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View Full Version : Masamoto vs Shigefusa Gyuto Profile Preferences



Marko Tsourkan
12-03-2013, 06:02 PM
Both are great profiles, selecting either comes to personal preferences.

So, which one do you prefer?

turbochef422
12-03-2013, 06:39 PM
I love them both and prefer the one that I have in my hand at the moment. I think masamoto might edge it out but I love the shig too. Don't know what your looking for in this question but I wouldn't change your profile at all

Nmko
12-03-2013, 06:43 PM
I love them both and prefer the one that I have in my hand at the moment. I think masamoto might edge it out but I love the shig too. Don't know what your looking for in this question but I wouldn't change your profile at all

+1 i feel exactly the same way...

stereo.pete
12-03-2013, 07:19 PM
I can tell you that the last two custom makers I've commissioned work from have been sent a profile stencil that is 100% Shigefusa. That being said I have never owned a Masamoto so my opinion is a moot point :spin chair:

Marko Tsourkan
12-03-2013, 07:40 PM
My profile is a hybrid of the two.

Of course, I am curios about preferences as I am trying to decide what profile to select for my heavy gyuto.

Most Japanese heavy gyutos on the market have Shigefusa-like profile with a slightly dropped heel.

DeepCSweede
12-03-2013, 08:27 PM
Shig all the way. I have been using the Masomoto extensively lately just trying to make myself like it and pulled out the Shig on a whim the other night. I forgot the joy that blade gives me. I just prefer a knife with a higher profile.

bkultra
12-03-2013, 08:49 PM
Profile I prefer my Masamoto. Geometry I prefer my shigefusa. You have seen both of the ones I own, and they are better for it.

Dusty
12-03-2013, 08:51 PM
I don't own a shig, but my yoshikane kasumi is not far off. I think that the taller profile and the higher nose suit a more hefty blade, whilst masamoto-esque profiles suit a svelte, nimble knife.

brainsausage
12-03-2013, 09:25 PM
Masamoto is great for fine work, but isn't the all arounder that the Shig is IMO. It's profile is more conducive to a wide variety of tasks. If we were talking grind- the Shig beats the living crap outta the Masamoto all day long.

Salty dog
12-03-2013, 09:28 PM
I agree, both great profiles, but as you probably know already that the shig's profile supports it's geometry well.

When I owned both I'd use the shig 240, which is a big knife, for prep work and the Masamoto for line work. It just happened to be better suited for my line.

bkultra
12-03-2013, 09:30 PM
I should state I agree that the Masamoto is not as well rounded of a profile (compared to Shigefusa). I am also a home cook and can deal with this fact easier then a pro.

brainsausage
12-03-2013, 09:40 PM
I agree, both great profiles, but as you probably know already that the shig's profile supports it's geometry well.

When I owned both I'd use the shig 240, which is a big knife, for prep work and the Masamoto for line work. It just happened to be better suited for my line.

+1. I owned your old 250 for a short time, and while I never had the opportunity to use it on the line(not a big call for that type of knife at a BBQ restaurant during service), it crossed my mind more than once how much I wished I'd had it back when I was running a 'finer dining' place.

Marko Tsourkan
12-03-2013, 10:17 PM
Now a different question.

Many Japanese knife profiles, including Shigefusa (but not Masamoto) have dropped heel, I guess, to facilitate rocking with a flatter profile knife compared to European chef knives. How many find this feature useful? For a long time, there seemed to be a consensus that a flat area at the heel (1/4-1/3 of the edge lengh) is a good thing for those who prefer to cut with a heel area.

Would a heavy gyuto benefit from having a dropped heel? I have had this conversation with a a couple of pros and both thought it was useful feature, as it facilitates a cutting motion, making the weight of the knife to do more work.

brainsausage
12-03-2013, 10:33 PM
Yes. I highly prefer a dropped heel. Full heel feels very clunky to me and unnatural. But only the heel itself, say a matter of mm's. That flat spot starting early is nice, but not if it's too flat for too long.

chinacats
12-03-2013, 11:23 PM
Yes. I highly prefer a dropped heel. Full heel feels very clunky to me and unnatural. But only the heel itself, say a matter of mm's. That flat spot starting early is nice, but not if it's too flat for too long.

+1

Having both Shig and KS at the moment I can honestly say, the only thing that I prefer the Masamoto for is push cutting. Overall, I consider the Shig the more useful knife for everything else. And has been stated numerous times--the geometry of the Shig is totally badass.

dmccurtis
12-04-2013, 01:25 AM
What are we defining as a dropped heel?

erikz
12-04-2013, 05:41 AM
Shigefusa. I can't seem to stop visiting Maxims site and drool over them...

Marko Tsourkan
12-04-2013, 10:35 AM
Yes. I highly prefer a dropped heel. Full heel feels very clunky to me and unnatural. But only the heel itself, say a matter of mm's. That flat spot starting early is nice, but not if it's too flat for too long.

thanks, that is what I was looking for. Will make some heavy chef's with a dropped heel.

crunchy
12-26-2013, 10:48 PM
The shige profile is perfect in every way

bahamaroot
12-28-2013, 04:22 PM
Simple - KS

Salty dog
12-29-2013, 12:17 AM
I'm not exactly sure of what "dropped heel" is either. If it is what I think it is, a dropped heel is a helluva lot easier on the board.

Marko Tsourkan
12-29-2013, 08:44 PM
A dropped heel is a slight rounding of the heel in the last 2 inch or so. Maybe 1.5mm or so difference in height. It essentially takes clunking out of the equation.

M

daddy yo yo
01-03-2014, 06:51 AM
FWIW, I've sold my KS and bought a Shig instead. For me, that was the best thing I could have done. My vote goes to Shigefusa!