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Mucho Bocho
11-22-2013, 04:03 PM
Does anybody have any experience with Trisol? Its a wheat flour that sysposed to amke foods that are deep fried very crispy and allos long holding time of friend foods while still remaining crisp? I've been wanting to try itand was in tme market for some more Micro Encapsulated Leavener and thought I pick up a littl bucket of trisol. Going to rock some onion rings and chicken thighs tonight. Anybody mess with this stuff? Sounds interesting.

Chef Niloc
11-22-2013, 10:31 PM
Don't quote me on this but I'm pretty sure it's not used much in the states, it's mostly used in countries that you can buy Wondra flower. I think it's one of the Ingredients in Wondra flour?
I wanted to do something nice for The chef that did my wedding in Rome (Chef Cristina Bowerman of Glass Hostaria ),you know chef to chef. so I asked her sous chef if there were anything that was hard to find that I could send over from the states that she might appreciate? Pink curing salt, mini chocolate chips, and Wondra flour came out of his mouth without even thinking. Cost me $70 to ship a $30/50lb bag of flour LOL.

Dusty
11-22-2013, 10:54 PM
Trisol is great stuff. I've added it to beer batter to make it hold very wet soft cheeses. I've used it for the most incredibly crunchy tempura. Have fun with it. It's best skill is that things coated with it don't go soggy for a good amount of time.

Andrew H
11-22-2013, 11:05 PM
I read that as Trizol and I was very, very confused: http://www.lifetechnologies.com/order/catalog/product/15596026

Dardeau
11-22-2013, 11:11 PM
You can make a beer batter, fry the onion rings, let them sit in the pass until cold, and microwave them back to temp and they're still crunchy. That stuff is freaky. I don't really like it, but it works well for high volume.

ecchef
11-22-2013, 11:30 PM
Does anyone have a CONUS POC for this product?

sachem allison
11-23-2013, 12:07 AM
colin, jetro sells wondra in 50lb bags

knyfeknerd
11-23-2013, 01:01 AM
Use it at work and love it. Not too much, but a little to the flour for the fried chix makes a big difference. Can def sit in the window for a couple 'o minutes no prob.

Mucho Bocho
11-23-2013, 08:58 AM
Thanks for the feedback. Sounds awesome. Not sure if all cooks have a a Achilles heel but I'm sad to say mine has been fried chicken. I've tried everything, shallow fry, deep fry, cooking at 325, 350 and 375. Tried sous vide the chick before battering, tried corn starch, House Autry batter, Cauputo Flour. I've made: Altons, Paula's, Thomas's and Ina's fried chicken recipe and same poor results. Fry in a lodge chicken fryer with a peanut oil mother. I've used beer, milk, buttermilk, vodka for wet. Brined in salt solution and hot sauce. I've used whole eggs and egg whites only...

There is always something that goes wrong:
1.) Too crunch, crust is hard like tree bark
2.) Batter doesn't adhere and flakes off
3.) Over cooked outside, inconsistent insides.

Very few cooking techniques intimidate me, but I've made hundred of fried chicken attempts and at the end of the day, I can still go to Bojangles for better fried bird. Any tips, tricks or advice for this pork chicken cooker would be welcomed.

Chef Niloc
11-23-2013, 12:03 PM
Thanks for the feedback. Sounds awesome. Not sure if all cooks have a a Achilles heel but I'm sad to say mine has been fried chicken. I've tried everything, shallow fry, deep fry, cooking at 325, 350 and 375. Tried sous vide the chick before battering, tried corn starch, House Autry batter, Cauputo Flour. I've made: Altons, Paula's, Thomas's and Ina's fried chicken recipe and same poor results. Fry in a lodge chicken fryer with a peanut oil mother. I've used beer, milk, buttermilk, vodka for wet. Brined in salt solution and hot sauce. I've used whole eggs and egg whites only...

There is always something that goes wrong:
1.) Too crunch, crust is hard like tree bark
2.) Batter doesn't adhere and flakes off
3.) Over cooked outside, inconsistent insides.

