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Marko Tsourkan
07-27-2011, 01:46 PM
Hey Folks,

I got two people contacted me in the part several days to get in on the list for purchasing 260mm gyuto in 52100. Though I don't like to rush with anything, I spent this entire month experimenting with heat treatment (testing for toughness, edge retention, sharpen-ability, hardness, etc) and grinding, At the moment, one of my knives in being tested and so far a feedback has been encouraging. I have used one knife I made in my kitchen without resharpening or re-touching for more than two weeks now and the edge is holding pretty well.
So, I think I have gotten enough to start and I will adjust as necessary.

I would like to do following things. I am working on a pass-around gyuto in 52100, so you will get an idea on geometry, grind, heat treatment, and F&F.

I also will start a list for preorders for 260mm gyuto in 52100. The finished knife will be 61RC, and I will weigh under 220g with handle. This will be essentially a custom knife, as all processes are done in house by me, including a 6 or 8 step heat treatment. You will be able to make requests for minor profile, thinness, and geometry adjustments, handle type (octagonal or meiji like) and handle material. Price will include a poplar saya (I will prorate if requested without). Also, all knives will come with 100% satisfaction guarantee, should they not meet your expectation, as long as your return them condition received. I will address any issues related to workmanship.

Shortly thereafter, I will offer pre-orders for 280mm suji in 52100. I am working on a prototype, so I haven't finalized the profile or geometry yet, but that should not take long. There will be a pass around for this knife as well.

I will introduce a few more steels options at a later time.


Prices will be available on my web site shortly. In the mean time, you can contact me via PM.


Price includes shipping.

Thank you,
Marko

PS: these will not interfere with my backlog of custom orders. I am clearing them slowly, but should be done very soon.

mhlee
07-27-2011, 02:32 PM
AWESOME!!!!

oivind_dahle
07-27-2011, 03:49 PM
+1

Marko Tsourkan
07-27-2011, 06:17 PM
Thanks for those of you who contacted me. It's very exciting to finally do it.

I am going to start looking in my wood stash to see what I come up with for handles. I have to order some more ironwood, but I have a good amount of really nice maple, koa and walnut burl that I am to resaw and send out for stabilizing.

M

oivind_dahle
07-28-2011, 11:00 AM
I just love Koa!
But I also love Maple Burl :)

Will you post pic so we can pick our own woods, Tiger?

Darkhoek
08-07-2011, 05:40 AM
Very nice to see that you are up and running and ready for production, Marko. Knowing what perfectionist you are in all details on what you make, my guess will be that your HT of the 52100 will be on par with the very very best around. You just can't quit until it's perfect, can you? :D I believe that is a very good thing. Good luck on your great endeavour, Marko. (Just like you were needing that...). I know for sure that you will be making a lot of very happy customers. Hope to be one of them soon :)

DarKHOeK

Marko Tsourkan
08-07-2011, 10:38 AM
Thanks Harald.

Now that I am in this thread, here is a quick run-down where I stand with the pre-orders

I finalized a heat treatment method #1 that resulted in a very stable edge that is easy to sharpen and has excellent edge retention (one of my knives has been used in a pro kitchen since July 25 and has not needed resharpening, just one retouching on leather loaded with 2 micron silicon carbide and the edge came back to shaving condition)

I am also working on a heat treatment process #2 that would retain a stable edge, easy sharpen-ability but would increase edge retention. So far the indications have been that the heat treatment is on target, but I wouldn't know it for certain until the knife has been tested in a pro kitchen as well as on a rope-cutting test. So #2 is on hold for now.

I finalized profile, geometry and finish for the gyuto and working on a suji (two lengths), 150mm petty and 180mm gyuto.

I like to keep the weight of the 260mm (on the edge) gyuto under 225g with the handle so it is light and nimble. At the same time, it is over 3mm thick at the handle, and 1mm .75" from the tip, so it's a pretty rigid knife. I will grind a suji with more flex near the tip, but a gyuto (unless requested) will have very little or no flex near the tip and ZERO flex at the handle.

Finish is going to be similar to Shigefusa kasumi line with horizontal finish lines, rounded choil and spine.

