PDA

View Full Version : What size saucepan can't you live without?



gavination
01-29-2014, 06:32 PM
Hey all,

So I'm looking at a new saucepan. What size can y'all not live without or use the most often? I'm torn between 1 qt and 3 qt. I gotta piece it together for the time being and I'm having a hard time choosing! Gotta save money for a knife after all... :lol2:

Thanks!

Gavin.

rahimlee54
01-29-2014, 07:14 PM
How many people? I use my 3 qt 3:1 at the very least over my smaller one. However, they are both good to have around. I cook for 2 usually and I make all my weekday lunches on the weekend so the 3 qt would pull that duty here.

gavination
01-29-2014, 07:19 PM
Oops forgot. Just for home cooking. Two to six people usually.

I feel the same way. Three quart basically seems indispensable. I just want to make sure I'm not missing anything that I should consider. :D

bkultra
01-29-2014, 08:16 PM
Something in the range of 3qt-4qt would be the most useful for two to six people. I happen to own both a 3.2qt and 1.6qt saucepan (also a 2.6qt Sauteuse, but that is a different story). Between the two I use the 3.2qt more often,but both are very much needed IMO. Remember it's easier to use a large pan to do a small job than using a small pan for a large job.

Edit: your choice should also be based on what you already own. Are you looking to fill in holes with you equipment or replace an existing piece?

gavination
01-30-2014, 09:48 AM
Something in the range of 3qt-4qt would be the most useful for two to six people. I happen to own both a 3.2qt and 1.6qt saucepan (also a 2.6qt Sauteuse, but that is a different story). Between the two I use the 3.2qt more often,but both are very much needed IMO. Remember it's easier to use a large pan to do a small job than using a small pan for a large job.

Edit: your choice should also be based on what you already own. Are you looking to fill in holes with you equipment or replace an existing piece?

I'm looking to replace my 3-qt with a much nicer one, but don't have a 1-qt. I've just always used my 2-qt for that. Debating how much I need a 1-qt compared to getting a very nice 3-qt.

My gut told me 3.2!

bkultra
01-30-2014, 10:26 AM
Keep in mind for what most people use a saucepan for (reheating) there is no real reason to spend $$$ on one. I bought Demeyere Atlantis so I did not follow my own advice. But you might want to keep using your 3qt pan or replace it with a lower cost pan. It makes more sense to spend more money on a smaller saucepan (or sauteuse/saucier) assuming you would use it to make delicate sauces.

You are best to focus your budget on pieces that will benefit from the higher cost pieces (fry pans, sauté pans, sauce making pans, etc). Like I said your standard saucepan just doesn't have high demands placed on it that justify the higher cost pieces.

Chef Andy
01-30-2014, 10:42 AM
At work I couldn't live without my 3 litre saucepan. It gets used almost constantly.

gavination
01-30-2014, 11:01 AM
Yea, 3L/3.2-qt get so much use. Hence me wanting to get a nice one.

Bk, funny. I'm actually extremely tempted to get the Atlantis one myself! Especially because their in store stock is on sale right now at SLT!

What are your thoughts on a sauté pan? Stainless? Copper? I was eyeing the Proline 12.6" sauté as well. Heavy brute that it is. Too much beast for home use?

Mucho Bocho
01-30-2014, 11:43 AM
There are a lot of great pans on the market. I have a plethora of all clad, falk, debyuer... However, my tri-ply tramontina from Wally World still get the most use. And for the price, tryllu unbeatable

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-10-Piece-Tri-Ply-Clad-Cookware-Set-Stainless-Steel/22984414

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-3-Qt-Tri-Ply-Clad-Sauce-Pan-with-Lid-Stainless-Steel/23000704

bkultra
01-30-2014, 12:10 PM
What are your thoughts on a sauté pan? Stainless? Copper? I was eyeing the Proline 12.6" sauté as well. Heavy brute that it is. Too much beast for home use?

I don't use copper because my cooktop is induction and there is only one line of copper that works on standard induction (de Buyer), but if you got the proper thickness (2.5mm+) and a gas cooktop it work make an excellent choice. The 12.6" (32cm) by Demeyere is a fry pan not a sauté. The sauté is 11" (28cm) and I own this very one.

Keep in mind a 11" sauté has more flat cooking space than a 12.6" fry pan. I myself prefer a 11" fry pan and find the 12.6" a little to large for most of my needs.

You should always try and match the bottom diameter of your pots/pans to the size of your hob. 11" sauté pan is the max for most home cooktops.

