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matthewmcmillin1
01-14-2014, 01:16 AM
Hey guys, I'm trying to get into rolling out my own pasta by hand (no sheeter), and I'm wondering what everyone's opinions on the best kind of rolling pins to get as far as length and material. I know the pros use very long pins, but might I ask, 'How long is too long?!'. Please include links if you have knowledge.

scotchef38
01-14-2014, 01:51 AM
Broom stick handle is a good and cheap option.Size depends on how much room you have-long is good.

bkultra
01-14-2014, 11:38 AM
I make my own pasta every week. The traditional lenght would be approx. 36 to 40 in length. But finding one that does not bow at that lenght can be tougher then you think. You can start out using a French rolling pin and move up to the larger style once you get the feel for it.

Here is a nice blog about the topic

http://www.ilbelcentro.com/2013/02/17/pasta-101/

JHunter
01-14-2014, 11:42 AM
I have a great 22" French pin made for me love it

Erilyn75
01-15-2014, 05:10 AM
I was ordering a spoon and saw this. He makes beautiful fully finished products. If it's not long enough or you want it in a different wood just shoot him a message.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/129991494/wooden-rolling-pin-of-black-cherry-wood?ref=shop_home_active_1

rahimlee54
01-15-2014, 06:53 AM
Just curious, why would you want to use a rolling pin instead of a sheeter? That sounds like making it harder on yourself. I have a pasta rolling machine and it is great, not that there is anything wrong with making it by hand.

bkultra
01-15-2014, 01:02 PM
Just curious, why would you want to use a rolling pin instead of a sheeter? That sounds like making it harder on yourself. I have a pasta rolling machine and it is great, not that there is anything wrong with making it by hand.

Many believe the sheeter changes the texture of the pasta (to smooth and glass like). Other just like to keep the tradition alive.

matthewmcmillin1
01-16-2014, 02:39 AM
Just as bkultra said, I'm trying to experiment with different texture. It's what turns a good restaurant into a great one. You can apply the same principle of the question "why don't you make a frozen pizza?" I e why don't you just make things easier. As chefs, we're always trying to take our dishes as close to 'from scratch' as possible. Sure the pasta from the sheeter will be good, but it won't be by your own hand.

jamaster14
02-13-2014, 12:33 PM
Hey guys, I'm trying to get into rolling out my own pasta by hand (no sheeter), and I'm wondering what everyone's opinions on the best kind of rolling pins to get as far as length and material. I know the pros use very long pins, but might I ask, 'How long is too long?!'. Please include links if you have knowledge.

the length isnt super important, as long as its long enough to be a few inches wider then the final width of your pasta dough. I like something thin and flat. i have a custom on thats maybe the thickness of a silver dollar. the guy who said a broomstick sized is about what id go with, maybe a bit thicker. i like the thinner ones, using my own strength to appy the pressure and just seem to have a better feel for it. but it not being warped is key, you really need it to roll evenly.

jamaster14
02-13-2014, 12:34 PM
Just as bkultra said, I'm trying to experiment with different texture. It's what turns a good restaurant into a great one. You can apply the same principle of the question "why don't you make a frozen pizza?" I e why don't you just make things easier. As chefs, we're always trying to take our dishes as close to 'from scratch' as possible. Sure the pasta from the sheeter will be good, but it won't be by your own hand.

i think you will see at least a modest difference. i still use a roller for when i dont have the time/energy but it does tend to take away some of the texture.

AndyS
02-26-2014, 09:50 AM
Can't go wrong with a good French pin. Anything in the 22" region and you are laughing!