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vfamily
08-08-2011, 11:00 PM
Hi all.

Totally new here. My wife is the cook in the family, and as such is the main user of the knives. Right now we have a random array of garbage, and her favorite knife is a little knife that looks like a 5.5" Santoku style knife. She is very small (4'11") with very small hands.

I have wanted to get her a real knife for quite awhile, and while we were at the State Fair, saw a Cutco dealer. She tried them out, and really like them. So we bought a Santoku style knife, a cheese knife, and some shears. Total was just under $200.

I normally research everything well before I buy things, but these were for her, and she liked them. Well, I got home, and fired up Google, and read many bad things about Cutco, but some good things as well. But most say I overpaid for the knives. Well, we had a 15 day return policy, so we are returning them. I then learned all about Wusthof, Shun, MAC, Global, Victorinox Forschner, and Kyocera. I was really interested in the Victorinox Forschner because of the price, but I wanted her to try some out.

Most said Sur La Table had a good selection, so we just went there tonight. We looked at 8" chef's knives (too big), 7" Santoku (too big), and 5.5" Santokus (just right). We (She) tried the Global, Shun, Myabi, and Wusthofs. She also tried a Kyocera and a ... forgot the name, but it was a bright color and very cheap (like $10)...Rikon something. She loved loved loved the Myabi Kaizen knife. It wasn't totally outrageous at $120, but still was more than the $30 Forschner. I know she won't like that one compared to the Kaizen.

I have looked at Kaizen info, and it is sparse. Seems like a Sur La Table only model (which I'm leery off). The Sur La Table rep there said they couldn't sharpen it in house since it was ... I think an 11 degree edge.

A couple questions. My wife and I aren't the best at doing the dishes right away, and it might be difficult for us to remember to clean it right away (just being honest). Is it worth getting this good of a knife for us? Is this that good of a knife to begin with? Is it bad that only Sur La Table sells this? I see they have a knife class and after the class you get to keep a Shun 6" knife. Seems like a great deal (seeing as my wife wanted to take the class anyway). Has anyone taken this? Do you think they would let us switch out knives?

My friend says she has some Fiskar knives (which seem not to be sold stateside) and said she loves them because she has left food on them for 24 hours, and they are still sharp and rust free after 8 years. I was thinking ceramic might be the route for us, but unfortunately she liked the Miyabi, and said it was way sharper.

Sorry about the long post and so many questions.

jm2hill
08-08-2011, 11:05 PM
There are some great stainless steel knives out there and you will be getting great recommendations soon.

Post a final price point for the knife and anything else you want and you'll get advice real quick.

Welcome!

Dave Martell
08-08-2011, 11:07 PM
Welcome to KKF v! :)

vfamily
08-08-2011, 11:14 PM
There are some great stainless steel knives out there and you will be getting great recommendations soon.

Post a final price point for the knife and anything else you want and you'll get advice real quick.

Welcome!

$119 - Miyabi Kaizen 5.5 Satoku
http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-184889/Miyabi-Kaizen-Santoku-Knives

vfamily
08-08-2011, 11:15 PM
Welcome to KKF v! :)

Thanks

tk59
08-08-2011, 11:19 PM
Sounds like your wife is into fancy as opposed to performance. If that is the case, the Miyabi should be a good buy. You cannot beat a Forschner for value but those knives don't hold their edge long. Ceramic is too brittle. You can also consider the Gekko line at Japanese Chefs Knife that have the faux-damascus look: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SPECIALS.html. I've used on of these and I found it was a very good performer for the price. If you don't want to sharpen your knives, they will get dull just like any others and we generally recommend whetstones, a professional sharpener with experience with Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Sharpening)/proprietor specializing in Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Imports).

vfamily
08-08-2011, 11:24 PM
Sounds like your wife is into fancy as opposed to performance. If that is the case, the Miyabi should be a good buy. You cannot beat a Forschner for value but those knives don't hold their edge long. Ceramic is too brittle. You can also consider the Gekko line at Japanese Chefs Knife that have the faux-damascus look: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SPECIALS.html. I've used on of these and I found it was a very good performer for the price. If you don't want to sharpen your knives, they will get dull just like any others and we generally recommend whetstones, a professional sharpener with experience with Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Sharpening)/proprietor specializing in Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Imports).