El Pescador
01-30-2014, 01:22 PM
There are a lot of great pans on the market. I have a plethora of all clad, falk, debyuer... However, my tri-ply tramontina from Wally World still get the most use. And for the price, tryllu unbeatable

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-10-Piece-Tri-Ply-Clad-Cookware-Set-Stainless-Steel/22984414

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-3-Qt-Tri-Ply-Clad-Sauce-Pan-with-Lid-Stainless-Steel/23000704


Use a bunch of that stuff...you're right great pans for the price!

rahimlee54
01-30-2014, 04:41 PM
There are a lot of great pans on the market. I have a plethora of all clad, falk, debyuer... However, my tri-ply tramontina from Wally World still get the most use. And for the price, tryllu unbeatable

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-10-Piece-Tri-Ply-Clad-Cookware-Set-Stainless-Steel/22984414

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-3-Qt-Tri-Ply-Clad-Sauce-Pan-with-Lid-Stainless-Steel/23000704

I have a set of these as well, they are nice and the price is right.

gavination
01-30-2014, 05:36 PM
I don't use copper because my cooktop is induction and there is only one line of copper that works on standard induction (de Buyer), but if you got the proper thickness (2.5mm+) and a gas cooktop it work make an excellent choice. The 12.6" (32cm) by Demeyere is a fry pan not a sauté. The sauté is 11" (28cm) and I own this very one.

Keep in mind a 11" sauté has more flat cooking space than a 12.6" fry pan. I myself prefer a 11" fry pan and find the 12.6" a little to large for most of my needs.

You should always try and match the bottom diameter of your pots/pans to the size of your hob. 11" sauté pan is the max for most home cooktops.

Sorry, I was in a hurry and mistyped! I have the 11" sauté as well. Amazing! Heavy bugged, but I've had it for ten years and loved every minute. I'm debating the 12.6" skillet. I feel like for frying things, the sauté just doesn't do it quite as well. Is a cast iron skillet a substitute for a stainless skillet?

I hadn't considered burner size. Sadly, I don't think they have any 11" skillets left. Does it make sense to double up on that size though? 11" skillet if I already have an 11" sauté? Granted they're for different things technically...

I'm shying away from a 10" skillet as well because I feel like it just isn't enough real estate.

Thanks bk!

I'll have to check out the tramontina saucepans as well. Hopefully there's another vendor though. I can't do Wally World. :)

bkultra
01-30-2014, 07:08 PM
Is a cast iron skillet a substitute for a stainless skillet?

Cast iron is a great choice for a skillet. I use cast iron or carbon steel pans when I want to sear meats. These are the best materials for this purpose. Both are fairly inexpensive and everyone should have at least one. But they do not replace a SS fry pan... They are reactive to acidic foods and not very good if you want to deglaze the pan. Different horses for courses

Cast iron look into lodge or if your willing to track down Griswold or Wangner
Carbon steel look into de Buyer, Spring USA, or Turk if you feel like tracking one down



I hadn't considered burner size. Sadly, I don't think they have any 11" skillets left. Does it make sense to double up on that size though? 11" skillet if I already have an 11" sauté? Granted they're for different things technically...


Not only different uses but different cooking sizes... The top opening is 11" on both but because the sauté pan has straight walls it has a true 11" bottom diameter. The 11" fry pan has a 8.7" bottom diameter. You cook for more people so you might want the 12.6" fry pan but you would still need a smaller pan to go with it IMO.

You can get the 11" fry pan the cheapest at bed bath and beyond right now ($199-20%=159+ tax and shipping) normally $270
http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/demeyere-proline-stainless-steel-fry-pans/206745?Keyword=Demeyere



I'll have to check out the tramontina saucepans as well. Hopefully there's another vendor though. I can't do Wally World. :)

They offer a great bang for the buck. They have different quality lines so make sure you compare apples to apples. 125west offers both Demeyere and the higher end line of Tramontina (if you email them they will price match and give a discount if you ask, or at least did for me)

http://www.125west.com/c-22-cookware.aspx

EdipisReks
01-30-2014, 09:04 PM
I really love my Viking 3.5 QT "reduction sauce pan" but I don't think it's made anymore. It's a pan I use several times a week.

bkultra
01-30-2014, 09:16 PM
I really love my Viking 3.5 QT "reduction sauce pan" but I don't think it's made anymore. It's a pan I use several times a week.

It's made by Demeyere and is no longer being made (your are correct). You can still buy the 2qt one here

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/viking-v7/stainless-steel-reduction-saucepan-p15705

EdipisReks
01-30-2014, 09:19 PM
It's made by Demeyere and is no longer being made (your are correct). You can still buy the 2qt one here

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/viking-v7/stainless-steel-reduction-saucepan-p15705

yes, Viking cookware being made by Demeyere is what made me look at them in the first place. I got mine for $100, last year, which was a pretty nice price!

