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CoqaVin
02-21-2014, 01:10 PM
What is the best company or companies for pan sets not looking for vintage or cast iron either just a full set at a decent price since mine are getting cruddy at home and since I am not a home cook I don't know much about this whatsoever

jvanis
02-21-2014, 02:01 PM
take a peek at Westelm for some of their carbon saute pans, they have been on clearance and get rave reviews. As for pots, not sure where to go, but I picked up the Westelm ones here: Here (http://www.westelm.com/products/mrk-we-market-carbon-steel-de-buyer-frying-pan-8-d713/?pkey=e%7Cwe%2Bmarket%7C1%7Cbest%7C0%7C1%7C24%7C%7 C1&cm_src=PRODUCTSEARCH||NoFacet-_-NoFacet-_-NoMerchRules)

I have a set of stainless pots that I use, leftovers from All-Clad Emeril set.

You could also look at the Winco Pan on amazon, I have given a few of these as gifts, and use a couple at home. They are heavy, cook nicely, and last! Here (http://www.amazon.com/Winware-3-Ply-Stainless-Silicone-Sleeve/dp/B001BFX5A0/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1393005645&sr=8-6&keywords=winco+frying)

bkultra
02-21-2014, 02:08 PM
Sets often come with useless sizes, much like knife sets.

What is your budget?
Are you looking for pots and pans?
Is induction capable important?

CoqaVin
02-21-2014, 02:10 PM
Just frying pans like a 6 8 10

CoqaVin
02-21-2014, 02:12 PM
how are those carbon saute pans on non stick?

hardline_42
02-21-2014, 02:28 PM
how are those carbon saute pans on non stick?

They are more "stick" than non-stick (Teflon) pans but less than just about anything else, once seasoned.

CoqaVin
02-21-2014, 02:29 PM
are there good non stick (teflon) pans that last?

bkultra
02-21-2014, 02:32 PM
Carbon fry pans are great for high heat applications (searing etc). They need to be seasoned and they can be fairly non stick. You don't want to use them for foods high in acidity (it will remove/damage the seasoning). de Buyer is a great option for carbon steel pans. You can often find the 3 piece set (8,10,12) for $99-115 on chef's catalog.

You would still want a stainless steel option to go with them. Tramontina makes a good low cost option.

As for Teflon... Buy an inexpensive one they all wear out no matter the cost. I like vollrath

CoqaVin
02-21-2014, 02:38 PM
I know that carbon pan's are good for searing and stuff like that. I just want a pan that is all around non stick etc I can always add a carbon or cast iron for searing if I would like

bkultra
02-21-2014, 03:12 PM
http://www.webstaurantstore.com/vollrath-wear-ever-67610-10-non-stick-fry-pan-with-steelcoat-x3-interior-and-trivent-silicone-handle/92267610.html

daveb
02-21-2014, 09:52 PM
Swiss Diamond rocks my world for non stick. de Buyer for carbon. Only ss that I like is Viking (it only hurts once) And vintage Calphalon for sauce pans and stock pots. Hate All-Clad, Cleaning all-clad is pia.

If I was buying 2day I would go induction compatible except for SD.

Erilyn75
02-23-2014, 05:07 AM
If you're looking for good quality budget friendly stainless, Tramontina tri-ply is great. I picked up a set from Walmart with a few additional pieces for about $160. I did a comparison of a 12" tramontina and my mother in laws all clad and to me there wasn't such a difference between them to warrant the price difference.

I've also gotten rid of every Teflon non stick I had. They don't last, bubble and flake off into food. I did get a ceramic 12" tramontina for $12 and it's still cooking beautifully after 5 years. If it ever needs replacing, it's not a big investment.

CoqaVin
02-23-2014, 09:30 AM
Nothing too cheap and will last but not as expensive as all clad...I might just get one good pan and then just a cheaper set but not too cheap of different size pans

Zerob
02-23-2014, 10:55 AM
Cuisinart multiclad is good stuff at a great price point

CoqaVin
02-23-2014, 11:00 AM
how are there non stick properties?

