PDA

View Full Version : Restaurant bans young children



jaybett
07-14-2011, 02:38 AM
The Wall Street Journal reported on a restaurant in Pennsylvania that banned children 6 or younger. A recent poll by a news station found over 60 percent approved of the ban.

I am sympathetic to the problems a parent can have bringing a child to a restaurant. I've never understood, though why I should have to endure a child's melt down.

Jay

JohnnyChance
07-14-2011, 03:07 AM
If it is the type of restaurant that children wouldn't enjoy or appreciate, then I could easily see it helping business, not hurting it. I know parents have to take their kids out, but it doesnt mean you have to take them to a high end place. Go there when you have a babysitter.

MadMel
07-14-2011, 04:59 AM
It's a good move if it's one of those high-end places, or even just a semi-fine place. I get really pissed off when I hear children screaming and crying when I'm trying to enjoy the whole dining experience. Unless of course you have really well behaved kids.

obtuse
07-14-2011, 07:04 AM
Children should not be seen, nor heard.

mainaman
07-14-2011, 07:44 AM
Young kids can be a handful, some behave some are pain in the butt to deal with .
Parents should be considerate of others when it comes to restaurants and may be not take their kids where they will not be able to endure the entire time with no meltdowns.
If the kids are brought up properly, it should be no problem I think.

I wonder of all that posted so far how many have kids?

ecchef
07-14-2011, 07:46 AM
I totally agree with this. I wish they would impose the same restrictions on young children as they do on smoking. :rant:

99Limited
07-14-2011, 07:54 AM
I wish all restaurants with a bar area would ban everyone under 21 from the bar. This should be THE one safe haven from family with kids.

Eamon Burke
07-14-2011, 09:37 AM
Shoot, I used to love checking out new places to eat. Now I have 2 toddlers. We eat at 4 restaurants, and one is in a grocery store. My kids are very well behaved and happy, but they are happy because we don't take them to restaurants that we can't deal with them in.

Blows my mind when I see people bring kids into places with lit candles, stools, no kids menu, or too much ambiance(tvs everywhere, loud music). Take your kids to a place where kids do well--with short wait times, booths, coloring placemats, healthy kid-friendly meals(good luck with that), and few distractions. We eat at Panera Bread, Freebirds, a local Mediterranean place, and a grocery store(Central Market).

Hattorichop
07-14-2011, 11:40 AM
Children should not be seen, nor heard.

WOW.........I'd hate to be your child

On a more serious note, I do agree that a mojour part of the dining experience has alot to do with the atmosphere and ambiance of the surroundings. A whining child could ruin a pleasurable evening out in an instant.

Parent should be more selective on where they take their children for
dinner but some parents just do not care. So I think it's only fair that the restaurant has the right to allow who it wants to dine in their establishment.

Dubsy
07-14-2011, 11:41 AM
my fiance's aunt left town for a week and we were looking after them (they're 4yr old twins, and a 6 year old). my friend called, and asked us out to a local mediteranean place, quite like a tapas bar. it was one of the higher end places in town. my fiance refused to go unless we bring the kids, even though i could get a babysitter, and my parents love those kids to death. i'm scared for when we have kids :'(

mr drinky
07-14-2011, 12:48 PM
Interesting conversation as I may be pissing some people off in a couple of days by bringing my kid to a nicer place. Our babysitter cancelled on us and it is in a different city (so I don't have a back up). What I did was I called the restaurant and asked if kids were 'acceptable' or not. I was ready to cancel but the guy actually convinced me that it could work. He also put a note in the reservation so that we could get a table that is more child friendly.

Here are some additional considerations though as I don't think this issue is black and white.

* Very young infants are often the best to take as they sleep the whole time. Past 6 months kids become much more difficult to take to restaurants.
* Book reservations really early or right when the open. Few people are there and you get your food quickly.
* Be prepared. Order right away and if the child starts crying accept that one of you may have to leave the restaurant, tag team it, or get your food to go.
* If all goes wrong and you really disturb the people next to you, then buy them a drink or ask the waiter quietly to pay for their bottle of wine and take it off their bill.

But with that said, I hate it when parents bring a child that they know will cry. It ruins it for all the parents who know their children well and have well-behaved kids.

k.