Grind will be shallow convex with thickness above the edge under .010. This is more of a Carter-like than Shigefusa-like grind, but I think it will complement the lightweight of the knife well. It should cut well. I am also considering doing an asymmetric grind (for right hand users first and then maybe left), but would need a feedback before offering it as an option. I am sending one out to evaluate fit, finish, grind (includes asymmetric) early next week.
,
I grind to about .015 at the edge and then take to stones and remove the rest by hand. I have a better control over the angle, and though it takes much longer than on a grinder, I like the result better. I think this is what puts Shigefusa apart from many Japanese makers - no over-grinds, uniform bevels, etc., and I will try to replicate that. There is a learning curve to this, but I am in for a long haul, I hope.

As far as sharpening is concerned, I converge two planes to zero degree and then put a small micro bevel and polish it. I use a mix of synthetic and natural stones, but the resulting edge should be over 6K. If you like wider bevels, you will welcome to put on your own. :)

Working on D handle. A little bit of a learning curve, but should get good results within day or two. Octagonal doesn't need any improvement, I think.

Logo is finalized and will order stensils today, so will get them by then end lf the week. I have the etching machine already.

I will start working on a pass-around knife withing a week or so (still getting feedback). I feel pretty confident about my HT and the rest, so if the brave ones of you want me to start working on your knives before the reviews, please let me know.


Here are the pictures of a knife I am sending it for evaluation for grind, fit and finish (as well as sharpen-ability and edge retention). This was an experimental grind (an asymmetric grind) and experimental heat treatment, and it is a bit narrower than a standard (learning experience). In any event, this is a practice knife for testing processes and I accomplished that.

M

1345

1346

1347

1348

1349

1350

1351

1352

tk59
08-07-2011, 10:49 AM
It took me a second to figure out what I was looking at on number 6. Very nice and I like the logo, too!

so_sleepy
08-07-2011, 11:10 AM
I like the looks of this narrow gyuto. What are the dimensions, heel height and edge length?

Pensacola Tiger
08-07-2011, 11:16 AM
Very nice, Marko, very nice.

Marko Tsourkan
08-07-2011, 11:17 AM
I like the looks of this narrow gyuto. What are the dimensions, heel height and edge length?

It's about 260mm on the edge (274mm or so tip to handle). Height is 48mm while a standard gyuto would be 54-55 or so, this one is considerably narrower.

The blade without handle weighs 140g, and that is before thinning the tang. I expect it to be under 220g with handle.

UglyJoe
08-07-2011, 11:40 AM
LOVE this knife.

Marko Tsourkan
08-07-2011, 11:51 AM
I hope you won't hate the ones I will start making for sale. :)

oivind_dahle
08-07-2011, 01:51 PM
I am impressed!
As you know Im a huge fan of your work!
Looking forward to knives from you :)

Mattias504
08-07-2011, 05:53 PM
Holy F-bomb. That looks awesome....

Marko Tsourkan
08-07-2011, 08:23 PM
Holy F-bomb. That looks awesome....

Between profiling, heat treating, grinding, hand finishing, sharpening and handle making it will be two full days, so I suppose it is better be good, or I need to do something else.

M

mr drinky
08-07-2011, 08:52 PM
Holy Jeebus that is amazing.

k.

lancep
08-07-2011, 09:34 PM
Marko:

I sent you a PM last week regarding this thread. Can you indicate whether you received it.

The knives are looking nice.

Lance

jmforge
08-07-2011, 10:04 PM
Marko, do you bevel the knife all the back to the tip of the tang on the Japanese style knives like they do on Japanese swords or is there a plunge line there somewhere that I can't see?>
Thanks Harald.

Now that I am in this thread, here is a quick run-down where I stand with the pre-orders

I finalized a heat treatment method #1 that resulted in a very stable edge that is easy to sharpen and has excellent edge retention (one of my knives has been used in a pro kitchen since July 25 and has not needed resharpening, just one retouching on leather loaded with 2 micron silicon carbide and the edge came back to shaving condition)

I am also working on a heat treatment process #2 that would retain a stable edge, easy sharpen-ability but would increase edge retention. So far the indications have been that the heat treatment is on target, but I wouldn't know it for certain until the knife has been tested in a pro kitchen as well as on a rope-cutting test. So #2 is on hold for now.

I finalized profile, geometry and finish for the gyuto and working on a suji (two lengths), 150mm petty and 180mm gyuto.