Mucho Bocho
02-23-2014, 11:16 AM
If you're looking for good quality budget friendly stainless, Tramontina tri-ply is great. I picked up a set from Walmart with a few additional pieces for about $160. I did a comparison of a 12" tramontina and my mother in laws all clad and to me there wasn't such a difference between them to warrant the price difference.

I've also gotten rid of every Teflon non stick I had. They don't last, bubble and flake off into food. I did get a ceramic 12" tramontina for $12 and it's still cooking beautifully after 5 years. If it ever needs replacing, it's not a big investment.

I have this tramontana set and it's wonderful. All clad are built better and have a more refined finish but in all honesty don't cook any better. I've had the tra pans from Walmart for at least five years and they still look new. I don't think there is a better set for the money and they will last a lifetime was long as you don't shock them from screaming hot and then putt hem in cold water.

Erilyn75
02-24-2014, 04:02 AM
I have this tramontana set and it's wonderful. All clad are built better and have a more refined finish but in all honesty don't cook any better. I've had the tra pans from Walmart for at least five years and they still look new. I don't think there is a better set for the money and they will last a lifetime was long as you don't shock them from screaming hot and then putt hem in cold water.

You're right, best bang for your dollars for sure. I have turned many of my fellow military spouses onto these. They all love them and the ceramic non stick.

Zerob
02-24-2014, 11:44 AM
http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/08/equipment-the-all-clad-vs-tramontina-skillet.html

Very informative although a few yrs old.

Mucho Bocho
02-24-2014, 11:54 AM
Great share. My sentiments exactly, except I have both Allclad and tramontina



http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/08/equipment-the-all-clad-vs-tramontina-skillet.html

Very informative although a few yrs old.

CoqaVin
02-24-2014, 12:00 PM
Great share. My sentiments exactly, except I have both Allclad and tramontina

How are those all clads worth the money?

You know what I noticed while I was shopping for some pans A lot of companies that you think are good either made in Germany or Switzerland or whatever have a small Made in China sticker or marking somewhere on the tag.

Mucho Bocho
02-24-2014, 12:13 PM
I'm a fan of All clad too. Just picked up a 5ply AC 2.5 windsor and its now my favorite pan. Perfect for an induction hob too. I've been collecting select pans for at least ten years and have maybe six AC pans, three in copper core, three in AC D5, but at the end of the day the Tra are such a screaming deal, its hard not to go there first. I also have Debuyer, Lodge, leCrusset. I don't own any non-stick pans, got away from using them years ago.

CoqaVin
02-24-2014, 12:16 PM
I am trying to get away from the whole non stick thing as well How are the all clad with sticking to the pan?

I was in Le Creuset outlet the other day almost got one of them since they had some on such a good deal are they worth it though or are they just the name?

Do you have the De Buyer carbon pans

Mucho Bocho
02-24-2014, 12:22 PM
Yea I've got six debuyer fry pans, a roasting pan and 11" crepe. For what thye do, i do not believe there are any substitute.

Tri-ply stainless pans will all have a similar chacteristic. the trick to those pans is to really pre-heat them on a low flame. Also a little trick I use sometimes is:

pre-heat on low, then turn flame to cooking temp
put a tablespoon of high-heat oil in pan, use paper towel and carefully wipe that oil all over the pan.
Add oil for cooking, warm five seconds, add product.

Cast Enammel is good for long cooking and braising meats but really to slow at relasing heat to be used as a skillet used for searing.

CoqaVin
02-24-2014, 12:25 PM
So best for searing meat is a cast iron pan (lodge type) traditional cast iron or a carbon pan?

Erilyn75
02-25-2014, 12:19 AM
So best for searing meat is a cast iron pan (lodge type) traditional cast iron or a carbon pan?

I've never had a carbon pan but I LOVE my cast iron. I use them almost exclusively unless I need a pot or sauté pan or to toast spices and nuts. Lodge is good but a vintage Griswold, Wagner or Piqua Ware is better. They milled the inside smooth back in the day.

Here's a nice read on them http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/5794-Cast-Iron-Cookware

CoqaVin
02-25-2014, 08:53 AM
where can you get those on the bay?

daveb
02-25-2014, 10:06 AM
Search vintage Griswold, Wagner or Piqua Ware.

hardline_42
02-25-2014, 10:33 AM
So best for searing meat is a cast iron pan (lodge type) traditional cast iron or a carbon pan?