JohnnyChance
07-14-2011, 12:57 PM
I used to work at a family restaurant with an open kitchen. Obviously there were kids there. Mostly they were fine, but sometimes parents with an infant/very young child would just let the thing cry and cry and cry. Like Drinky said, if you go out with a young kid, you accept the risk of it cryings its brains out and you have to get up from the table, at least for a break. Maybe you are used to it, but not everyone is, just be courteous.

unkajonet
07-14-2011, 02:39 PM
I wonder if people take note of how many times they've been in a restaurant and the children present were well behaved?
I think Drinky's suggestions are more than fair. It's commendable that someone is willing to expose the younger ones to a different environment, with different people, and food other than McDonald's. If the kid has a meltdown of some sort, by all means, be courteous to the other patrons and take action. But don't blame the restaurant for opening their doors to families. If you don't like restaurants that allows children, isn't it on you to find a spot that caters to your wants?

And no, I don't have kids. But I believe that children are "he" and "she." Not "it."

ajhuff
07-14-2011, 04:24 PM
We took my daughter to Au Pied du Cochon in Montreal at age two, no problems. I've had to carry her out screaming and flailing at our local BBQ joint. I find an out right ban to be over the top. I think parents take their kids out because most times kids behave. You have no idea when they will melt down. It's out of your control. How you deal with it is what is important. It actually irks me when I get glares from other people.

-AJ

SpikeC
07-14-2011, 04:27 PM
Drinky's got it right, I think.

99Limited
07-14-2011, 04:32 PM
I wonder if people take note of how many times they've been in a restaurant and the children present were well behaved? ...

I've actually gone up to parents that had well behaved small kids and complemented them. I know it makes them feel good and I glad I did it. Families with noisy kids, I just let them slide.

dough
07-14-2011, 04:37 PM
haha this restaurant is in my area. oddly enough on saturday we had three barefoot children running around our restaurant... in and out the bathrooms... tried to go behind the bar and into the kitchen while the parents happily ate and drank.
them sorts of things dont happen often at our restaurant... more often we have crying kids that need to be appeased with a food or treats or going outside. i think they even have some little bendable wax stick thing as toys so kids can play a bit at the table.
i am happy to see the ban because restaurants are at a disadvantage dealing with this issue. one mother that commented on this said something to the effect just because my kids are the center of my world they shouldnt be the center of yours. i think that is a more thoughtful response then the many outraged parents that claim to boycott the restaurant.
its a bad situation because im sure most restaurants arent in a position to discourage potential business but on the other hand disruptive kids at one table can hurt business by causing other tables to rush their meals... not buy that extra drink or dessert. sometimes ya gotta choose between the lesser of two evils.

Eamon Burke
07-14-2011, 08:14 PM
It is worth noting, however, to the general public that when single people see parents with kids that are throwing a fit and ignoring them, they assume they don't care about the fact that their kid is annoying everyone. And when a parent is snapping at their kid constantly while the kid fusses, they assume it's because the parent doesn't have control of their children.

The truth is, the snapping indicates the parents have no control over themselves, and the parents ignoring their kid are doing the best thing to keep their kid from turning into a 15 year old that cries at the table because they were told to put their phone away. When my daughter was 1, she'd scream bloody murder in the grocery store, and I never budged or looked at her. She doesn't do that anymore!

steeley
07-15-2011, 05:49 AM
Kids can be sticky .
most of the time the F.O.H bends over backwards to help parents with kids .
i say bans are stupid.
we are there to feed are guest .

steeley
07-15-2011, 05:59 AM
I was with some kids at a fine establishment
food and drink was outstanding and all were very well behaved.
and the fine host could not have been nicer.http://www.limepic.com/img/chucky.jpg
and they had party favors and this happy couple could not have been more pleasedhttp://www.limepic.com/img/chuckcocaine.jpghttp://www.limepic.com/img/funnycreepycouple.jpg

MadMel
07-15-2011, 10:37 AM
Mr Drinky has probably hit on the "best" answer to this problem that has been present since like forever. however, I think what prompted the ban was the general "to hell with it" attitude that most parents with not so well behaved kids take with regards to discipline...