Erilyn75
01-30-2014, 10:34 PM
I use my 3qt the most often then the 4qt

Mrmnms
01-30-2014, 11:02 PM
My 2.75 quart Bourgeat Evasee was my everyday pan til it mysteriously disappeared during re modeling. My 3 qt All Clad saucier get used almost every day.

gavination
01-31-2014, 09:54 AM
Oh man. So many options! I wish I could afford one of the Bourgeat sauciers hah!

I hadn't really thought about a saucier being so versatile. The more I think about it, the better it sounds! I may have to get one instead of a saucepot. :lol:

Thanks for all the awesome suggestions!

hardline_42
01-31-2014, 10:35 AM
I second the recommendation for a sauteuse evasee over a traditional, straight-sided sauce pan. It's much more versatile, has a smaller footprint on the stove and works for sauteeing and sauces (and pretty much everything else). Unless you require clad because of induction or ease of maintenance, I'd recommend getting something in 3mm thick, tin-lined copper from eBay. While anything from the Demeyere Atlantis line is excellent as far as clad cookware goes, the performance of thick copper is unmatched.

bkultra
01-31-2014, 03:06 PM
I'd recommend getting something in 3mm thick, tin-lined copper from eBay.

I do agree that thick vintage copper (3mm+) is excellent on a gas range. I do not agree that tin lined is the correct choice for most home users. First one has to be very experienced to make sure they do not damage it. Tin melts at 460F and this temperature is easy to reach if one is not careful or vigilant. Tin can also scratch or be damaged if the wrong utensils are used. If you do damage the lining it can be expensive to have it retinned (currently $5-8 per inch, including height). It is also more reactive than stainless steel.

For a more worry free experience I would opt for stainless lined copper. Keep in mind I have nothing against tin lined. I just would not recommend it others. People that want and under stand what comes with tined lined already know about it. Anyone that is asking for a recommendation probably does not have the knowledge or technique to maintain it.

hardline_42
01-31-2014, 04:21 PM
I do agree that thick vintage copper (3mm+) is excellent on a gas range. I do not agree that tin lined is the correct choice for most home users. First one has to be very experienced to make sure they do not damage it. Tin melts at 460F and this temperature is easy to reach if one is not careful or vigilant. Tin can also scratch or be damaged if the wrong utensils are used. If you do damage the lining it can be expensive to have it retinned (currently $5-8 per inch, including height). It is also more reactive than stainless steel.

For a more worry free experience I would opt for stainless lined copper. Keep in mind I have nothing against tin lined. I just would not recommend it others. People that want and under stand what comes with tined lined already know about it. Anyone that is asking for a recommendation probably does not have the knowledge or technique to maintain it.

I think the "pitfalls" of tin lining are a bit overblown, though it is undoubtedly more finicky than stainless and requires care (not unlike carbon steel and semi-stainless knives). One doesn't have to be "very experienced" to use it. Just don't heat an empty pot and keep the heat on medium, max (like with enameled cast iron). Use non-metal utensils (like on non-stick pans). Don't put in the dishwasher (like carbon steel, bare cast iron, fine china, cutlery, wood-handled utensils etc.). A tin lining can be repaired or replaced when damaged or worn. A stainless lining that separates due to overheating cannot. With regard to reactivity, it might not have the resistance to acidic food that stainless has, but it's leagues ahead of aluminum, cast iron, carbon steel and bare copper. It's also more naturally non-stick than stainless.

Of course, that's not to say that tin-lined copper is for everyone. It is the ne plus ultra for heat response (actually, that would be silver-lined copper but it's too hard to find) and many home cooks gladly cope with the added maintenance for the extra performance while, for some others, it's not worth it. The reason I mention it as an option is because it's the only way to get copper thicker than 2.5mm which directly affects the pan's heat capacity and is definitely something noticeable to even new users versus a typical 1.5 or 2mm pan. Otherwise, the difference in performance between a 2.5mm tin-lined and a 2.5mm SS-lined will be lost on a casual user.

Either way, it's good for the OP to hear from both sides on the issue of linings for copper cookware.