Both are excellent for searing meat, but carbon has the benefit of being smooth from the start (unless you buy vintage cast iron) and lighter than similar sized cast iron. Cast iron can hold heat a little better due to it's mass, which is beneficial when searing large cuts of meat. I like, and use, both but if I had room for just one, I'd go with carbon steel.

Erilyn75
02-26-2014, 06:02 AM
where can you get those on the bay?

Yes. Don't get hung up on the Griswold large logo vs small logo. Unless you're a collector and wish to display them (which I still don't understand) then it doesn't matter, they all cook the same. I researched this and asked questions for about 6 months before I made the investment. The only difference is the year they were made and the money you will pay. My favorite is the Piqua Ware only because it's lighter in weight but it cooks the same as the griswolds and Wagner I have. The only thing you want to make sure of is there's no pitting and it sits flat. If the seller doesn't mention it, ask them. A lot of times buyers won't take the time to ask about it so you can get a steal.

Erilyn75
02-26-2014, 06:09 AM
Oh and if you decide to take the plunge into vintage cast iron, here are 2 sites that are great for reference

http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/


http://www.panman.com/sizecharts.html

rahimlee54
02-26-2014, 07:10 AM
I'd say grab an expensive or even cheap saucier, I finally got one after putting it off for years and we use that thing non stop. Cuisineart makes an affordable decent SS one, all clad and the demeyere for 30% off currently at SLT for more expensive ones.

ecchef
02-26-2014, 07:25 AM
http://paderno.com/specials/

Always liked this brand. $500 for the 14 pc. Fusion set is something I would seriously consider.

boomchakabowwow
02-28-2014, 08:14 PM
i'd never buy a set.

but the Calphalon Multiclad unlimited stuff is awesome. pick a few you like. my 4qt sauce pan is amazing. it outdid my allclad.

tomsch
05-19-2014, 09:15 PM
I use my De Buyer for everything except for sauces and anything acidic that will take off the seasoning. Works great for eggs with no sticking. Clean-up is great and I season it on the stove with flax seed oil. My LG has a "super boil" burner that can bring the pan up to the oils smoke point. I've put over 10 cycles of seasoning on and if it starts to stick even a little I'll scrub the hell out of it with hot water and run another cycle of heating the pan, apply oil, heat until smoke.

http://i922.photobucket.com/albums/ad70/tomsch63/securedownload_zpsc29ee704.jpg

Swiss4
06-16-2014, 10:42 PM
I know this is an old thread but I might suggest considering pots and pans that 1.) are also induction rated, and 2.) ceramic non-stick coated.

The reason is that although new to the US market, such pans can be used on any cooktop ( Gas, Ceramic, Electric, and Induction compliant ), and that the ceramic coated pans are very non-stick and non-chip. Some, like one of ours, can also be used to bake with.

bkdc
06-16-2014, 10:55 PM
Debuyer Mineral (or Mineral B). You have the benefits of cast iron with a handle that stays cool. It's already been stated. If you want a set of 3, you can get a 8, 10, and 12 inch set for 150 bucks. Mine have gotten warped from a long period of misuse, and I'm thinking of getting another set.

All-Clad is a good company, but it's gotten too popular. For a stainless fry pan, you can't beat the 5-mm thick Demeyere Proline. Actually, I can't think of a higher quality stainless fry pan. The All-Clad copper core line pans are all 2mm thick total. It's actually disappointing to see. The early copper core pans were 3mm thick throughout and heated way more evenly as the inner aluminum layer was just as thick as the copper core layer. There is really no functional benefit of the overpriced copper line, and I'd stick with the aluminum clad stuff and save the cash.

You can currently purchase the 9.4" Demeyere Proline on Wayfair for $120 shipped, and that is a steal of a deal.

daveb
06-16-2014, 10:56 PM
Do they sear Spam well?

Umberto
06-16-2014, 11:16 PM
Costco made some cookware a few years back that was made in Italy...It had copper rings bonded to them...the rivets handles etc...very much All Clad quality at a fraction of the price. If you can find them in a thrift shop grab them they are good.