AnxiousCowboy
07-15-2011, 10:53 AM
I work in a fine dining restaurant and we have a similar policy. We have, however, bent the rules on many occasions....... I always know when I see "buttered pasta" show up on a ****** dupe.... Seriously? you're bringing a little kid to an oldschool classic french restaurant who can only stomach buttered pasta?

mr drinky
07-17-2011, 11:34 PM
So my outing with my 6-month-old went well. The couple next to us complimented us on how well behaved the little one was. I took her out of the restaurant one time, however, to change the scenery when I could see things might deteriorate.

The restaurant was fabulous too. It was a semi-finalist for the James Beard best restaurant 2011.

Here were some highlights:
* Sweetbread agnolotti with pretzels, mustard and radishes
* Berkshire pork tongue with house made sauerkraut, salt pork, potato and rye bread
* Duck fat fried duck egg with house made ramp and asparagus kimchee and miso paste
* Broiled swordfish belly with yuba knot, hon shimeji mushrooms, spring onion and tofu puree
* Veal chuck roast with king crab, fava beans and spinach

And my baby had 6 ounces of milk ;)

k.

SpikeC
07-17-2011, 11:56 PM
Yowza! No buttered noodles??

Eamon Burke
07-18-2011, 05:09 PM
That's what I'm talking about, Drinky.

My daughter(2yrs) eats what we eat. She hates onions and shrimp, but she always tries them(sometimes after spitting at us a little).

At the sushi bar, we had customers who would bring their kids in when they are little, and then when they are like 10-13, they are leaning over saying "Oo, mommy, can we have the Toro Sashimi?" and "They have Mirugai, daddy!". Good parents.

mano
07-20-2011, 01:06 PM
When our kids were younger we took them out all the time to kid friendly places including sushi bars.

But even then the moment they cried, whined, screeched or did anything that might bother another patron, one of us took the kid outside until they settled down. We had it arranged ahead of time whose turn it was. I remember comforting my baby daughter outside for 15 minutes while my wife enjoyed her lobster!

Kids are going to act like kids inside a restaurant or outside. They don't know the difference but the paying customers do.

BertMor
07-21-2011, 02:39 PM
Its not so much the kids that are the problem, its the parents. It is they who decide whether to allow their children's behavior affect others. One of my pet peeves is the ultra sonic shrieking that parents find so soothing.

Yo Parents your freaking kids are bothering everyone in the room... Take em outside dammmmmit!

monty
07-21-2011, 03:01 PM
I've actually gone up to parents that had well behaved small kids and complemented them. I know it makes them feel good and I glad I did it. Families with noisy kids, I just let them slide.

I can't tell you how helpful this is for parents. This has happened to us a few times and we remind the kids before we enter restaurants how much people appreciate it when they behave - and remind them about the times when people have told them they are well behaved. It makes them proud - and us ,too! Good on you!!!

monty
07-21-2011, 03:02 PM
I'll continue to take my kids wherever it pleases me to take them. If folks around me appear agitated, I encourage my kids to talk louder and, if need be, throw their food. When they were younger I took great delight in changing their diapers on the table. When people stomped away because of the smell I always felt like I had essentially marked my territory. Felt good!

O.K., maybe I haven't done those things - but my kids mean more to me than anyone else in the world, and if I want them to join me for a nice dinner the last thing I'm worried about is if some fool doesn't like a little commotion. And for "chefs" who don't appreciate "dumbing down" the order because my kid can't handle spicy food: just put what we asked for on the plate, and I'll pay the restaurant 10 times what it's worth. That way we are both happy. (maybe that was a bit over the top...)

Eamon Burke
07-21-2011, 06:39 PM
(maybe that was a bit over the top...)

:plus1:

monty
07-21-2011, 09:54 PM
:plus1:

You're right. I was going to edit it out but I don't have that feature...

mano
07-22-2011, 12:02 AM
I'll continue to take my kids wherever it pleases me to take them. If folks around me appear agitated, I encourage my kids to talk louder and, if need be, throw their food. When they were younger I took great delight in changing their diapers on the table. When people stomped away because of the smell I always felt like I had essentially marked my territory. Felt good!

