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stevenStefano
03-24-2014, 10:03 PM
Perhaps this is a silly question, but I must ask it. Basically where I work they aren't super strict about what clothes you wear and generally I wear an expensive Chef jacket and decent clothes, apron etc. However, the weather is starting to heat up a bit and I find the jacket pretty unbearable and I often resort to taking it off and just wearing a plain white T shirt. However, sometimes customers will see me and I think it doesn't look great and I am looking for ideas. So do any of you guys wear any informal clothing that is still presentable and doesn't look out of place in the kitchen? I am considering either buying an expensive white T shirt or perhaps just a formal white shirt, something comfortable that still looks ok. Any ideas/photos are welcome

jbl
03-24-2014, 10:15 PM
Hey dude,
I sometimes wear bakers' shirts like this one -http://www.russums-shop.co.uk/clothing-c4/coats-and-workwear-c14/unisex-bakers-tunic-white-polycotton-short-sleeves-p232

I also wore white t shirts at a 2 Michelin starred restaurant as dress code, but spent a fortune as they seem harder to keep white and are prone to shrinkage...

jared08
03-24-2014, 10:22 PM
I wear I nice short sleeve white jacket with black lapel/trim(basically a nice dishwashers coat). It's cool and looks professional at the same time.

labor of love
03-24-2014, 10:23 PM
Steven, down here in louisiana its very hot and muggy much of the year. Ive never worked at a place that had decent ac conditioning either. My favorite work attire that minimizes the suffering is button up white collar shirts like this http://www.chefworks.com/?page=shop/flypage_201304&product_id=621&category=kitchenshirts_cookshirts&PHPSESSID=i3v50nq4irl0jc7lkq8c4svdq3
The ones ventilated back chef shirts/coats dont seem to be noticeably cooler to me so i dont bother with them.
Im not too into chefwear pants, i think they look rather silly on me. But theyre still pretty lightweight and breathable compared to any other pants ive ever worn at work. Im just to vein to order more.
For underwear in the summertime i wear under armor boxer briefs or cheap knock offs that wick away moisture and decrease chafing on longer shifts.

labor of love
03-24-2014, 10:24 PM
Steven, down here in louisiana its very hot and muggy much of the year. Ive never worked at a place that had decent ac conditioning either. My favorite work attire that minimizes the suffering is button up white collar shirts like this http://www.chefworks.com/?page=shop/flypage_201304&product_id=621&category=kitchenshirts_cookshirts&PHPSESSID=i3v50nq4irl0jc7lkq8c4svdq3
The ones ventilated back chef shirts/coats dont seem to be noticeably cooler to me so i dont bother with them.
Im not too into chefwear pants, i think they look rather silly on me. But theyre still pretty lightweight and breathable compared to any other pants ive ever worn at work. Im just to vein to order more.
For underwear in the summertime i wear under armor boxer briefs or cheap knock offs that wick away moisture and decrease chafing on longer shifts.
I prefer getting the cheaper cook shirts because at $10-15 per shirt theyre pretty inexpensive to replace once they get trashed after a 5-6 month period.

Jordanp
03-24-2014, 10:29 PM
Yea the bakers shirts don't look too bad I just wear a short sleeve jacket year round though.

stevenStefano
03-24-2014, 10:33 PM
If anyone is curious I bought one of these Le Chef Prep Shirts (http://www.lechefuniforms.com/ProductGroupItem.asp?PrGrp=794) today, I thought it would be perfect but it's a terrible fit, way too loose but yet really tight at the neck so I must try something different

ShaggySean
03-24-2014, 10:54 PM
I wear chef jackets most of the time but I work in the hottest kitchen ever and I wear T shirts alot most of the time I just wear one from a brewery we serve but I do wear a f@#K salad sorry on occasion

Dardeau
03-24-2014, 11:00 PM
The last two jobs I've had have cotton or poly cooks shirts. I'm so used to them at this point I don't know if I could go back to coats for anything other than photos or offsites.