It's funny because I would never describe her that way, but man did she like the look of the Miyabi. But she also said it fit her like a glove, and though the other ones (5.5") were too high up. Not sure what she meant by that though. Normally she is more function over form, but this time I think both were in this knife. You say ceramic is too brittle. Is it true it will hold its edge for 7 years? Because if it breaks in 3 or 4, and is only $50, laying out another $50 for a replacement is still cheaper!

tk59
08-08-2011, 11:38 PM
It's funny because I would never describe her that way, but man did she like the look of the Miyabi. But she also said it fit her like a glove, and though the other ones (5.5") were too high up. Not sure what she meant by that though. Normally she is more function over form, but this time I think both were in this knife. You say ceramic is too brittle. Is it true it will hold its edge for 7 years? Because if it breaks in 3 or 4, and is only $50, laying out another $50 for a replacement is still cheaper! Most people I know break their tips and have other chips in the edge within days. It all depends on how careful you are and it doesn't sound like you're very.

vfamily
08-08-2011, 11:40 PM
Most people I know break their tips and have other chips in the edge within days. It all depends on how careful you are and it doesn't sound like you're very.

Ahh, understood. I would say she is somewhat careful, but not super careful. I think we'll avoid ceramic. Thanks!

vfamily
08-08-2011, 11:41 PM
Sounds like your wife is into fancy as opposed to performance. If that is the case, the Miyabi should be a good buy. You cannot beat a Forschner for value but those knives don't hold their edge long. Ceramic is too brittle. You can also consider the Gekko line at Japanese Chefs Knife that have the faux-damascus look: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SPECIALS.html. I've used on of these and I found it was a very good performer for the price. If you don't want to sharpen your knives, they will get dull just like any others and we generally recommend whetstones, a professional sharpener with experience with Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Sharpening)/proprietor specializing in Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Imports).

Those Gekko JCK INAZUMA are gorgeous. But unfortunately I don't see the 5.5" knife.

tk59
08-08-2011, 11:45 PM
Nope. No 5.5" but these knives are so light, you really have plenty of control at the 8" size. It might just takea little getting used to. I also find a 6" petty very useful. If I had to, I could do just about anything with it.

Sorry, that was a 140 mm or about 5".

vfamily
08-08-2011, 11:47 PM
Nope. No 5.5" but these knives are so light, you really have plenty of control at the 8" size. It might just takea little getting used to. I also find a 6" petty very useful. If I had to, I could do just about anything with it.

Good to know. I think the knife class will help. Also, the one in our area isn't a Shun class, so no free knife. The $100 Shun class gets you a free knife. I think that is a killer deal if your area does it.

vfamily
08-08-2011, 11:58 PM
Nope. No 5.5" but these knives are so light, you really have plenty of control at the 8" size. It might just takea little getting used to. I also find a 6" petty very useful. If I had to, I could do just about anything with it.

Sorry, that was a 140 mm or about 5".

There is the 6" (or 150mm) Petty, which I am guessing is a Chef's knife? But she really likes the style of a Santoku

vfamily
08-09-2011, 12:04 AM
As much as I don't like celebrity endorsed anything, how are the Furi knives with Rachel Ray behind them? This set seems very intriguing to me.

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/furi-pro/rachael-ray-coppertail-stainless-steel-santoku-knife-set-p18583

tk59
08-09-2011, 01:35 AM
A santoku is a chef's knife with a stubby tip. Pointy tips are useful and they experience less drag going through food stuff. If you want to explore some good lower priced options, go for Tojiro or Fujiwara.

oivind_dahle
08-09-2011, 09:38 AM
Buy nice or buy twice.

Go for a Murray Carter High Grade Funayuki
This one: http://www.cartercutlery.com/japanese-knives/new-products/48sun-high-grade-funayuki-ho-woodwater-buffalo-horn-handle
or
This one: http://www.cartercutlery.com/japanese-knives/new-products/51sun-high-grade-funayuki-ho-woodwater-buffalo-horn-handle-0

And you could have it rehandled by Darkhoek or another closer to you:
http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/gallery/56867/1310900808-1.jpg
http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/gallery/56867/1310900825-2.jpg

If money is the important, go for a Torjo DP 180 Gyuto for 70 bucks or go for the 80 dollar Torjo DP 180 Damscus Gyuto that looks awesome ;)

But I recommend the Carter, awesome knife for females. I got one, and Im about to order one more from Carter (and I have ordered one from Marko in 150 and 2 x 180 from Marko as well)

tk59
08-09-2011, 10:05 AM
Agreed. If this is in your budget, it performs like no other. The problem would be the exposed carbon steel core which would rust to hell in no time if left wet. The tips are also somewhat delicate and the handles are burnt in so if that gets soaked a couple times, it will come off or you could have rusting issues inside the handle. The handle is also the cheapest handle around, and I don't just mean inexpensive. It works but that's it.

oivind_dahle
08-09-2011, 10:14 AM
The carter gets a nice patina. I had mine wet for several hours (yeah I was drunk) and no harm, but then again a nice patina had developed already. The patina forms quickly on a carter, and if you are careful you would have a nice patina within a week :)

I also think that if you have a nice knife you will be more careful with it, and you will wipe it clean after use. Just follow some simple rules:
No dishwasher
Wipe dry after use
Was with mild soap and water and wipe off.
Keep it stored safe

A nice rehandle will cost you like 100 bucks. You can also buy a carter on the buy/sell/trade marked. I did and got one for 150 bucks.