O.K., maybe I haven't done those things - but my kids mean more to me than anyone else in the world, and if I want them to join me for a nice dinner the last thing I'm worried about is if some fool doesn't like a little commotion. And for "chefs" who don't appreciate "dumbing down" the order because my kid can't handle spicy food: just put what we asked for on the plate, and I'll pay the restaurant 10 times what it's worth. That way we are both happy. (maybe that was a bit over the top...)

It'll be interesting to see if they grow up to be mature adults with a a respect for others and the ability to take responsibility for their actions.

BertMor
07-22-2011, 10:05 AM
I'll continue to take my kids wherever it pleases me to take them. If folks around me appear agitated, I encourage my kids to talk louder and, if need be, throw their food. When they were younger I took great delight in changing their diapers on the table. When people stomped away because of the smell I always felt like I had essentially marked my territory. Felt good!

O.K., maybe I haven't done those things - but my kids mean more to me than anyone else in the world, and if I want them to join me for a nice dinner the last thing I'm worried about is if some fool doesn't like a little commotion. And for "chefs" who don't appreciate "dumbing down" the order because my kid can't handle spicy food: just put what we asked for on the plate, and I'll pay the restaurant 10 times what it's worth. That way we are both happy. (maybe that was a bit over the top...)

You belong at McDonalds. I find your attitude typical of 21st century "I'm entitled" attitude. I pay good money just like you do. I am just as entitled to have a pleasant carefree meal. You have NO right to disturb my meal just because you are an incompetent parent who does not know how to teach your child right from wrong and how to be a good citizen. Should you be eating a meal in a restaurant that I am at, & your kids act up, maybe I should take a dump on your table and let your kids get dysentary.

ecchef
07-22-2011, 10:47 AM
I've seen dogs at restaurants (outdoor seating of course) that behaved better than some children.

There as absolutely no reason for any parent to let their kids run amok wherever and whenever they chose. And you're right, these kids will grow up with the same F-you attitude as the morons that raised them. They'll talk loudly on their cell phones in the 'quiet car' of the train, or at a performance or movie. They'll take up 2 parking spaces or park in the 'handicapped only' space with their institutionalized moms hang tag. Or sue everybody because their life is so unfulfilling, but it can't possibly be their fault because pattern their whole existance after some dick on Jersey Shore.

I guess it's time to up the meds.:mad3:

MadMel
07-22-2011, 11:30 AM
So on the whole, it seems more like an adult problem rather then a child problem no?? If the kids are taught proper table manners and etiquette, I for one wouldn't mind having them in the restaurant. The point is to be considerate, and gracious and that is where proper upbringing makes a big difference.. I've given complimentary desserts to children who are well behaved when I worked as a waiter... I think it reinforces the idea that "hey, being nice brings rewards!!"

BertMor
07-22-2011, 12:35 PM
This just an example of what I witnessed on Sunday night. We are at a family Italian restaurant. At the next table there are 4 adults and three children the adults at one end, children at the other. the youngest boy, around 6, starts banging on the older boy around 9 with some plastic toy. And it wasn't love taps. Of course a load fitght breaks out. The adults didn't even notice or pay attention to the load screaming. Sure made MY dinner pleasant. Thanks folks I'm glad you had a good time at my expense.

At another table there was a part of 10-12, celebrating a 1 year old first birthday. Hyper sonic screetching, loud screaming cries, 3 year olds running around, and they even closed off one table (losing revenue).
And you are telling me that banning children is somehow demonic? I think we should rephrase; we aren't banning children, we are banning inconsiderate, lazy, incompetent parents. the kids just come along as baggage. ITS THE PARENTS THAT NEED TO BE BANNED.

monty
07-22-2011, 01:14 PM
delete. I was just being mean.

monty
07-22-2011, 01:18 PM
You belong at McDonalds. I find your attitude typical of 21st century "I'm entitled" attitude. I pay good money just like you do. I am just as entitled to have a pleasant carefree meal. You have NO right to disturb my meal just because you are an incompetent parent who does not know how to teach your child right from wrong and how to be a good citizen. Should you be eating a meal in a restaurant that I am at, & your kids act up, maybe I should take a dump on your table and let your kids get dysentary.

You missed my point - and I couldn't care less. You belong at Old Country Buffet. There won't be any kids there to bother you! :tooth:

monty
07-22-2011, 01:20 PM
It'll be interesting to see if they grow up to be mature adults with a a respect for others and the ability to take responsibility for their actions.