JDA_NC
03-24-2014, 11:25 PM
To quote the Au Pied de Cochon cookbook:

"... The cooks do not wear uniforms. Cooks' uniforms are outdated, and haven't changed at all in two centuries. The simple act of putting on a uniform seems to be all it takes to convince folks that the cook knows what he's doing. This is pretty typical of our times; we're more concerned with the image of the cook than we are with the cook himself. I want my T-shirted crew to be considered among the elite not for the image they project, but for the quality of their cooking. I prepare food to make people happy. And a uniform just makes me sad. If snazzy outfits are what you want, it might be an idea to try the local Dunkin' Donuts. - MP"

I agree 100% with that. A clean t-shirt (not undershirt), chef pants or jeans, and a hat - all you need IMO. I hate having to wear jackets.

Edit: Just to be clear, I didn't mean that as an insult or commentary towards you Steven. Just in response to some of the people I've come across who spend tons of money on their double-breasted, seersucker jackets w/ names & titles - like it actually means something.

ShaggySean
03-24-2014, 11:46 PM
I wear a tshirt when nothing else is available a level of dignity that comes from years of tradition. I don't work out of uniform lightly cause I respect where it come from. And I promise you when it is at its hottest in the summer a chef coast is more breathable and cooler than a shirt

brainsausage
03-25-2014, 12:21 AM
Jeans and a tshirt(monogrammed with our bitchin logo). I wear an apron up bistro style if I'm feeling fancy. If you want to impress- shave and keep your hair well groomed. I'm covered in tats(down to my knucks), and I get better response by far when I'm dressed down a little, than when I've been sporting the double breasted, knot buttoned, full sleeve coat. If you look comfortable, and confident, that will instantly elevate people's opinions of you(typically without them even knowing it).

knyfeknerd
03-25-2014, 01:13 AM
Nothin' but jackets here. The short-sleeve ones ore decent, the ones with the breathable back are just OK. I'm so used to a full-sleeve coat that I just feel like a scrub in anything else. Old habits die hard.

barramonday
03-25-2014, 08:26 AM
I'd always worn jackets in the past , when I came to Cairns ( a very tropical place ) I switched to a black T shirt ,chef pants and blue pin stripe bib apron.
Most places in town seem to be fine with that, it's a little cooler than the standard jacket.

marc4pt0
03-25-2014, 08:48 AM
Jackets all day long with the exception of the sweltering hot days. Then it's t-shirts during prep and back to chef coat during service. I firmly believe in image. Whatever you choose, it should be clean. Working in kitchens it's no excuse for sloppiness. You can have 3 "stars" (or whatever) all day long, but if you can't keep your clothes clean, f*ck your reviews. That's a direct result of carelessness and lack of talent. I can't trust food served by a filthy, careless pig.

This comes from a guy with no tats, piercings or any of today's hipness. For me it's always been about the product first, staff second. I say staff second because I really don't mind all the tats, and some days I'm down right envious. But I've had more than my fair share of tatted up idiots in worn out denim come into my kitchens thinking they were something big and trendy to today's standards. Yet they couldn't produce sh*t. I will applaud their hardcore belief in image as it equals mine, but c'mon, you gotta give more.

So, I hate to say it but in my kitchen under my hoods, it's black or grey chef pants, and white, gray or black chef coats only. If it's t-shirt time, then PLAIN white or black only. And of course black non slip shoes only. You want to express yourself and show the uncaring world just how cool you really are? Throw on some groovy socks- like the rest of the world I could care less. The time to express yourself on the clock is through your food, the art medium you chose to make a living with. Off the clock, go crazy with your chains and fedoras. I for one wish that the fedora makes a strong comeback because I still struggle from time to time with the confidence it takes to wear any of mine.

CoqaVin
03-25-2014, 08:50 AM
^This Traditions die hard...It is always a different ball game when it comes to service

marc4pt0
03-25-2014, 08:55 AM
I should also add that I get kids in perfectly pressed chef coat and pants who also can't perform worth a smack. But that is a very rare occasion comparatively. Typically if you care enough to press that shirt, you care about something else as well.

brainsausage
03-25-2014, 10:28 AM
Meh. Chef coats and pants are from a bygone era IMO. It's like the Michelin system, charging too much for too much staff to maintain 'appearances'. Having tattoos and wearing jeans in a kitchen has nothing to do with trying to impress people, it's not giving a **** about what people think of you and letting the food speak for itself. The cookie cutter cult of personality thing has run rampant in our society. Btw- I'm not saying you should show up looking like you came off a two week bender, but as long as your clothes are clean, you're wearing proper footwear, keep your hair covered if it's long...

