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ptolemy
10-30-2013, 08:12 PM
I made the topic broad enough because some rice dishes, such as risotto already come as such (i'll explain).

I am going to use curry as an example. I am somewhat new to them and only had them 4-5 times at 3 different restaurants. They are small local places but one all had one thing is common: they all served rice and topped off with curry.

Here is my problem with it: even if I mix it well, it's still just cooked dry rice and curry on top. No amount of mixing would develop the flavor in rice. I do quick curries at home, with a paste but I cook rice 1/2 way through, drain it and let it cook last 5 minutes in a pan mixed with curry. Not only I can control how thick/thin I want it to be, but I find that rice picks up much of the flavor from curry and I can control salt/spiciness with greater success.

I do similar things with your stewed meats I freeze... Is this the typical way it's done in authentic restaurants or at home is curry on top/rice bottom looks better and provides nice contrast?

Earlier today, I was in a rush and I think it could use slightly more moisture. Flavor was spot own, hints of spicy in the back, hints of tamarind in the beginning and nice mellow flavor

http://i.imgur.com/MDiVfeC.jpg

panda
10-30-2013, 08:35 PM
If you want rice with more flavor take some of the curry and mix with chicken stock to cook the rice in.

sachem allison
10-30-2013, 09:54 PM
it is usually not mixed because, some people like there rice drier, some more wet and some like to control the amount of flavor in the rice. I have days were I like it all mixed together and other days when I like a little unflavored rice for a flavor break.

ohbewon
10-31-2013, 11:36 AM
it is usually not mixed because, some people like there rice drier, some more wet and some like to control the amount of flavor in the rice. I have days were I like it all mixed together and other days when I like a little unflavored rice for a flavor break.

Well played, Allison. Mixing the curry and rice is like dunking sushi in soy sauce. While a lot of people do it, its not really traditional. The rice is just a filler, and it dumbs down the tenacity of the curry for westerners. Go for the glory and just eat the curry with a spoonful of rice periodically.

erikz
10-31-2013, 01:16 PM
Well played, Allison. Mixing the curry and rice is like dunking sushi in soy sauce. While a lot of people do it, its not really traditional. The rice is just a filler, and it dumbs down the tenacity of the curry for westerners. Go for the glory and just eat the curry with a spoonful of rice periodically.
Well you can have Thai or Indonesian fried curry rice; these dishes traditionally have the curry sauce mixed with the rice and subsequently fried.

slowtyper
11-02-2013, 02:56 AM
Well you can have Thai or Indonesian fried curry rice; these dishes traditionally have the curry sauce mixed with the rice and subsequently fried.

Yeah but thats different from curry+rice. You don't eat fried rice + curry or fried rice + other dish.

I eat a lot of rice and usually wouldn't like it all mixed together.

Sambal
11-02-2013, 05:18 AM
Rice is complementary to curries in the Indian, Nepalese, Pakistani, Thai, Indonesian, Malay and Nyonya culinary traditions and are not usually served mixed in a mash. Just as one example, if you google 'Thali' you'd see a classic way of how Indian curries, rice and rotis are plated. One thing to know is that 'curry' is a generic term and in any meal there can be several 'curries' with distinct flavours and textures and you wouldn't want them all blended into one curry mash. Not even if you want a curry in a hurry!

Slypig5000
11-02-2013, 10:51 AM
What I really like is the contrast in flavor between the rice and the curry. Rice brings its own flavor and texture to the dish which I think make curries complete. By par cooking the rice and then finishing in the curry I feel you lose that distinction between the two components. And I'll make this assertion, good rice cooked well is a thing of bueaty and can make a good curry great. I'd suggest trying more curry and really pay attention to the flavor you pick up from the rice. When I first started eating Indian and Thai food, I thought thd rice was just filler, but now it's how I'll gauge a restaurant (great rice = great food from my anacdotal experience).

Zwiefel
11-02-2013, 10:55 AM
Rice is complementary to curries in the Indian, Nepalese, Pakistani, Thai, Indonesian, Malay and Nyonya culinary traditions and are not usually served mixed in a mash. Just as one example, if you google 'Thali' you'd see a classic way of how Indian curries, rice and rotis are plated. One thing to know is that 'curry' is a generic term and in any meal there can be several 'curries' with distinct flavours and textures and you wouldn't want them all blended into one curry mash. Not even if you want a curry in a hurry!

This.

In Indian cuisine, rice is much more prevalant in the south and eaten in HUGE quantities as compared to the curry. Rice is a thing all its own to them, not a filler. They also have a wide varieties of additives like pickles and spice powders they mix into the rice...as well as yogurt. They do this on a bite-by-bite basis to balance their palate as it is at that precise moment. I've never seen a home meal that only included 1 curry and plain rice...it's MUCH more interesting than that!

Sambal
11-02-2013, 11:49 AM
What I really like is the contrast in flavor between the rice and the curry. Rice brings its own flavor and texture to the dish which I think make curries complete. By par cooking the rice and then finishing in the curry I feel you lose that distinction between the two components. And I'll make this assertion, good rice cooked well is a thing of bueaty and can make a good curry great. I'd suggest trying more curry and really pay attention to the flavor you pick up from the rice. When I first started eating Indian and Thai food, I thought thd rice was just filler, but now it's how I'll gauge a restaurant (great rice = great food from my anacdotal experience).


Yes! Yes! and Yes!

And there are different kinds of rice as well. Basmati from India and Pakistan is long grain, 'dry' (if I may borrow a wine term) and is low GI. If you're diabetic 1 or 2 this is the rice that's better for you. Thai/Jasmine rice is mid-range GI and short grain sticky rice like sushi rice or glutinous rice is high GI. They're all different in how they should be cooked and how they taste and how they feel in your mouth.

Good rice cooked well is indeed wonderful. I like the way the Japanese have such a respect and appreciation for rice as a food for itself, by itself, as itself.