I can tell you this, they will sure as heck know what the word facetious means! I've got good kids, and I'm a good parent. Disagreeing with you doesn't change that.

mano
07-22-2011, 02:53 PM
I can tell you this, they will sure as heck know what the word facetious means! I've got good kids, and I'm a good parent. Disagreeing with you doesn't change that.

Ah, so you're just being a troll.

SpikeC
07-22-2011, 03:18 PM
He was kidding!! There is no need to keep poking!

monty
07-22-2011, 04:11 PM
Ah, so you're just being a troll.

Nope. There was a point in there somewhere. I guess it got lost in translation. My bad. I suppose the @$$hole tone I took didn't help me make my point. Lesson learned.

mano
07-22-2011, 04:19 PM
If you're not trolling and are the least bit serious about what you said your tone is the least of your troubles.

I wish you and your kids all the luck in the world.

bye

BertMor
07-22-2011, 04:24 PM
Ah, so you're just being a troll.

He is, he just doesn't see it. And frankly since you have taken that tone, YOU take them to Old Country Buffet, I will continue to cook my 2 Michelin star food and enjoy.....

Eamon Burke
07-22-2011, 04:26 PM
I got it, you were just trying to emulate the position that your kids and raising them are 1000% more important to you than any of the other people in the building. I can relate to that. I think it's absurd that people think that parents need to bend over backward being considerate of the continuous pleasure cruise that is life without toddlers. Being a parent is a gigantic pain in the ass, and if someone is parenting their kids, even through ignoring a tantrum, people should respect their role. They are busy teaching a new generation how to behave.

When I was a kid, I stole a stick of gum, and my dad found out. He marched me back into the store, and ordered me to give it back and apologize. I was blubbering and doing the ugly cry, I was so embarrassed and ashamed. The clerk felt great pity and said,"Ooooh, it's ok....it's just 25 cents. He can keep it." My dad was so irritated, he was trying to teach me not to shoplift when all that is needed is to have a little kid cry and say he's sorry. Try getting a 17 year old to stop shoplifting. People gotta cooperate with parents--you may be having a good time, but they are on the job, and its a job that affects everyone directly(cause a bratty, rude toddler will someday be a traffic cop, insurance agent, or your neighbor).

The parental instinct to protect our offspring is fundamental to the success of the human race. Monty's instincts were clearly agitated, that's all.

SpikeC
07-22-2011, 04:34 PM
If only all parents were on the job.

Seb
07-22-2011, 09:09 PM
Our local Malaysian restaurant has a sign up that reads the parents of kids who cause a mess (I assume this means throwing food on the floor and knocking dishes off the table during horseplay) will be subject to a surcharge of $15 for the trouble.

Our three-and-a-half-year-old has always been perfect at restaurants, he loves the experience and will not play up unless he is overtired - and that's not his fault, it's ours for failing to manage it. On the rare occasions that he does play up I ask if he wants to wait in the car, and that usually works.

We did have a lot of trouble however on the second leg of the plane trip back from the UK a year and a half ago which was Seoul-Sydney with three hour stopover, boy did that suck! He screamed his head off the entire 10 hour trip and we were too exhausted to cope. No one messed with us though except for one glare which that person wisely did not direct at me or while I was looking. I don't take any crap from other people for my kid being a kid because we do try our best and we are thoughtful people. My stock response is 'if you can't handle screaming kids on a plane, don't fly cattle class, d1ckhead!'.

goodchef1
07-23-2011, 12:49 PM
I have fond respect for parents that stick together for their kids sake, or raise them for that matter. It's a tough job. It's those that treat them like excess baggage, mistreat, or neglect them as if they were a little more then a burden, to those people, I point to myself and tell them "this is how they will turn out".
(Just kidding Mom and Dad) Man, don't let me start on casey anthony.

tk59
07-23-2011, 01:21 PM
I've been resisting putting in my two cents here because reading this thread raises my blood pressure so I can feel my head throbbing. I have two kids. The smallest one is about one and a half. They are both very well behaved although the do tend to make a bit of a mess. I try to clean up as much as possible and leave a generous tip. If my wife is with me and a kid gets fidgety, one of us will go outside to play for a few minutes. Despite my best efforts, my little one either whispers or screams. He has no normal speaking volume. Basically, we get a scream every few minutes during a meal. He's not upset that's just how he is and it isn't just mealtime, either. I used to be embarrassed by this. Now, I do my best to deal with him and try not to go where we're not welcome. (Unfortunately, that isn't always a viable option.) I wouldn't put up with people being mean to my kids but luckily, I haven't ever had to deal with that. Otherwise, I'd probably be in jail.

mano
07-23-2011, 03:20 PM
What stumps me is the "us vs. them" perception of some of the parents here, and elsewhere.