I like to keep the weight of the 260mm (on the edge) gyuto under 225g with the handle so it is light and nimble. At the same time, it is over 3mm thick at the handle, and 1mm .75" from the tip, so it's a pretty rigid knife. I will grind a suji with more flex near the tip, but a gyuto (unless requested) will have very little or no flex near the tip and ZERO flex at the handle.

Finish is going to be similar to Shigefusa kasumi line with horizontal finish lines, rounded choil and spine.

Grind will be shallow convex with thickness above the edge under .010. This is more of a Carter-like than Shigefusa-like grind, but I think it will complement the lightweight of the knife well. It should cut well. I am also considering doing an asymmetric grind (for right hand users first and then maybe left), but would need a feedback before offering it as an option. I am sending one out to evaluate fit, finish, grind (includes asymmetric) early next week.
,
I grind to about .015 at the edge and then take to stones and remove the rest by hand. I have a better control over the angle, and though it takes much longer than on a grinder, I like the result better. I think this is what puts Shigefusa apart from many Japanese makers - no over-grinds, uniform bevels, etc., and I will try to replicate that. There is a learning curve to this, but I am in for a long haul, I hope.

As far as sharpening is concerned, I converge two planes to zero degree and then put a small micro bevel and polish it. I use a mix of synthetic and natural stones, but the resulting edge should be over 6K. If you like wider bevels, you will welcome to put on your own. :)

Working on D handle. A little bit of a learning curve, but should get good results within day or two. Octagonal doesn't need any improvement, I think.

Logo is finalized and will order stensils today, so will get them by then end lf the week. I have the etching machine already.

I will start working on a pass-around knife withing a week or so (still getting feedback). I feel pretty confident about my HT and the rest, so if the brave ones of you want me to start working on your knives before the reviews, please let me know.


Here are the pictures of a knife I am sending it for evaluation for grind, fit and finish (as well as sharpen-ability and edge retention). This was an experimental grind (an asymmetric grind) and experimental heat treatment, and it is a bit narrower than a standard (learning experience). In any event, this is a practice knife for testing processes and I accomplished that.

M

1345

1346

1347

1348

1349

1350

1351

1352

JohnnyChance
08-08-2011, 12:45 AM
Marko, do you bevel the knife all the back to the tip of the tang on the Japanese style knives like they do on Japanese swords or is there a plunge line there somewhere that I can't see?>

No plunge line. It is a 50/50 double bevel knife, the edge is ground on both sides. Not like a traditional single bevel japanese knife, with a hollow back.

Unless I am misunderstanding what you are asking, which is also possible.

jmforge
08-08-2011, 02:55 AM
Nihonto are beveled on both sides all the way back to the end of the tang. There is no plunge line at the tsuba, just a continuous set of bevels. the blades are notched in at the tsuba much like the Japanese kitchen knives are notched where they go into the handle. What I am asking is if the tang on these knives os rectangular or trapezoidal in shape for lack of a better way of describing it.
No plunge line. It is a 50/50 double bevel knife, the edge is ground on both sides. Not like a traditional single bevel japanese knife, with a hollow back.

Unless I am misunderstanding what you are asking, which is also possible.

Dave Martell
08-08-2011, 03:09 AM
Using plunge lines is an American knifemaker thing, Marko is doing the knives more like the Japanese way so I doubt that there's a plunge line or if there was it was ground away.

Marko Tsourkan
08-08-2011, 12:19 PM
That is correct. I think a plunge line if wouldn't get in a way of a pinch grip, then would be very noticeable to the user, so I have never considered using it. Most larger knives are held with a pinch grip.

I grind 50/50 but I am considering to do an asymetric grind, if it could improve performance.

M

Justin0505
08-12-2011, 01:20 AM
Exciting, exciting stuff.
I've noticed a certain clean, focused aesthetic to all of your work; a style that makes it very unmistakably "Marko."
If, having never seen a blade designed by you, someone showed me a lineup and 6 photos and said "pick the Tsourkan" it would have taken me all of 5 seconds to pick that beautiful, dramatic, but also minimalist sliver of steel out as yours.

I certainly don't NEED another gyuto, but I will buy this one without hesitation.

heirkb
08-12-2011, 02:36 AM
That knife looks really nice, Marko. I think I'll have to save up for one of your knives. What size suji's are you making?

Marko Tsourkan
08-12-2011, 08:46 AM
The practice suji (2) are 280mm on the edge and 295mm tip to handle. One can select any size.

