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View Full Version : Mixer for nooooodles



ramenlegend
02-03-2014, 12:36 AM
Well, my kitchen aid finally went out on me. I'm looking for a new mixer for home noodle production. A large hobart mixer would be the best option, but it is out of my budget(seriously would have a 20 qt in the middle of my kitchen if I could afford it). I make a lot of alkaline noodles which is a tough dough, so i need it to be somewhat of a work horse. Any recommendations?

Erik

Lucretia
02-03-2014, 02:18 AM
I killed a couple of kitchenaids making bread. Actually, it was 3 of them. Now I have an Electrolux Assistent. Really happy with it. The only problem is that the price has really gone up since I bought mine.

pleue
02-03-2014, 02:56 AM
The old kitchenaids are small capacity but made by hobart. Hobart makes a commercial 10qt mixer that's quite common in used restaurant supply stores. I've seen em as low as $600 for a used one. What style of ramen are you making? Care to share any recipes? Source for kansui powder?

Talim
02-03-2014, 04:52 AM
Have you tried fixing your kitchenaid? It could be as simple as replacing a gear. You can buy parts online and find tutorials on Youtube.

ecchef
02-03-2014, 08:41 AM
+1 Lucretia. I've heard lots of good things about the Electrolux's ability to deal with pizza/pasta/bread dough.

rdm_magic
02-03-2014, 10:00 AM
We've broken two kitchenaids in 3 months where I work making bread. Now we just use a Hobart.

ramenlegend
02-03-2014, 01:41 PM
The old kitchenaids are small capacity but made by hobart. Hobart makes a commercial 10qt mixer that's quite common in used restaurant supply stores. I've seen em as low as $600 for a used one. What style of ramen are you making? Care to share any recipes? Source for kansui powder?

I don't have a certain set style of ramen I make, pretty much whichever stock I have frozen in the freezer (usually chicken or pork). Always curly alkaline though, I feel that straight tonkatsu style noodles are a waste of time. I've been using davids chang's noodle recipe for a few years now, it's simple and delicious.

800g bread flour,
300g water (this is an estimate, as needed)
7.2 g sodium carbonate,
.8 g potassium carbonate.
It's quite a bit different than egg pasta (can be a pain in the ass :knife:)

I have used Ivan Orkin's recipe (Toasted rye noodle) and it is tasty, but I prefer the simpler chang recipe. I got my sodium and potassium carbonate off of amazon years ago and i'm probably only about half way through it and I make fresh ramen frequently. I've tried the "baked" soda technique (bake baking soda at 275 for 1 hour), the results aren't as great but it works if you don't have the special order stuff. I have also used the kansui water from the asian market, but who knows if that stuff is safe to consume or not. Regardless, it wasn't any better than the powders.