Of course parents should protect their children if they need protection, but I didn't see any mention here or in any of the articles about anyone treating children poorly or being mean to them.

In fact, the restaurant owner said, There’s "nothing wrong with babies,but the fact is you can't control their volume." He said all that screaming and crying disturbs many of his customers. "You know, their child -- maybe as it should be -- is the center of their universe. But they don't realize it's not the center of the universe."

That's a reasonable man not condemning or blaming kids for acting like kids.

The thing is, kids couldn't care less where they eat; it's the parents of the kids who are pissed because their under 6 yr. old kids are banned. It's a shame quiet kids' parents have to suffer because other children's parents allow their loud ones to stay but that's why rules are set up most of the time.

El Pescador
07-23-2011, 03:52 PM
I'll let you in on a secret. People with kids spend less in a restaurant than those without. In the nicer restaurants I have worked we try and keep the people who spend money happy. I know, you spend money but you're an exception. I can't serve full portions or wine/spirits/beer to your child. This is how I make money. I don't care if you tell your friends, because they have kids and don't spend money either. Again, this is how I make money. This is why ALL of the nicer restaurants I've run didn't seat parties w kids between 7-9pm. Its one more thing I could control to make a better dining experience.

tk59
07-23-2011, 05:46 PM
Why do you think that's a secret? I thought everybody knows the profit is in the drinks. That goes for all restaurants down to McDonalds. A cup of soda is basically free and they charge a couple bucks. That's highway robbery, lol.

Seb
07-23-2011, 07:48 PM
In Sydney, two sodas and a bucket of popcorn at the movies costs $20. Two adults plus one child = $60 incl drinks and popcorn. Now THAT's highway robbery.

It's probably cultural difference, but Australian restaurants don't normally ban or refuse to serve children, but the waiting staff in the snootier joints will sometimes choose to get the message across by being extremely ****** towards you. Of course, tipping is not mandatory here.

ecchef
07-23-2011, 09:38 PM
So on the whole, it seems more like an adult problem rather then a child problem no?? If the kids are taught proper table manners and etiquette, I for one wouldn't mind having them in the restaurant. The point is to be considerate, and gracious and that is where proper upbringing makes a big difference.. I've given complimentary desserts to children who are well behaved when I worked as a waiter... I think it reinforces the idea that "hey, being nice brings rewards!!"

Spot on, Mel!

And for everyone who refers to child rearing as a 'tough job', this was something you chose to undertake. My job is tough too, but if continually f it up I'll get fired, and everyone else won't have to pay the price for my mistakes.

mr drinky
07-24-2011, 01:02 AM
Well, I just took my 7 year old to a U2 concert outdoors. Bad move. It was too loud and pouring rain. She is going to hate me until she thinks it was cool -- if that ever happens. That's parenting: constant reminders of how wrong we can be.

k.

steeley
07-24-2011, 01:49 AM
This is the only baby i won't allow
adults can act just as stupid and leave big messes ........
in there diaper.http://www.limepic.com/img/indexwzw.jpg

El Pescador
07-24-2011, 03:34 AM
Why do you think that's a secret? I thought everybody knows the profit is in the drinks. That goes for all restaurants down to McDonalds. A cup of soda is basically free and they charge a couple bucks. That's highway robbery, lol.



You know "bam-bam" and "Dorothy" could do whatever and I'd be okay with them...