No cutting of bones and frozen food.

vfamily
08-09-2011, 12:50 PM
Hmm, the more I am reading these comments, the more I think maybe a "nice" knife isn't for us.

mhlee
08-09-2011, 01:59 PM
+1 to a Carter.

I purchased a 5.4 sun SFGZ White No. 1 Funayuki with a Riveted Handle for my girlfriend. She preferred a small Global santoku before I got this for her and wasn't particularly careful about wiping down knives after using them prior to this knife. This would be about the same size as the Miyabi.

However, she LOVES this knife. In fact, she really enjoys cutting now because this knife is a great cutting knife, light and easy to use. It's probably the best cutting knife that we have. She also now takes extremely good care of it, regularly wiping it down and washing it regularly. There's only minor discoloration at the tip because of the exposed carbon core, but it seems to hold up well even to acidic foods like lemons and limes. The handle doesn't look like much, but it's extremely practical and comfortable. She also really considers how something looks like, but she was fine with the handle.

We purchased it during Carter's last sale - it was roughly the same price as the Miyabi.

WildBoar
08-09-2011, 02:47 PM
When we went to SLT for Kramer's talk a couple months ago, my wife tried a bunch of demo knifes and really liked the Miyabi gyuto -- so she bought one. She uses is a lot, along with a 210 Hiromoto gyuto Dave Martell rehandled for us. The Miyabi is stainless steel, and really won out in her mind against the shorter ZH Kramer and against the Shuns. She telecommutes a couple days a week, and often does a quick lunch prep and leaves knifes laying around wet/ dirty. She knows not to do it with the Hiromoto (carbon steel edge), but she does not have to worry about the Miyabi.

vfamily
08-09-2011, 02:48 PM
When we went to SLT for Kramer's talk a couple months ago, my wife tried a bunch of demo knifes and really liked the Miyabi gyuto -- so she bought one. She uses is a lot, along with a 210 Hiromoto gyuto Dave Martell rehandled for us. The Miyabi is stainless steel, and really won out in her mind against the shorter ZH Kramer and against the Shuns. She telecommutes a couple days a week, and often does a quick lunch prep and leaves knifes laying around wet/ dirty. She knows not to do it with the Hiromoto (carbon steel edge), but she does not have to worry about the Miyabi.

Hmm, and the edge is as sharp as ever? Does she steel them a lot?

WildBoar
08-09-2011, 02:55 PM
She pretty much uses three knives for most of her prep. We've had this one ~2 months, and I have not needed to sharpen it. Still waiting on the JKS stropping kit, so it has not even been stropped, but it easily slid through tomatoes and onions the other night. No steels here -- they are not very friendly to knife edges!

vfamily
08-09-2011, 03:06 PM
She pretty much uses three knives for most of her prep. We've had this one ~2 months, and I have not needed to sharpen it. Still waiting on the JKS stropping kit, so it has not even been stropped, but it easily slid through tomatoes and onions the other night. No steels here -- they are not very friendly to knife edges!

Really? You shouldn't steel a knife?

jm2hill
08-09-2011, 03:27 PM
Really? You shouldn't steel a knife?

Sounds almost right. Honing (steeling) on Steel Rods that are generally to hard on Japanese knives and will chip them. This is because the japanese steel does not roll over as easy as some german steel, allowing it to take a sharper edge.

Steeling (honing) on A ceramic honing rod will work. however:

I'm sure lots of the members here use something called a strop kit. It lets you refine the edge on a piece of leather/wood/newspaper using abrasives.

WildBoar
08-09-2011, 03:35 PM
She got a Miyabi Fusion: http://uncategorized.sendori.com/search?q=surletable.com&s=S7uWfwB9C2ZkyAbG

Steels are pretty course, and can chip the edges of blades that have harder tempers. They may be okay on softer german stainless steel knifes (wusthoffs, etc.), but they can damage the harder steel used on these knives. If you must use a rod, usually a smooth borosilicate or ceramic rod is recommended, but the best is to strop on felt or leather loaded with diamond spray or chromium oxide powder.

