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View Full Version : Need a good French toast recipe



Pachowder
12-22-2013, 11:00 PM
I know, French toast, how hard can it be? I went to the hash house in Vegas and they had the most unreal French toast I have ever had. Does anyone have a good recipe?

tripleq
12-22-2013, 11:50 PM
I've done a lot of experimenting and I find that the biggest thing that affects French toast is the bread. I've gotten interesting results with challah, raisin, baguette and even banana bread and brioche. I like adding some vanilla to the egg mix. Some warm syrup with a little grand mariner whisked in isn't bad either!

marc4pt0
12-22-2013, 11:56 PM
Lots of recipes but I believe one of the most important steps is the cooking. First, what ever recipe you decide to go with, make sure you use a thicker style bread, and let it soak up some of the mix.
Next, find the right temp for your cooking surface, not too hot and of course not too cold. Use a neutral oil like grapeseed and sear, I mean Sear both sides of the bread. Get that nice golden brown on there. Then, with the insides of the bread still "raw" and mushy, pop them into your oven and bake at 375 convection until the middles begin to souffle up nicely. This means the custard/royale has set lightly.
Pull slice and enjoy. Outsides golden crispy with the center soft and delicate.

Rough recipe I like to use:
5 whole eggs beaten
Mix in a pinch of salt and one twist of a pepper mill
Mix in 2tsp ground cinnamon, 1/4 cup sugar (more to taste if desired), zest of one orange, 1tbsp+1tsp of pure vanilla extract
(This is optional but during fall and winter I also add a couple tbsp of Apple cider reduction)
After mixing all this well and even, whisk in 4 cups milk. Mix hard then taste. Adjust with more milk or more sugar our whatever you like. Soak your bread and go to town. And whatever you do, don't use anything less than pure maple syrup.

boomchakabowwow
12-23-2013, 12:42 AM
Lots of recipes but I believe one of the most important steps is the cooking. First, what ever recipe you decide to go with, make sure you use a thicker style bread, and let it soak up some of the mix.
Next, find the right temp for your cooking surface, not too hot and of course not too cold. Use a neutral oil like grapeseed and sear, I mean Sear both sides of the bread. Get that nice golden brown on there. Then, with the insides of the bread still "raw" and mushy, pop them into your oven and bake at 375 convection until the middles begin to souffle up nicely. This means the custard/royale has set lightly.
Pull slice and enjoy. Outsides golden crispy with the center soft and delicate.

Rough recipe I like to use:
5 whole eggs beaten
Mix in a pinch of salt and one twist of a pepper mill
Mix in 2tsp ground cinnamon, 1/4 cup sugar (more to taste if desired), zest of one orange, 1tbsp+1tsp of pure vanilla extract
(This is optional but during fall and winter I also add a couple tbsp of Apple cider reduction)
After mixing all this well and even, whisk in 4 cups milk. Mix hard then taste. Adjust with more milk or more sugar our whatever you like. Soak your bread and go to town. And whatever you do, don't use anything less than pure maple syrup.

No milk?

I just do a basic custard. Eggs plus some half n half. Cinnamon, pinch of salt, vanilla and some almond extract. I like a hearty bread like a soft fresh loaf.

The Edge
12-23-2013, 12:45 AM
This is making me hungry... Especially since I'm having a nice Riesling, which I think would go perfect with it :biggrin:

JHunter
12-23-2013, 12:54 AM
Stuffed with mascarpone.

rahimlee54
12-23-2013, 04:12 AM
I make brioche and it is awesome. We like to soak overnight in custard for a silky interior all the way through. I also add cinnamon directly to the soaked bread so it gets on each piece evenly. I also like it of cinnamon so this helps with that too.

Dusty
12-23-2013, 05:19 AM
I like to use more of a royale batter. 10 eggs, 200ml cream, 50g muscavado sugar, a scraped vanilla bean, a touch of nutmeg, salt and booze. For booze, I like to use oloroso sherry or Marsala, depending in the garnish. This is quite rich.

Marc's cookery method is sound. Good Christmas breakfast really.

marc4pt0
12-23-2013, 05:58 AM
No milk?

I just do a basic custard. Eggs plus some half n half. Cinnamon, pinch of salt, vanilla and some almond extract. I like a hearty bread like a soft fresh loaf.

Third line from the bottom- 4 cups of that good stuff to be exact which I'm not sure why I didn't just say 1 quart...

Dardeau
12-23-2013, 10:26 AM
I find the key to be really staleing the bread. I make brioche and let it sit for two days or so. Almost to breadcrumb point so all the h2o is out and it is ready to soak in a maximum amount of custard. And Marc's recipe is dead on for what I do, except I use pure cane syrup mixed with karo for the texture. I've been mixing this for years and then just realized that Steen's makes it. It was sitting right next to the syrup cans.