Very few cooking techniques intimidate me, but I've made hundred of fried chicken attempts and at the end of the day, I can still go to Bojangles for better fried bird. Any tips, tricks or advice for this pork chicken cooker would be welcomed.

Have you tried a pressure fryer? I have never used any if the ones made fir home use but the industrial ones work great.

Chef Niloc
11-23-2013, 12:21 PM
The pro-one we had was a Broaster but I was looking into getting the Fagor for my home
http://www.pro-selections.com/product.cfm/25931/

I brine in salted butter milk for a hr or 2, then let it dry out in the walkin over night, , dust with wondra flour then frying in peanut oil or Crisco.

pleue
11-23-2013, 01:48 PM
http://www.7x7.com/eat-drink/secret-recipe-hopscotchs-soy-buttermilk-fried-chicken

Mucho Bocho
11-23-2013, 08:56 PM
Chef Niloc darn you for sharing that link. I researched a Broaster but the cooking vessel went extinct in the 70's. I actually could use an 8 QT

ThEoRy
11-24-2013, 12:48 AM
Thanks for the feedback. Sounds awesome. Not sure if all cooks have a a Achilles heel but I'm sad to say mine has been fried chicken. I've tried everything, shallow fry, deep fry, cooking at 325, 350 and 375. Tried sous vide the chick before battering, tried corn starch, House Autry batter, Cauputo Flour. I've made: Altons, Paula's, Thomas's and Ina's fried chicken recipe and same poor results. Fry in a lodge chicken fryer with a peanut oil mother. I've used beer, milk, buttermilk, vodka for wet. Brined in salt solution and hot sauce. I've used whole eggs and egg whites only...

There is always something that goes wrong:
1.) Too crunch, crust is hard like tree bark
2.) Batter doesn't adhere and flakes off
3.) Over cooked outside, inconsistent insides.

Very few cooking techniques intimidate me, but I've made hundred of fried chicken attempts and at the end of the day, I can still go to Bojangles for better fried bird. Any tips, tricks or advice for this pork chicken cooker would be welcomed.


Break down 3.5# birds with the bone on. Marinate overnight in buttermilk with garlic powder, onion powder, thyme, paprika, salt, pepper and a tiny bit of cayenne. Now remove from Marinade and shake off excess then toss with seasoned flour (basically the same seasonings as earlier ) separate the white and dark meat and fry at 275 degrees. Drumsticks and thighs are about 8 minutes, breasts take about 12, wings are like 5. Now leave at the room temperature during service and turn fryer up to 300 and just put 1 each, breast, thigh, drum, wing down in the grease for 2 minutes. Serve with and buttermilk biscuit dressed with a red eye gravy. Perfect.

stopbarking
11-24-2013, 01:13 AM
Catered a wedding today with no place to cook on site and by using half potato starch and half AP I kept fried chicken crispy for about 2 hours in a cambro hotbox. Too bad I had to hold it for 3 before serving. Sometimes I hate catering. I'll give this trisol thing a shot next time.

Mucho Bocho
11-24-2013, 09:44 AM
Thanks Rick!. I'll give it a try, twice fried chicken huh? Nice



Break down 3.5# birds with the bone on. Marinate overnight in buttermilk with garlic powder, onion powder, thyme, paprika, salt, pepper and a tiny bit of cayenne. Now remove from Marinade and shake off excess then toss with seasoned flour (basically the same seasonings as earlier ) separate the white and dark meat and fry at 275 degrees. Drumsticks and thighs are about 8 minutes, breasts take about 12, wings are like 5. Now leave at the room temperature during service and turn fryer up to 300 and just put 1 each, breast, thigh, drum, wing down in the grease for 2 minutes. Serve with and buttermilk biscuit dressed with a red eye gravy. Perfect.

Bill13
11-26-2013, 05:43 PM
Reminds me of the better French fry recipes. We had a restaurant called Whitey's that had the best broasted chicken. Damn good onion rings too. I'm guessing they broasted them too. Man I miss that place.