Shepherd
07-27-2011, 02:55 PM
Wow, quite a subject. I've rewritten my post about 4x now, trying to make sure it doesn't sound like I hate children.
My wife and I have no children, but raising them (and staying married) looks like one of the hardest things a couple can do. That said, nothing reflects more on the the parents than having a well mannered child. I'm starting to think that people simply aren't teaching children manners anymore because they feel it's too "difficult".
I understand babies crying, most parents will take them outside/away from the other diners. The ones that I'm seeing are the children from 4-6 years old that their parents let them run around disturbing other tabels, yelling, throwing things, sitting at the bar, etc. I realize kids will be kids, I'm talking about the children who seem to be IGNORED by their parents . Those are the people who've driven resturaunt owners to ban children. As a parent if you can't or decide not to keep your children under control, expect to get asked to leave.
When we're out having dinner and a persons child is raising havok I have no problem asking you to kindly keep them at your table or take them outside to play. From there it's up to the parent what kind of example they would like to set for their children.
On the flip side of that, I saw a young boy in a resturaunt with a ton of energy- he was being a kid ( i think he was about 5-6 years old) and should have been allowed to go outside and burn off some energy. Well, insted his father decided to smack his son the the back of the head. I excused myself from the table, walked over to the father and explained that while I understand he can dicipline his child however he sees fit, he should do it in private. I also explained that smacking his child in the head, in public is demeaning and abusive and if he continued I would let him expierience it himself.
Children with manners and courtesy are fantastic and their parents sould be proud.

steeley
07-28-2011, 03:50 AM
[img]http://www.limepic.com/img/998.jpg[/IMG

Dave Martell
07-29-2011, 10:42 PM
Good thing I have no money to go out to eat because after reading this thread I'm never going to take my kids out to a restaurant again. :D

mr drinky
07-29-2011, 11:56 PM
Is this because of all those mokume bolsters that you don't have cash :)

Btw, when I took my 6 month old to that restaurant, it was odd. The restaurant turned out to be the perfect place to do it. About a third of the people were suspect and you could see they were expecting a meltdown, another third were complimentary and said the kid was well behaved, and the other third were inspired thinking they just might be able to keep on going to good restaurants when they finally have kids. It was a small room with only 11 tables, so it was fairly easy to get a read on the people -- more or less.

k.

Edgy Guy
08-01-2011, 01:17 AM
I don't see what's wrong with serving small children in fine restaurants.

With fava beans a nice Chianti, those tender little livers can be faaaaabulous!

dough
08-03-2011, 03:40 PM
nothing is wrong with serving anybody and in fact i bet most fine dining charge more or enough it doesnt matter what the kid orders... if its a real meal great.. if its just buttered noodle fine the upcharge makes it worthwhile. this is not a question of food but a question of behavior and how people behave and how both sides the parent and the restaurant deal with the situation.

jaybett
08-03-2011, 11:07 PM
Another interesting article in the Wall Street Journal, this one about restaurants trying to attract parents with children. Some restaurants are making purees off of items on their menus.

One of the restaurants mentioned in the article noted that it was a challenge to set up a family friendly environment. In the evening if a child had a melt down, then they would send drinks to all the tables.

Jay

ecchef
08-04-2011, 04:18 AM
If they have a big enough VCM, they could probably puree annoying children. Then feed them to the parents.

As far as the second situation is concerned, why don't they just promote a 'screaming child night' and level the playing field? Then they wouldn't have to comp anything!
Carpet cleaning costs may be prohibitive, though. :scratchhead:

JanusInTheGarden
08-05-2011, 01:01 AM
As far as the second situation is concerned, why don't they just promote a 'screaming child night' and level the playing field? Then they wouldn't have to comp anything!
Carpet cleaning costs may be prohibitive, though. :scratchhead:

Isn't that the Chuck E Cheese business model?

Dave Martell
08-05-2011, 01:25 AM
I went to Chuck E Cheese one time when my (now 24 yr old) nephew was only about 8 or so yrs old and I swore that I'd never step foot in one of those places again. Thankfully they served beer at the time so I was able to go the distance but now that's no longer available - forget about it - what a hellhole!

steeley
08-05-2011, 01:38 AM
[QUOTE=ecchef


As far as the second situation is concerned, why don't they just promote a 'screaming child night' and level the playing field? Then they wouldn't have to comp anything!
Carpet cleaning costs may be prohibitive, though. :scratchhead:[/QUOTE]


That's called happy hour.