There is loads of info/ threads out there about 'steels' and stropping.

WildBoar
08-09-2011, 03:36 PM
whoops -- jm2hill beat me to it! :-)

bprescot
08-09-2011, 04:05 PM
Hi vf,

Sorry I'm replying so late here. The Miyabi's have a pretty solid reputation as good Shun competitors. There are a few here that even prefer them. If your questions is "Is there a better knife out there for the money", well yes. But you'll be making some trade-offs. The Miyabi's have some top-notch finishing. Everything fits just right, is nice and polished, and a lot of attention has been paid to small details. Additionally most find it looks great. Moreover you know your wife likes it. Now, if the questions is "Is there another knife that has all of this for cheaper?" ... probably not. We tend to value function over all else here. So, while we could point you to a better performing knife, you'd probably lose some of that other stuff. Someone here recommended a Tojiro Damascus for instance. Tojiro's cut great, have good steel and this one even has a similar cladding to the Kaizen. But you're not going to get the same level of finish on this knife. Whether that's worth $40 is up to you.

The question of how to keep it sharp, however, does remain. The factory edge on that Miyabi will last a LONG time in a home kitchen, but not forever. There are things you can do to help extend that life (like getting a ceramic rod for honing or rigid strop) but the edge WILL need to be sharpened at some point. This will be true of ANY knife, though, so I don't think it should deter your purchase of the or anything else. My vote would be to keep the wife happy. If she loves the Miyabi then great! It's a fine knife and will put in many years of service.

Amon-Rukh
08-09-2011, 04:26 PM
Hi vfamily!

Based on everything you've said, I think I would echo bprescot's advice and say go with the Miyabi. It's going to be a good knife and you won't have to worry about the fit & finish as you might with cheaper blades nor will you have to be as vigilant about rust dangers as you would with a carbon. Plus, you've already been able to try it out and know that your wife likes it! Finally, Sur La Table has an ultra-lenient return policy, so if you buy the knife and it doesn't turn out to be what you hoped for, you can always take it back and try something else instead!

Eamon Burke
08-09-2011, 04:40 PM
No knife, no matter how cheap, will ever survive a dishwasher. It's not the knife, it's the dishwasher. So you gotta get in the practice of wiping a knife after you are done with it--kitchen towels exist for the same reason as toilet paper. It's cleaner and safer.

I do not recommend anything carbon-steel, because it sounds like you might leave some lemon butter on it at one time or another(that doesn't make you a bad person:wink:). I would suggest that if you are willing to change a few things to take care of the knife, you can go with a stainless like a Tojiro, which is a fairly thin knife for cheap. The finish on it isn't great, but I'm sure you can handle a little sandpaper if it's really bugging you.

Your other option, IMO, is to buy a Victorinox chef's knife and learn to sharpen it. Having a knife that is sharp is more important than having one that is well designed. The problem with these cheaper knives is that they don't let you be lazy--they don't stay sharp for very long at all. Steeling will help soft steel knives like the Victorinox, but they edge will need repair long before harder(read: slightly more brittle) steel like the Tojiro.

So:
Buy a good, stainless knife, and have it professionally maintained about twice a year.
or
Buy a cheap knife like a Victorinox(my favorite beaters), and learn to sharpen it yourself.



No knife will stay sharp forever. Its just not going to happen! But the difference between a Victorinox and a Carter is beyond night and day. They are barely the same tool.

vfamily
08-09-2011, 06:41 PM
Wow, awesome stuff guys. I will have a sit down with my wife today, and find out what she wants to do. I totally get the soft/hard knife thing now. I'll see what she thinks is a good plan. Obviously if I could get away with $30, I would, but if the wife is happy, I really don't think another $90 is going to kill me. If it lasts it was well worth it.

If I do decide on the Miyabi, or any other japanese knife, do you all recommend going to a pro to get it sharpened when it needs it?

mr drinky
08-09-2011, 07:39 PM
Hi vfamily!

Based on everything you've said, I think I would echo bprescot's advice and say go with the Miyabi. It's going to be a good knife and you won't have to worry about the fit & finish as you might with cheaper blades nor will you have to be as vigilant about rust dangers as you would with a carbon. Plus, you've already been able to try it out and know that your wife likes it! Finally, Sur La Table has an ultra-lenient return policy, so if you buy the knife and it doesn't turn out to be what you hoped for, you can always take it back and try something else instead!

My wife saw my Miyabi Birchwood parer that Pensacola Tiger sold me and she loved it immediately. She even said, "Now I know why you like knives so much." I think most chicks would did the Miyabi line.

k.

