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Marko Tsourkan
06-28-2011, 07:29 PM
Knife skill class - waste of money or not? I am 30 min away from NYC. Will travel. :)

M

ThEoRy
06-28-2011, 08:03 PM
Depends. How much is it and what do they teach you? I say experience is the best teacher but you may pick up a few tips.

Eamon Burke
06-28-2011, 08:28 PM
I think a lot of people could benefit from a knife skills class when switching disciplines, most notably, from dull knives to sharp knives. It's a different skill set--I've seen cooks that can do things with dull knives I couldn't do without a LOT of practice, and while I still 100% advocate really sharp knives, it's a different set of skills because the pressure required is totally different, among other things.

If you already have had sharp knives for a while, you will learn nothing you can't get from some youtube videos. Nobody's going to stand behind you and work you like a puppet like they do in sexy Golfing lessons.

El Pescador
06-28-2011, 09:03 PM
Stay away from classicly trained chefs. They tend to teach skills that favor using a European profile knife.

Pesky

Marko Tsourkan
06-28-2011, 10:02 PM
I guess, I will have to invite some people over. :)

EdipisReks
06-29-2011, 12:21 AM
who is teaching it?

JohnnyChance
06-29-2011, 01:26 AM
I guess, I will have to invite some people over. :)

Much better idea.

AnxiousCowboy
06-29-2011, 02:47 AM
What do you know now and what do you want to learn?

Marko Tsourkan
06-29-2011, 05:05 PM
What do you know now and what do you want to learn?

I know little, though I cook and use knives regularly. I would like to know what is the proper way to cut things, i.e. vegetables, meats, fish, poultry, etc.

M

heirkb
06-29-2011, 10:47 PM
I think there's a ton you can learn by watching YouTube videos. That's at least what a lot of people have recommended to me when I've asked similar questions. I can't see a reason for a cutting class unless you're looking for very specific techniques (e.g. European or Japanese decorative vegetable carving, cutting sashimi, etc.). Other than those special techniques, cutting cubes, batonets, triangles, etc. is all the same, right? I don't really have a lot of experience (I'm a home cook), though, so I might be wrong.

Just read your post about fish and poultry. I've been curious about a similar thing. I wonder if I should just watch itasan a lot or if there's a good place to learn techniques for using a Deba to break down fish. I'm thinking I'll have to go with itasan, but I'm not sure.

BraisedorStewed
06-29-2011, 11:05 PM
I know little, though I cook and use knives regularly. I would like to know what is the proper way to cut things, i.e. vegetables, meats, fish, poultry, etc.

M

If you want to learn how to do things like how break down chicken and vegetables there are many different methods. That being said, video's and books are really great to see multiple methods of say breaking down a chicken, or peeling and dicing onions. In addition most classes are going to focus on things like how to hold a knife, how to use the claw grip, stance and maybe a few basic breakdowns like a chicken, onion, and maybe a carrot or pepper. I doubt these are things you wouldn't pick up just as easily from videos and books.

Also I'm sure you do work for some NYC chefs, why not see if one of them will show you some stuff, maybe for some discounted work, then you know the caliber of the person who is teaching you going in, plus chefs have a lot more stuff in their kitchen to show than most knife skills classes could ever hope for.

Cheers
Drew

AnxiousCowboy
06-30-2011, 01:01 AM
I have experience cutting vegetables and butchering meat, not as much fish, though. Let me know if there's anything I can do for you....