AnxiousCowboy
08-14-2011, 03:42 AM
mmmm, suji.

MadMel
08-14-2011, 04:19 AM
mmmm, suji.

+1

Hope I get a job once I get to Aus...

Marko Tsourkan
08-14-2011, 01:08 PM
I tried my hand at grinding a sujihiki. This was a test-grind to try the process and identify areas where I need to improve. I think the knife came out all right. For the final version, I need to tune up a profile a bit and add a little bit of thickness at the spine (it's about 2.4mm now, but I would like it to be around 3mm for extra rigidity).

It was more difficult to grind a suji than a gyuto. I think it has to do with suji being a thinner and less tall a blade.

For comparison purposes (profile and geometry), I placed it side-by-side with Shigefusa. Feedback is always welcome.

52100. 110g (w/out a handle). Experimental heat treatment to maximize edge retention while preserving edge stability. In the end of August, me and another forum member will test several steels with several heat treatments for edge retention in a rope cutting test. Until then, this heat treatment is not offered.

PS: in picture #5 from the top the choil shot of Shigefusa geometry looks much thinner than on mine suji, but in reality there is not much of a difference. Shigefusa rounds the choil area at a steeper angle so the chamfer on the inside of the choil makes it look like Shigefusa geometry is much thinner.


1451

1452

1453

1454

1455

1456

jmforge
08-14-2011, 01:35 PM
Okay, question answered. The Shigefusa appears to have a "plunge" like you would find on an integral. It is just VERY shallow and ground all the way up to the machi.

dmccurtis
08-14-2011, 02:19 PM
I believe what you're seeing is the result of Shigefusa forging to shape, leaving the tang thicker and unground.

jmforge
08-14-2011, 04:31 PM
Probably, but it still answers my question.:biggrin: The transition to the bevels, which I just call the plunge cut for lack of a better term is up at the machi and the tang is not beveled. As the tang is unfinished, I suspect that blade was not intended to have the "machi gap" so you also wouldn't notice the fairly significant stepdown in spine thickness from the tang to the ricasso so much. I like the way that was done. Still a fair amount of meat on the tang and a nice smooth transition to the blade.
I believe what you're seeing is the result of Shigefusa forging to shape, leaving the tang thicker and unground.

Iceman91
08-14-2011, 06:15 PM
Really like how you did the tip on the suji Marko.

Mike

Marko Tsourkan
08-14-2011, 07:51 PM
Probably, but it still answers my question.:biggrin: The transition to the bevels, which I just call the plunge cut for lack of a better term is up at the machi and the tang is not beveled. As the tang is unfinished, I suspect that blade was not intended to have the "machi gap" so you also wouldn't notice the fairly significant stepdown in spine thickness from the tang to the ricasso so much. I like the way that was done. Still a fair amount of meat on the tang and a nice smooth transition to the blade.

It's shaped by hand with a sen and polished by hand.

JohnnyChance
08-15-2011, 12:42 AM
Probably, but it still answers my question.:biggrin: The transition to the bevels, which I just call the plunge cut for lack of a better term is up at the machi and the tang is not beveled. As the tang is unfinished, I suspect that blade was not intended to have the "machi gap" so you also wouldn't notice the fairly significant stepdown in spine thickness from the tang to the ricasso so much. I like the way that was done. Still a fair amount of meat on the tang and a nice smooth transition to the blade.

Well, you decided it had answered your own question. Doesn't mean it was correctly answered.

One thing you have to get away from is shoehorning sword terms onto kitchen knives. They are unnecessary and often inapplicable. Here (http://www.zknives.com/knives/kitchen/misc/jbladeant.shtml) is Gator's chart for knife terminology for single bevel knives. Most of these also apply to double bevel knives.

There is no plunge line/cut on a Shigefusa. "The transition to the bevels" is the entire blade face. Some western makers use plunge lines on kitchen knives, like Delbert or Haslinger. But most double bevel knives, Japanese or North American, the transition is smooth all the way from the edge to the spine as the blade gets thicker. How that transition is ground affects the performance of the knife. That is what we are talking about when we are debating flat grind vs convex vs blended bevels, etc.

