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Jim
12-05-2013, 03:52 PM
I plan on curing a couple hams for the holidays ahead- besides the basic cure does anyone have some twists and turns to turn the flavors up a little?

I will be smoking them after the cure to eat, not store. Whatcha Got?

knyfeknerd
12-05-2013, 04:04 PM
It all depends on what flavor you're going for. I've had success in the past with (before putting the cure on) doing all types of spice rubs. My favorite is a blackening spice rub, heavily coating the meat-then apply your cure. I've done this with all kinds of rubs and all kinds of proteins-from Lox to Hams to Duck.
Pastrami is a good one too!

bkultra
12-05-2013, 04:08 PM
I tried using dizzy pigs recipe for curing/smoking a ham with good results.

http://dizzypigbbq.com/portfolio/dizzy-pig-home-cured-ham/

Mucho Bocho
12-05-2013, 04:59 PM
Jim, If your going to cure anything definately use some sodium erythrobate, that and Mortons quick tender are a really quick professional powerful full-cure ingredients.

http://www.malabarsuperspice.com/ref_sodiumeryth.htm

For recipies. Nobody beats Len Poli

http://lpoli.50webs.com/Sausage%20recipes.htm

seattle_lee
12-06-2013, 12:47 AM
I'm trying my hand at speck. Cured it with juniper, fennel, pepper, garlic, and bay. Put it up to hang on Sunday. Now I need to figure out the smoking regimen.

Jim
12-06-2013, 11:28 AM
Jim, If your going to cure anything definately use some sodium erythrobate, that and Mortons quick tender are a really quick professional powerful full-cure ingredients.

http://www.malabarsuperspice.com/ref_sodiumeryth.htm

For recipies. Nobody beats Len Poli

http://lpoli.50webs.com/Sausage recipes.htm

Thanks Dennis, thats a tough website to maneuver through! I was quite surprised at the short length of time they call for the curing. I have some reading to do yet.


I tried using dizzy pigs recipe for curing/smoking a ham with good results.

http://dizzypigbbq.com/portfolio/dizzy-pig-home-cured-ham/
That seems pretty straightforward, thanks

Mucho Bocho
12-06-2013, 12:21 PM
Jim, I hear ya but I'll tell you that the forumulations are bang on. I've made hundereds of pounds from their recipes and have never had something too salty or under seasoned. I like that the recipes are in weight not volume measurements too.

Another thing I started doing it to use distilled water as opposed to tap water in all brines, solutions or pickles. Even the slighest bit of chlorine in your meat can lead to unwanted flavors and reactions.

Good luck. Please show your work!

Chuckles
12-06-2013, 12:55 PM
I highly recommend this injector for ensuring full saturation of the brine especially if you are using bone in hams.

http://www.butcher-packer.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=2_45_231&products_id=25

20751

I saw a couple recipes that used tea in the brine that looked interesting but I can't remember who's recipes they were. Maybe Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall?

keithsaltydog
12-07-2013, 03:27 AM
Do you use wood chips?I know old smoke houses on farms in the South used diff. woods like Hickory,Pecan,Apple.

Mucho Bocho
12-07-2013, 10:26 AM
Keith, that depends on where in the South you're talking about. North Carolina supposed to be knows for classic "Southern BBQ," but in my 12 years of living here, I've been largely disappointed. The pork is almost never smoked, and if they do do whole hog, they cook it in a large wheeled vehicle called a "Pig Cooker." Which is almost always cooks by gas only.

I've been to about 23 BBQ joints, including Wilburs. Most of the BBQ is either meh or down right terrible. Usually swimming in sauce that masks the pork flavor, sometime they even chop it. I'll never understand why people would want their BBQ to look like tuna fish.

Also, I've found other bring pumps more effective that that Weston unit Chuckles mentioned above (no offense Chuck, I have that one too)

http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Bar-B-Q-40100X-Seasoning-Marinade/dp/B0011YOY6A/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1386426080&sr=8-18&keywords=meat+injector

What I like about this model is that it has a sharp tip and the pickle is released from the through holes on the side of the needle, not the tip. The Weston ones does this too but I found the long, rounded needle very clumsy when trying to evenly distribute the pickle.

Chuckles
12-07-2013, 10:45 AM
Certainly not offended by your brine pump. :clown:

The tool used for this is not fancy and I have found that metal or plastic they never last very long. The point is to get the brine to the bone and to the very center of the ham as fast as possible so the cure can start its magic before the meat can begin to turn on you. Unless you have followed the pig from slaughter to the brine bucket it is near impossible to know the age of the meat. Probably best to error on the side of caution.

Good luck!

bkultra
12-07-2013, 11:30 AM
I use this one hard and often and it has stood up very well. They even have different needle options

http://img51.imageshack.us/img51/4485/q6rp.jpg

http://spitjack.com/product/MAGNUM.html

keithsaltydog
12-07-2013, 12:21 PM
That brine pump looks cool.Like to know how your Ham turns out.

I've been to parties in Hawaii where whole pig cooked on a spit.Also Imu cooking of pig,a pit in the ground wt. kindling wood & hot rocks.It is alot of work.I have only watched it done.The pig is actually steamed in the ground.