EdipisReks
02-02-2014, 03:08 PM
this (http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-1031590/Demeyere+Industry5+Essential+Pan) might be a good pan for you, gavination.

gavination
02-02-2014, 09:59 PM
Hardline and bk, thanks for the awesome insight into copper sauciers, or rather copper in general! I had done a bunch of research into copper before and always sat on the fence regarding getting some. At this point, I think SS may be the way to go until I finish grad school and won't have people in my kitchen touching my copper! Otherwise, I don't mind the extra, anal retentive care. :lol:

Edipis, it's funny you bring that up because I'm on my way to get the Atlantis one at SLT. It's a bit more expensive, but everything I have from Demeyere is from the same line. Therefore, I can't get an Industry 5. It simply won't match... :lol2: Compulsion? Not at all!!

You guys have been awesome as usual! I think I'm going to be rather stoked to be on the saucier bandwagon! I never would've thought I would be buying one!

Lucretia
02-02-2014, 11:36 PM
If you change your mind and want to go for copper, Falk is having a sale (http://eepurl.com/NzpyP) right now.

EdipisReks
02-02-2014, 11:57 PM
Copper does rock. I have about 10 pieces, mostly tinned, and I'm always looking for more.

gavination
02-03-2014, 12:49 AM
This is becoming a dangerous thread...

Lucretia
02-03-2014, 01:02 AM
I love the way copper cooks, but it is really HEAVY. I got a 3-quart saucepan a while back, and hubby has been using it for different things and been really impressed. Then he used it to melt chocolate with butter the other day and grumbled mightily about the fact that it really is heavy when he had to hold the pan with one hand while scraping chocolate out with the other. (I didn't laugh in front of him. Really.)

BTW, the new line from Falk with the stainless handle is really nice. It's more comfortable than the cast iron handle and stays a lot cooler.

EdipisReks
02-03-2014, 01:07 AM
CAST IRON HANDLES FOR LIFE. I also like 4mm thick 2.5 qt sauce pans that weigh 10 pounds, though, so maybe I'm weird. My particular example needs re-tinning, unfortunately, but it's amazing for hard boiled eggs. I bench over 300 pounds (or did, the last time I gave a **** about my body, which was in high school, half a life ago), though, so maybe the weight of copper is lost on me. My wife complained the one time she tried to use one, and never used one again, but that's a feature, not a bug.

Lucretia
02-03-2014, 01:12 AM
.... so maybe I'm weird...

MAYBE?!?!?!?

10 lbs is too much for me to handle. I'd give my eyeteeth for a copper dutch oven, but I wouldn't be able to pick the darn thing up.

gavination
02-03-2014, 01:12 AM
CAST IRON HANDLES FOR LIFE. I also like 4mm thick 2.5 qt sauce pans that weigh 10 pounds, though, so maybe I'm weird. My particular example needs re-tinning, unfortunately, but it's amazing for hard boiled eggs.

Hah! I have a penchant for old school, I have to admit. I also climb, so heavy **** just makes me climb harder. Sounds like I've been training for copper use transferring anything and everything in my 4.2 qt Demeyere sauté when it's full! :lol2: Grit your teeth and pronate!

That saucepan sounds amazing. Pictures Edipis!

Lucretia
02-03-2014, 01:16 AM
I just need a handsome young pot boy to schlep my heavy cookware around for me. :evilgrin:

EdipisReks
02-03-2014, 01:29 AM
That saucepan sounds amazing. Pictures Edipis!

It looks like any other old hammered-copper smallish sauce pan, until you pick it up.

EdipisReks
02-03-2014, 01:29 AM
I just need a handsome young pot boy to schlep my heavy cookware around for me. :evilgrin:

you were born in the wrong century, unfortunately.

gavination
02-03-2014, 01:34 AM
you were born in the wrong century, unfortunately.

Hahahaha! I did overseas trading and sourcing for a while. I could probably find you one! It was in textiles, but I still have contacts over there who are quite resourceful. :lol2:

hardline_42
02-03-2014, 09:26 AM
BTW, the new line from Falk with the stainless handle is really nice. It's more comfortable than the cast iron handle and stays a lot cooler.


CAST IRON HANDLES FOR LIFE.

Cast iron handles definitely win all the old school cool points. Unfortunately, they're heavy and they get hot (albeit slowly). This is where stainless handles shine, since stainless is such a poor heat conductor. Either is a better choice than bronze.

bkultra
02-03-2014, 03:04 PM
If you go copper, cast iron handles are a must IMO

boomchakabowwow
02-04-2014, 01:48 PM
without a doubt..a 4 qt.

the best one i have used to date..(i'm a home cook, only) is a Cuisinart Multiclad Unlimited..i think it was better than my similar All-clad (egads!!blasphemy)..they cooked the same, but the cuisinart pour liquids out...way better. i sold my allclad. the cuisinart has to be the best bang for the buck ever.

i am gonna buy a 2 qt and call it good.