PDA

View Full Version : Optimum time to age meat?



rahimlee54
06-14-2011, 10:05 PM
I talked with a local butcher and he said he would dry age some pretty nice angus choice ribeye for me. I was wondering if there was an opinion on the amount of time to age beef, I have seen 21 day old a few times, but this guy will do whatever I want so I was wondering what would be best.

Thanks
Jared

PierreRodrigue
06-14-2011, 10:57 PM
I'm sure the experts will chime in, but a 21 day aging is great! Some butchers who know their stuff, and have the appropriate facilities, will do a 28 day aging. Wow! What texture and flavor! I've had some beef done 28 days, it looses a fair bit of weight due to moisture loss, but it is a treat!

azmark
06-15-2011, 12:19 PM
I already buy my meat aged, is there any difference between one that is already aged than one you asked to be aged for you?

mhlee
06-15-2011, 12:55 PM
I already buy my meat aged, is there any difference between one that is already aged than one you asked to be aged for you?

Absolutely. If you ask for a piece of meat to be aged for you, you can (1) choose the specific cut to be aged (usually only whole parts can be aged because of the significant amount of moisture loss and amount of meat that has to be trimmed after aging), (2) the manner in which a piece of meat is aged (wet aged, wet aged and dry aged, or dry aged only), and (3) the length of time a piece of meat is aged.

I recall reading in a number of articles that 21 to 28 is generally considered best, with meat aged over 28 having a decidedly funkiness about it. However, if I also recall correctly, Jeffrey Steingarten actually preferred his meat aged much longer. Most places will not age meat over 21 days simply because they do not have space or adequate facilities to age meat longer than that. And 21 days is the exception, not the rule.

I've certainly not done a side by side comparison, but the steaks that I've had that were marketed as dry-aged (vs. wet aged) at least 28 days were the best.

azmark
06-15-2011, 10:38 PM
Absolutely. If you ask for a piece of meat to be aged for you, you can (1) choose the specific cut to be aged (usually only whole parts can be aged because of the significant amount of moisture loss and amount of meat that has to be trimmed after aging), (2) the manner in which a piece of meat is aged (wet aged, wet aged and dry aged, or dry aged only), and (3) the length of time a piece of meat is aged.

I recall reading in a number of articles that 21 to 28 is generally considered best, with meat aged over 28 having a decidedly funkiness about it. However, if I also recall correctly, Jeffrey Steingarten actually preferred his meat aged much longer. Most places will not age meat over 21 days simply because they do not have space or adequate facilities to age meat longer than that. And 21 days is the exception, not the rule.

I've certainly not done a side by side comparison, but the steaks that I've had that were marketed as dry-aged (vs. wet aged) at least 28 days were the best.

hmmm.......looks like I need to have a chat with my butcher about my options. Very informative, thank you.

Jay
06-15-2011, 11:36 PM
In Arizona, they specialize in "dry heat" aging.

azmark
06-17-2011, 12:31 AM
In Arizona, they specialize in "dry heat" aging.

Then we throw it on the hood of our cars and sear it. 107 today.......bearable still

ThEoRy
06-17-2011, 12:58 AM
21-28 days

BraisedorStewed
06-18-2011, 03:57 PM
50 days. Once you've done it nothing else measures up. It has character like an exquisite red wine.

Kentucky Jeff
06-29-2011, 01:21 PM
Dry aging meat requires exquisite temp and humidity control. Not many places have that capability. The longer you age the meat the more important the constant temp and humidity becomes. Not all meat responds well to dry aging and ideally the fat content needs to be higher than your standard cut at the supermarket. I've dry aged venison for 3 weeks in a friend's walk-in cooler with success. Be aware that you will also loose product to trimming as the aged meat will have a layer of mold that needs trimming before it can be used.

Kentucky Jeff
06-29-2011, 01:22 PM
In Arizona, they specialize in "dry heat" aging.

They call that stuff jerky!