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JanusInTheGarden
06-11-2011, 11:20 AM
Does anyone else tend to find that their technique changes based on the cutting board they are using? For instance, the sanituff boards make me use a very different technique than wood because the sanituff has so much "grip" to it and the hardness is so different. On poly boards I have to change it even more because, well, I hate polyboards and I don't want my edge to come into contact with the board with too much force or frequency.

Cadillac J
06-11-2011, 11:56 AM
I'm not sure I would say my techniques in themselves vary that much between cutting surfaces, but I would definitely be more careful if I was forced to use a poly board.

bieniek
06-11-2011, 12:24 PM
As Cadillac said, the technique stays same, style changes.
But if you are so psycho about your edge and feel pain every time it contacts the board buy one Forschner, in this industry you never know whats gonna happen.

JanusInTheGarden
06-11-2011, 12:45 PM
I do have my beater knife but its such a P.O.S. Eventually a Forschner will be one of my wise investments.

Ordo
06-11-2011, 12:50 PM
I do agree. I bought such a hard wood board (Jatoba) that i had to change my cutting technique, not to touch it, or it will hurt my edges with the risk of chipping.
No more Jatoba. I'm getting back to my poly board.

Eamon Burke
06-11-2011, 02:35 PM
Very much so! I'm a bit sensitive to impulsive noise, so I don't like the banging sound of hammering a knife on a poly or bamboo cutting board--and neither do my knives. I like end grain wood the best of course. Butcher blocks are to cutting what vinyl is to music.

tk59
06-11-2011, 03:42 PM
Very much so! I'm a bit sensitive to impulsive noise, so I don't like the banging sound of hammering a knife on a poly or bamboo cutting board--and neither do my knives. I like end grain wood the best of course. Butcher blocks are to cutting what vinyl is to music.

+1 on the irritating sounds on poly and bamboo. I also don't do radial cut too much on my end grain because it gouges out little slivers of board, if I'm not careful. I do all up and down and side to side cuts on the board.

JohnnyChance
06-12-2011, 01:19 AM
I rock a lot more at work where the poly boards aren't dead flat and full of gouges. Helps prevent incomplete cuts.

I like endgrain boards and prefer them, but I really don't have tons of problems with poly boards when it comes to edge degradation. People make it sound like using a poly board is like using a section of sidewalk to cut on.

sashae
06-13-2011, 09:55 PM
I dunno, I visited my folks a couple of weeks ago (who only have poly boards) and managed to completely dull my Takeda gyuto after making freakin' cole slaw -- admittedly, fennel, radishes, red cabbage, green cabbage, and carrots... but still. Somewhat unfortunate.

JohnnyChance
06-14-2011, 12:30 AM
I can cut all week on poly boards at work and still have an edge that easily cuts ticket paper.

bieniek
06-14-2011, 11:41 AM
Maybe cause there are poly boards and Poly boards?

Potato42
06-14-2011, 12:02 PM
I agree with the sound issue, I can't say for sure one way or another about edge longevity as I rarely use a poly board, but I hate hearing the sound compared to my end grain boards. I've never used a sani-tuff but I can bet I would have to change technique a little bit. Every once and again I'm too heavy handed on the end grain board and the knife gets stuck just a tad in the board. Not enough to stay there, but enough to throw off a cutting rhythm if you're in one.

bieniek
06-14-2011, 12:05 PM
Every once and again I'm too heavy handed on the end grain board and the knife gets stuck just a tad in the board. Not enough to stay there, but enough to throw off a cutting rhythm if you're in one.

:Ooooh::eek2:

Lefty
06-15-2011, 01:25 AM
I agree with the sound issue, I can't say for sure one way or another about edge longevity as I rarely use a poly board, but I hate hearing the sound compared to my end grain boards. I've never used a sani-tuff but I can bet I would have to change technique a little bit. Every once and again I'm too heavy handed on the end grain board and the knife gets stuck just a tad in the board. Not enough to stay there, but enough to throw off a cutting rhythm if you're in one.

I admit, my 210 gyuto and my Carter funayuki have gotten pretty deep in my board once or twice!