The food is all that matters.

CoqaVin
03-25-2014, 10:42 AM
I agree whatever works as long as your clean on the line

brainsausage
03-25-2014, 10:45 AM
Sorry to get off topic Chris. Feel free to delete that. I haven't had my coffee yet...

Sherski
03-25-2014, 12:43 PM
Meh. Chef coats and pants are from a bygone era IMO. It's like the Michelin system, charging too much for too much staff to maintain 'appearances'. Having tattoos and wearing jeans in a kitchen has nothing to do with trying to impress people, it's not giving a **** about what people think of you and letting the food speak for itself. The cookie cutter cult of personality thing has run rampant in our society. Btw- I'm not saying you should show up looking like you came off a two week bender, but as long as your clothes are clean, you're wearing proper footwear, keep your hair covered if it's long...

The food is all that matters.

I'm sorry mate. As I was reading along,I kept looking at your picture of moe. And no matter how much I try,I keep hearing his voice narrating every one of your posts. Anyone else encountered this?:tongue:

marc4pt0
03-25-2014, 01:27 PM
I can't agree with the bygone era thing, but I do get a chuckle over the notion.
Then again, I did try out wearing the dish shirt last summer and much say I really dug it. I did have my logo on it and I did iron the things every morning (like I do with my jackets). And just recently I went "outside the box" again and got 1 black jacket and 1 grey jacket, both with the cool mesh thingy going on. OOOOoohhhhh
Much different then the finer Egyptian cotton, but I really like them as well. So maybe I am re-inventing my uniform a bit...?

I still say that I agree with the importance of a uniform, whatever it may be. For those in the BOH it should certainly be comfortable. No paper hats or those neckerchiefs for crying out loud. If you are in view of the guests, I think it should be a logo t-shirt with the either the establishment's name or theme on there, or like I refer to as the dish shirt which usually has the snap-up front. But no jeans. Too casual and I can't imagine wearing them in a hot-as-balls kitchen during the summer. Then again, I've never had the luxury of working in a kitchen that has AC as most of these newer places seem to afford.

brainsausage
03-25-2014, 02:05 PM
I've heard the French Laundry's kitchen is carpeted...

brainsausage
03-25-2014, 02:06 PM
I'm sorry mate. As I was reading along,I kept looking at your picture of moe. And no matter how much I try,I keep hearing his voice narrating every one of your posts. Anyone else encountered this?:tongue:

That's a portrait of me. Who's this Moe guy?

ThEoRy
03-25-2014, 02:19 PM
Place me firmly in the bygone era camp. There is a reason the jacket was created in the first place, protection. Beyond that, at this point it is indeed a symbol of the culture from which it hails. Putting on the jacket places you in that culture from that bygone era. I feel proud to say that I'm a part of that culture. It's like being a modern day Templar or something to that effect. I take pride in my uniform. Hair, face, fingernails, jacket, apron, pants, shoes. Clean, neat and presentable at all times. Wanna wear blue jeans? Go on a TV cooking show. T-shirt and jeans? I hear Chilli's and TGI Fridays are hiring.

brainsausage
03-25-2014, 02:48 PM
Dammit, I was just about to hit send on my resume to you Rick;)

Maybe bygone era is a bit harsh on my part, and I apologize if I offended anybody. Wasn't my intent. But I do think its a bit insulting to imply that you can't make decent food without wearing a chef coat/pants.

marc4pt0
03-25-2014, 04:23 PM
If my comments implied that, then my apologies.

And that will count for my one apology a day policy.
But I seriously wasn't implying that, just offering my take as well.

ThEoRy
03-25-2014, 05:14 PM
Dammit, I was just about to hit send on my resume to you Rick;)

Maybe bygone era is a bit harsh on my part, and I apologize if I offended anybody. Wasn't my intent. But I do think its a bit insulting to imply that you can't make decent food without wearing a chef coat/pants.

I wasn't implying you can't make great food without the uni on. I guess I'm just a traditionalist in the workplace hygiene/uniform department.