Mattias504
08-15-2011, 02:30 AM
Lookin good, Marko.

jmforge
08-15-2011, 03:26 AM
Funny......a number of those terms, are, in fact, the same terms used for swords. Shinogi, kissiki, sori, mune, to name a few. Just like a sen is also the name for a scraper used for shaping swords. My observation was that on that particular knife, they scraped/shaped the bevels all the way up to the handle and left the tang thicker and squared as opposed to continuing the bevels all the way to the end of the tang. That is more analogous to how a western integral knife is ground as opposed to how nihonto are shaped. That's all. Just putting into terms that I am familiar with. Just like I had a little light go off over my head when a figured out that the blended grind actually resembles a saber grind where the shoulder has been rounded over. I guess in Japanese terms, you would say that you smeared the transition between the kiriba and shinogi, right?:wink:
Well, you decided it had answered your own question. Doesn't mean it was correctly answered.

One thing you have to get away from is shoehorning sword terms onto kitchen knives. They are unnecessary and often inapplicable. Here (http://www.zknives.com/knives/kitchen/misc/jbladeant.shtml) is Gator's chart for knife terminology for single bevel knives. Most of these also apply to double bevel knives.

There is no plunge line/cut on a Shigefusa. "The transition to the bevels" is the entire blade face. Some western makers use plunge lines on kitchen knives, like Delbert or Haslinger. But most double bevel knives, Japanese or North American, the transition is smooth all the way from the edge to the spine as the blade gets thicker. How that transition is ground affects the performance of the knife. That is what we are talking about when we are debating flat grind vs convex vs blended bevels, etc.

JohnnyChance
08-15-2011, 03:37 AM
I know some of the terms used on knives are used on swords. I wasn't saying NONE of the terms apply, just some of the ones you have been using do not fit.

As for your observation that they did not continue the bevels onto the tang...that is how it has been on every single tang I have seen. No point in grinding a bevel into something you are going to cover with a handle.

Marko Tsourkan
08-20-2011, 10:50 PM
A quick announcement, folks.

On Monday or Tuesday, I will be sending two sujihiki for a private feedback, followed by a passaround gyuto (the following week). I will be making a list of people for passaround this week.

In the mean time, I would like to start on some knives that were commissioned (for those who don't want to wait for passaround reviews). Heat treatment takes a long time (especially when you do one knife at a time) and making handles and sayas also takes a long time, so I better get a head start, before I get burried under work again.

A profile for a gyoto, and a petty is finalized, a suji should be finalized within days. Heat treatment is finalized, and so is geometry and grind for all these knives. All knives will be hand-rubbed to 600 grit and hand-sharpened to about 3-5K.

So, if this sounds like you would like to get on, please send me an email to marko@markotsourkan.com as
my PM box gets full all the time, so email would be is preferable.

For handle material, I am going to give you an option to choose your own. If you buy a block from Burl Source you will get a discount from Mark and a discount from me. This way, you can pick exactly what you like. Please contact me for details.

Thanks!

M

Marko Tsourkan
08-20-2011, 11:33 PM
A correction:

I am sending out two sujis and one gyuto, in addition to a gyuto I sent our for testing in August. These are to get a quick feedback on performance, profile, geometry, grind, fit and finish and to help me with making a a pass around knife - 275mm gyuto (260mm on the edge).

I will make a list of people I will send the knife to sometimes this week. Stay tuned.

M

JohnnyChance
08-20-2011, 11:47 PM
I like the Burl Source collaboration. Mark has some great stuff. That redwood burl you put on my Shige was from him (I can't remember if I ever told ya that, maybe I did, haha).

Marko Tsourkan
08-20-2011, 11:56 PM
You didn't, but I had no complains about working that block, so I suspected it was stabilized by K&G. Now I know for sure.

JohnnyChance
08-21-2011, 12:02 AM
Yeah, I knew it was K&G or WSSI. I think I have seen some of his pieces are done by WSSI. Maybe not, he can chime in and correct me.

oivind_dahle
08-21-2011, 06:00 AM
I like the Burl Source collaboration. Mark has some great stuff. That redwood burl you put on my Shige was from him (I can't remember if I ever told ya that, maybe I did, haha).

Agree.
I have one from Mark - my Carter
I have one more from Mark when I can find a blade.
And of course lots on my way from Marko with Mark wood. Really looking forward to the handle and mathing saya on our secret project :)

Mattias504
08-21-2011, 12:54 PM
not much of a secret anymore

Marko Tsourkan
08-21-2011, 09:02 PM
not much of a secret anymore

Still a secret. Only I, Oivind and Devin know what that is. :) and nobody is saying a word.