NO ChoP!
12-23-2013, 12:24 PM
I like to use yolks, cream, orange zest, Grand Marnier and vanilla bean. Also, I cook in clarified butter. Mmmm, very healthy!

tk59
12-23-2013, 12:33 PM
I use whole eggs, vanilla, cinnamon, and some maple syrup. On the bread, I avoid anything crumbly. I always pre-toast the bread before dipping. How much I let it soak, depends on personal preference and the constitution of the bread. At the Asian market, they have this bread that has a sweet taro paste folded into it. The kids LOVE... LOVE... it when I use that stuff. Actually, everyone loves it, come to think of it. Always use butter... mmm....

Dusty
12-23-2013, 12:53 PM
This thread inspired me to have a monte Christo for late night dinner last night.

apicius9
12-23-2013, 03:09 PM
Ok, this may be a really stupid question, but could I also cook the bread and custard sous vide a few days in advance, and then just get them golden brown and warmed through in a pan when I need them?

Stefan

Dusty
12-23-2013, 05:24 PM
I see no reason why not, though it would be hard not to squish the bread too much and squeeze out the custard.

Pachowder
12-23-2013, 07:07 PM
Thanks all. Anyone bake it or just griddle them? I am thinking of letting the brioche soak overnight and throw I the oven to bake while the family opens gifts. With a 3 year old, we better get right to unwrapping

Von blewitt
12-23-2013, 07:33 PM
I used to use leftover sourdough, and blend it with an Anglaise mix ( + cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger), pass through a Tamis, pour it into a loaf tin, Vac the tin and cook it sous vide for a couple of hours @82 degrees from memory but I'd have to check.

We'd cut it into tick slices, then caramelise it in foaming butter, it didnt have the texture of classic French toast, but it was pretty tasty.

Mrmnms
12-23-2013, 09:54 PM
Thanks all. Anyone bake it or just griddle them? I am thinking of letting the brioche soak overnight and throw I the oven to bake while the family opens gifts. With a 3 year old, we better get right to unwrapping

My best friend and his mom both have bed and breakfasts. Their most requested breakfast is their baked french toast ( written up in Bon Appetite tears ago ). They set it up the night before and bake it in am just like you're thinking.

panda
12-23-2013, 10:09 PM
brioche
eggs, cream, vanilla, cinnamon+nutmeg, pinch of salt, whisk it well, let it sit overnight
whisk again before dipping
cook it in cast iron with butter and bacon grease

Pachowder
12-23-2013, 10:31 PM
My best friend and his mom both have bed and breakfasts. Their most requested breakfast is their baked french toast ( written up in Bon Appetite tears ago ). They set it up the night before and bake it in am just like you're thinking.

Good to hear thanks!

Mrmnms...bacon and butter grease...yum!

don
12-23-2013, 11:16 PM
My favorite french toast is this pain perdue recipe (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/pain-perdu-recipe6/index.html). Though I cook with 2" thick country loaf and my custard mix is a more standard 1/2 cup of cream : 1 egg ratio.

http://www.carblicious.com/images/131028_painperdu_1_800.jpg

boomchakabowwow
12-25-2013, 07:11 PM
Third line from the bottom- 4 cups of that good stuff to be exact which I'm not sure why I didn't just say 1 quart...

slapping my forehead and saying "duh!" now. sorry bud.

boomchakabowwow
12-25-2013, 07:12 PM
this thread sucks..

i am getting fat just reading the deliciousness..

gah!

Mrmnms
12-25-2013, 07:39 PM
Pachowder pointed me in the right direction. Ended up baking a breakfast strata. Self serve.

Chef Niloc
12-26-2013, 12:09 AM
Didn't read the whole thread so I'm sorry uf someone already posted this .

My two favorite things to do with french toast is
1) change up the spice...as in use something more then just cinnamon. Some successful things I have used are;
Cinnamon, vanilla, coriander, dry ginger and allspice.
2) garam masala
3) cinnamon, chili powder and clove
4) Chinese 5 spice

The 2nd thing I like to do us "stuff" the life if bread before slicing and cooking. I use a pastry bag too fill the loaf and I have used many different. "Fillings" But some good ones are
Cream cheese ..mix with fruit like apples or berries is good to.
mascarpone cheese
Chocolate
Ice cream
Smokes salmon
meringue, coconut is a good one, add coco into the egg mix before cooking.

Note freezing after stuffing us usually needed. I have done "personal" sized ones too, works great... Martens potato hotdog rolls come mind.

Which brings me to the bread. brioche & jaula are great but I love to use potato bread or old stale vanilla (or other) sheet (or pound ) cake.