JDA_NC
03-25-2014, 06:18 PM
Wanna wear blue jeans? Go on a TV cooking show.

Strange. I don't wear jeans (period - in or out of work) and much prefer chef pants, but the majority of chefs I've worked for, especially in high-end restaurants, all wore jeans in the kitchen.

I suppose everyone has their own views and notions. I think chef jackets are silly and want no part of that culture - but we'll all agree being clean and presentable is priority #1

turbochef422
03-25-2014, 08:03 PM
I was taught to be seen as a chef the first step is to look like one. The owners I worked for ( a big kitchen) wanted me to stand out and people take notice when I walk through. I've done it ever since. It works maybe not the only way but it works.

stevenStefano
03-25-2014, 08:21 PM
I kinda agree about image which is why I'm looking for something presentable. Saying that, I like to think I always look presentable ie clean clothes and clean shaven. I usually wear a short sleeve jacket with the Coolmax panels but I find it unbearable when it's warm. Might try rolling up the sleeves or something to see if it's better or maybe wear a rashguard underneath to absorb sweat. I am also considering buying a decent quality white T shirt and getting a pen pocket sewed on. All the ideas so far have been great. So far I am leaning towards a plain white Hilfiger T shirt

ramenlegend
03-25-2014, 08:25 PM
white coat, black pants, and apron. Anything else attracts hipster foodies and their yelp apps.

JHunter
03-25-2014, 08:37 PM
this has been an interesting thread to follow as I agree with the "old school" mentality but wear great socks! As for the OP try under armor or similar beneath your coat it helps to keep ya cool.

stevenStefano
03-25-2014, 08:43 PM
I've been for trials in a few super high-end places and in some i was pretty alarmed at how scruffy everyone was, yet in another the Head Chef chastised me for not having all the buttons on my jacket done up, he was a real traditionalist. Where I am at the minute to be honest I've been there so long I don't have to worry about what other people think

panda
03-26-2014, 03:05 AM
jacket yes, but sleeves rolled above elbow and top button unbuttoned. pair of comfy breathable slacks, full apron not just below waist non sense. i could give two sh1ts about the image, it's just practical. the jacket is more comfortable in the summer somehow than a tshirt, and also offers a layer of protection from grossness/pain. pants wear what ever you want, but the material matters. dense stuff feels disgusting. jeans? why, to be cool??? that's idiotic at best.

to be honest though, if i could get away with it, i would wear sleeveless sweat-wicking shirt, athletic shorts, and flip flops :D

kpeddie2010
03-26-2014, 06:11 AM
Nothin' but jackets here. The short-sleeve ones ore decent, the ones with the breathable back are just OK. I'm so used to a full-sleeve coat that I just feel like a scrub in anything else. Old habits die hard.

ditto

snowbrother
03-29-2014, 05:49 AM
I started wearing one of these (http://www.chefwear.com/store/item.asp?ITEM_ID=215&DEPARTMENT_ID=5) in white. It looks presentable enough to wear in front of guests, but it is extremely cool for a jacket and very comfortable.

panda
04-02-2014, 09:53 AM
wait, people actually wear jeans in kitchens?? that's gotta feel so gross!

chefcomesback
04-02-2014, 10:44 AM
Jackets for me in my kitchen despite the temperatures here ( saw 122 f -45c last year, no wonder they hate me :) no jeans allowed either , can't shake off the hotels background


Sent from my iPhone using Kitchen Knife Forum

Chuckles
04-02-2014, 10:55 AM
I wore jeans and a short sleeved black dickies work short with name and title embroidered on at the last job. The dining room was very informal so it seemed like it fit. Now I wear fancy pants and a nice chef coat, full apron until expo time starts. I still have to roll up the sleeves. I really don't like 3/4 length sleeves, I would dip them in everything.