Mattias504
08-21-2011, 09:20 PM
Well, throwing Devin's name in there doesn't help your cause very much...
:)

Marko Tsourkan
08-21-2011, 10:50 PM
but nobody is saying what it is... It's obviously a knife, but what steel, what construction, etc. is a secret until it is finished.

JohnnyChance
08-21-2011, 10:52 PM
It is clearly Oivind's soba-kiri he's been asking for. In Devin damascus and koa saya and handle, natch.

Andrew H
08-21-2011, 11:00 PM
It is clearly Oivind's soba-kiri he's been asking for. In Devin damascus and koa saya and handle, natch.

Haha, I would pay $20 just to see a picture of that knife :lol2:

UglyJoe
08-21-2011, 11:11 PM
And $20 more to see Dave's face when it shows up at his shop to be sharpened...

Marko Tsourkan
08-22-2011, 08:59 AM
Haha, I would pay $20 just to see a picture of that knife :lol2:

Do you think Oivind will last long without posting pictures on the forum? I don't think so. Why pay money when you get to see it for free as soon as Oivind sees it.

M

oivind_dahle
08-22-2011, 09:40 AM
http://d24w6bsrhbeh9d.cloudfront.net/photo/175103_700b.jpg

Guess you all seen my title....

Marko Tsourkan
08-22-2011, 11:18 AM
OOPSS... Oivind just revealed his biggest secret. He is a She! :)

mr drinky
08-22-2011, 12:28 PM
OOPSS... Oivind just revealed his biggest secret. He is a She! :)

Oivind must be drunk again. At least when he drinks he only becomes a lesbian and doesn't end up grinding down a 240 gyuto into a 150 petty.

k.

oivind_dahle
08-22-2011, 02:10 PM
Hehe. To be honest Im really looking forward to what Marko will do.
My experience with Marko is that he always strives to become better. So far I have 3 sayas and 3 handles from him, and I got to tell that I love them.
He is great, now on a journey to become better. I guess Marko will be one of the best kkmakers within a year or two... I regard him as great already :)

tk59
08-22-2011, 02:10 PM
OOPSS... Oivind just revealed his biggest secret. He is a She! :)
No wonder he thinks Carters are perfect knives for women!

Marko Tsourkan
09-25-2011, 12:36 PM
I am one practice knife away from starting working on the orders and passaround knives. !WHEW!

Based on feedback I received, I made some adjustments to the grind and finish. The knife in the picture is one I ground yesterday implementing those changes. It's a second quality (mostly finish), thought perfectly usable. I will grind one today aiming at first quality (as would be all knives for sale), and if everything goes as expected, I will be open for business as of tomorrow. :)

Knife measurements:
3.44mm at the spine at the handle
3mm over the heel on the spine
2mm half the way on the spine
.7mm 10mm from the tip
1.9mm half way down on the heel
.005" on the edge
178g (with ho wood handle. Will probably be 200-220g with a cocobolo handle)
Shallow convex grind.

1781

PS: the gunk on the spine is bees wax I used to seal the tang hole. :)

oivind_dahle
09-25-2011, 02:09 PM
Great news for us that are waiting!

I hope you got my 3 knives ready for xmas! :happymug:

mr drinky
09-25-2011, 02:35 PM
Good news indeed. Can't wait to see the knives flowing out of Westchester County.

k.

Marko Tsourkan
09-25-2011, 02:53 PM
Good news indeed. Can't wait to see the knives flowing out of Westchester County.

k.

Yes, call it moving too slowly or excessive due diligence, but I need to get my act together, if I am to deliver all that were placed by Christmas. Plus I have some custom work orders that I haven't fulfilled yet. :(

M

oivind_dahle
09-25-2011, 03:01 PM
Plus I have some custom work orders that I haven't fulfilled yet. :(


Muhahahahaha!

Get in line suckers!!

Marko Tsourkan
09-25-2011, 03:14 PM
calm down. :)
I meant orders for handles and sayas that I have had for a long time.

echerub
09-25-2011, 03:20 PM
Well, we certainly can't blame Olvind for his enthusiasm ;)

bprescot
09-25-2011, 04:45 PM
Haha! Seriously Oivind, get in line! :wink:

Great news Marko! Looking forward to seeing what you produce!