04:04 PM
in other words set it on fire and bury it.

boomchakabowwow
10-14-2013, 10:57 AM
hahhaha..

i was sitting next to a buddy. both of us were watching deer. with bow/arrows ready. from the right steps out these three old billy goats. the rancher earlier gave us the "Green light" to remove those @#%$@$%@%! goats from his property.

i whispered, "dusty, dont you dare shoot that goat!"...

i heard the arrow zipping thru the atmosphere a mere second later..haha. we found that animal with our noses as much as our eyes. it smelled like a dirty barn. we gutted it, butchered it. i took a shoulder home. my mom was so mad we made her kitchen smell like that. my stepdad, a pro chef, turned it into the best slow cooked thai curry. we inhaled it. (not my mom). that ranch has two more renegade goats..i will have an arrow ready.

goat is the world's meat. only the USA holds it in such low regard.

aaamax
10-15-2013, 07:26 PM
I also love wild boar, yellow mustard, sea cucumber, fermented fish pate and goat cheese.

There's a Swedish menu for you!

Goat rocks! As with so many misc meats, Low and Slow is the Only way to heat this beast. All the classic southern euro herbs work. And best of all it is CHEAP. I used to go to the Mexican markets in San Diego and buy goat shoulder for 35c a pound. They'd cut it up for you if you want, but go whole if at all possible and cover it while it bakes with all the roots and peppers.
God DAmn... Get the Bohemia chilled, Fry up some tortillas and a big bowl of sour cream with mashed garlic... I"m hungry.

boomchakabowwow
10-17-2013, 12:35 PM
There's a Swedish menu for you!

Goat rocks! As with so many misc meats, Low and Slow is the Only way to heat this beast. All the classic southern euro herbs work. And best of all it is CHEAP. I used to go to the Mexican markets in San Diego and buy goat shoulder for 35c a pound. They'd cut it up for you if you want, but go whole if at all possible and cover it while it bakes with all the roots and peppers.
God DAmn... Get the Bohemia chilled, Fry up some tortillas and a big bowl of sour cream with mashed garlic... I"m hungry.

this thread inspired me to shop for goat. my local mexican grocery store sucked..all the goat meat was randomly cut. i couldnt (and neither could the butcher) i.d. a shoulder part.

i passed. i'll hit up a bigger market this weekend.

bear1889
10-17-2013, 12:40 PM
Try and do a halal meat market search for the Bay Area, they should have it, that's where I picked mine up in Kentucky.

boomchakabowwow
10-17-2013, 01:38 PM
Try and do a halal meat market search for the Bay Area, they should have it, that's where I picked mine up in Kentucky.

great idea!! thanks.

man, my next door neighbor owns a halal meat market. slapping forehead now. duh!

Sambal
10-17-2013, 07:06 PM
Back in the 60s I liked a goat soup that you could could get from the Indian Muslim stalls in Malaysia. The genuine stuff made by the 'Mamaks' (slang for 'Mohamed') is an aromatic and spiced (coriander, cumin, cardomom, cinnamon, pepper, cloves, galangal, among some others but no chily from memory) thick soup, slow simmered for hours. The goat (called mutton by the Mamaks) would include lots of the heavy bones cracked to release the marrow wasn't at all gamey or rank. This may be because of the type of goats there.

If you're interested google 'sup kambing' (kambing = goat). Great for a cold night I'd imagine.

A 'mutton' rendang is also a great way to have goat.

franzb69
10-17-2013, 09:12 PM
kambing also our word for goat =D

Sambal
10-18-2013, 01:46 AM
kambing also our word for goat =D


Hi Franz! Yeah, quite a few similar words between Tagalog and Malay.
Hope you don't have anyone affected by the earthquake.

franzb69
10-18-2013, 02:18 AM
Hi Franz! Yeah, quite a few similar words between Tagalog and Malay.
Hope you don't have anyone affected by the earthquake.

it's all good, thanks for your concern!

a good number of people died, but noone i knew. it's sad really, need to get the proper funds in our government to be funneled to where they're needed.

anyway, i miss having goat. it costs around $7-8 a kilo for goat, and you can't get them just anywhere. tasty stuff they are! nothing like grass fed animals.

shaneg
10-23-2013, 07:57 AM
I use x3 15kg-18kg (33-39lbs) goats a week, one of our biggest selling curries.
I buy them whole, I used to just break them down with a cleaver, but am now de boning the legs and neck, will start doing the rest soon when I've mastered what I'm doing now.

We slow braise ours in a coconut milk and chicken stock, with oyster sauce, lemongrass, ginger and kaffir lime leaf, a bit of palm sugar and fish sauce too.

You need to get young nanny goats that have been hung and bled properly..
Nanny's don't smell as bad.

Mrmnms
10-23-2013, 11:20 AM
[QUOTE=shaneg;251583]I use x3 15kg-18kg (33-39lbs) goats a week, one of our biggest selling curries.
I buy them whole, I used to just break them down with a cleaver, but am now de boning the legs and neck, will start doing the rest soon when I've mastered what I'm doing now.

We slow braise ours in a coconut milk and chicken stock, with oyster sauce, lemongrass, ginger and kaffir lime leaf, a bit of palm sugar and fish sauce too.

You need to get young nanny goats that have been hung and bled properly..

If you find a way to ship that here to the states, let me know

aaamax
10-24-2013, 01:24 PM
We slow braise ours in a coconut milk and chicken stock, with oyster sauce, lemongrass, ginger and kaffir lime leaf, a bit of palm sugar and fish sauce too.


Damn that sounds good. I'm trying that next time we do lamb... actually, full on mutton. I prefer the flavor of a four year old animal as long it was grass fed.

shaneg
10-25-2013, 02:35 AM
Damn that sounds good. I'm trying that next time we do lamb... actually, full on mutton. I prefer the flavor of a four year old animal as long it was grass fed.

Here's my stock recipe, scale it down as needed.

Chicken Stock.
5kg chicken frames
Handful of lemongrass scraps (10-15 green tops)
10-15 spring onion whites
10 star anise
3 cassia bark
20 litres water

Coconut stock.
20 litres chicken stock
3 litres coconut milk (Aroy D brand)
454g light palm sugar
500g ginger peel
Large handful of kaffir lime leaves
1 litre oyster sauce, (megachef brand)*
1cup fish sauce, (megachef brand)*
*Megachef products are gluten and msg free

I slow braise the goats for about 3 hours, its best to tip the stock out so you can take the goat out without destroying the meat and having nice big bits.
Let it cool/refrigerate and add to curry as required.

jbl
10-29-2013, 12:49 PM
A confit shoulder is the bomb. I do that regularly here, but the Halal butchers are the only guys that do it.

My girlfriend’s dad roasted a leg, it was like a pork/lamb hybrid. Pale and close textured, but full flavour.