Jeans gross? I usually feel pretty gross so it is hard to pin it on the pants. It's usually just a result of crippling guilt and regret. Nothing a new knife can't fix.

panda
04-02-2014, 11:18 AM
lol, jeans are so heavy, doesn't it get intensely swampy with them on? :D

mdkraus13
04-19-2014, 08:16 PM
tillist.com!!!best chef clothing ive seen in quite a while!

jgraeff
04-21-2014, 02:01 PM
tillist.com!!!best chef clothing ive seen in quite a while!
I agree just pre ordered will write a review once I get them

CoqaVin
04-21-2014, 02:58 PM
I agree just pre ordered will write a review once I get them

Tilit?

labor of love
04-21-2014, 11:29 PM
http://www.tilitchefgoods.com/ just looks like overpriced hipster clothes to me.

panda
04-22-2014, 12:48 AM
wow those look annoying

marc4pt0
04-22-2014, 09:14 AM
I do really like the idea of the apron tab at the back of the neck. If that jacket wasn't so dang over priced I'd try one out

CanadianMan
04-22-2014, 09:51 AM
http://www.tilitchefgoods.com/ just looks like overpriced hipster clothes to me.

+1
Looks like hipster gear, the models look like hipster.

Dardeau
04-22-2014, 10:29 AM
83 dollars for pants you are going to spill bleach and blood on. Who are they marketing to? Most cooks would rather spend their cash on food and beer. And knives.

CoqaVin
04-22-2014, 10:45 AM
I know right I do not get those prices what so ever

knyfeknerd
04-22-2014, 10:48 AM
Not feeling the skinny jean style chef pants.
To each his/her own................
............but definitely not for me.
I can't believe how expensive those freakin' aprons are.
Looking forward to a review though.

CoqaVin
04-22-2014, 10:50 AM
skinny pants in the kitchen really? no thanks I need the baggy to help stuff breath since is is hot as **** in my kitchen

ThEoRy
04-22-2014, 11:51 AM
"You guys aren't using Global knives? (eye roll)"

http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0162/0516/products/MigsBlackShirtBlackPants_1024x1024.jpg?v=139456663 2

Chuckles
04-22-2014, 12:51 PM
The work shirts and chef coats on the site may be good for the situations described in this thread but.... This is not helping their cause at all.

longhorn
04-22-2014, 12:52 PM
I got some pants from them when they were on clearance for like 20 bucks. The material they are made out of is super light and breathable and I got a size or two bigger so they aren't so tight and I always wear a belt to work anyway (no plumbers crack).

Besides the fact that it is a small company and everything is made in the USA I do have a hard time understanding why their prices are so high at times.

CoqaVin
04-22-2014, 12:55 PM
Global knives suck big time

Chuckles
04-22-2014, 01:03 PM
Dickies work shirt is less than $20. Just sayin. Spend the savings on quality hair product.

http://www.amazon.com/Dickies-Mens-Short-Sleeve-Shirt/dp/B000N8Q56C

jgraeff
04-22-2014, 01:09 PM
They say full refund and return shipping so il let you guys know, def overpriced but I want to Check them out. Over chef wear and chef works is ok. All my happy chef is In the garbage nice while it last about 2 years.

ThEoRy
04-22-2014, 04:47 PM
Global knives suck big time

But it's the Official Knife of the Pretentious Douche Bag Chef!!

CoqaVin
04-22-2014, 06:05 PM
who "think" they are the best I do not get it

labor of love
04-22-2014, 06:48 PM
i like the aprons....anybody know where i could get a similar apron, but cheaper?

CoqaVin
04-22-2014, 06:52 PM
yea if they weren't 80 bills

bbonham07
04-24-2014, 10:35 AM
dishwasher shirts work well. i use chef works short sleeve and they are really comfortable and long enough in the back if your tall.

bbonham07
04-24-2014, 10:47 AM
http://www.bragardusa.com/chef-apparel/chef-aprons-cooking-aprons/travail-bibbw-apron.

most comfortable apron ive ever worn. this aint no hipster ****.

chefbolchoz
04-24-2014, 02:00 PM
happy chef utility shirts are my go to, great color variety and only 8.95 a piece if you buy a handful of them

jgraeff
05-31-2014, 12:36 PM
Guys have to say tilit chef coats are really nice in my opinion. As good as any executive chef jacket from chef wear or chef works. I like the neck as it doesn't rub as much and the stretchy sides. Haven't had to wash much will have to comment on wear and tear later on. The shirts I wouldn't purchase for work clothes though stick with Cheaper stuff for sure. Pants are pretty nice if you want to keep some for nice events