99Limited
08-09-2011, 07:53 PM
If it was me I'd go for the Miyabi Kaizen 8" chef while it's on sale for $100. I know she likes a shorter knife, but Sur La Table has such a generous return policy your wife could use it for a while to try and get accustomed to the length. If after a month she doesn't like it, take it back and get something else. There's also a 6" chef for more money so if the 8" doesn't work out but she likes everything else about the knife then you can go that route. If I had a need for a chef's knife and was keeping my choices to local retail stores I'd buy the Kaizen and never look back.

Oh, I also think the Birchwood line looks great too. I'd could be happy with either line.

vfamily
08-09-2011, 08:13 PM
If it was me I'd go for the Miyabi Kaizen 8" chef while it's on sale for $100. I know she likes a shorter knife, but Sur La Table has such a generous return policy your wife could use it for a while to try and get accustomed to the length. If after a month she doesn't like it, take it back and get something else. There's also a 6" chef for more money so if the 8" doesn't work out but she likes everything else about the knife then you can go that route. If I had a need for a chef's knife and was keeping my choices to local retail stores I'd buy the Kaizen and never look back.

Oh, I also think the Birchwood line looks great too. I'd could be happy with either line.

Wife tried the Birchwood, but that is was awfully slippery when she was cutting a potato. It's good to know they have a good return policy. We bought some stuff there I think we are going to return, and I might just have her buy the knife she wants. Then I might get an 8" Forschner Chef's knife for me when I grill.

She isn't hot on the idea of a magnetic strip. Says she doesn't like the look. What are your thoughts on the Kapoosh? http://www.google.com/products/catalog?client=browser-rockmelt&channel=omniboxsourceid%3Dchrome&q=kapoosh&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=16052535193570751690&sa=X&ei=dc9BTpHECc3OgAfNjeWgCQ&ved=0CCQQ8wIwAA

jm2hill
08-09-2011, 08:18 PM
She isn't hot on the idea of a magnetic strip. Says she doesn't like the look. What are your thoughts on the Kapoosh? http://www.google.com/products/catalog?client=browser-rockmelt&channel=omniboxsourceid%3Dchrome&q=kapoosh&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=16052535193570751690&sa=X&ei=dc9BTpHECc3OgAfNjeWgCQ&ved=0CCQQ8wIwAA

You'll be happy with the Forschner, sharp and you'll enjoy it, take it too a sharpener once a year and you'll for the most part always be happy with its performance.

I have a magnetic strip and love it so I can show off some knives but thats all just preference.

This is the first time seeing the kapoosh and I think that its hilarious but I love it.

something like this - http://www.amazon.com/Kapoosh-Knife-Utensil-Holder-Kitchen/dp/B0017SWZ52/ref=sr_1_6?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1312935942&sr=1-6

Not sure what it will do to the edge of knives but may order it just to see.

vfamily
08-09-2011, 08:29 PM
ooh, did't know about the caddy.

vfamily
08-10-2011, 02:19 AM
I really hope I can convince her on this.

http://www.amazon.com/Endurance-Magnetic-Knife-Holder-10-inch/dp/B000FM7KV0/ref=sr_1_8?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1312957411&sr=1-8

Eamon Burke
08-10-2011, 09:54 AM
I really hope I can convince her on this.

http://www.amazon.com/Endurance-Magnetic-Knife-Holder-10-inch/dp/B000FM7KV0/ref=sr_1_8?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1312957411&sr=1-8

I think you should consider upgrading to this one (http://benchcrafted.com/Ordering.html), it's prettier(for the wife's decor) and better for your knife, because there isn't a strip of exposed metal-on-metal action.



I recommend that you either learn to sharpen it(if you want to invest the time and energy to gain a permanent skill), or get a pro to do it. If you try out a local guy, I'd be careful to make sure he is qualified(there's a lot of hacks out there), and if you want to do mail order, that's a good route, though you won't have your knife for a few weeks. A good pro sharpening is top notch, and will last a VERY long time at home, provided you aren't cutting on glass/poly/cheap bamboo.

vfamily
08-10-2011, 01:29 PM
I think you should consider upgrading to this one (http://benchcrafted.com/Ordering.html), it's prettier(for the wife's decor) and better for your knife, because there isn't a strip of exposed metal-on-metal action.



I recommend that you either learn to sharpen it(if you want to invest the time and energy to gain a permanent skill), or get a pro to do it. If you try out a local guy, I'd be careful to make sure he is qualified(there's a lot of hacks out there), and if you want to do mail order, that's a good route, though you won't have your knife for a few weeks. A good pro sharpening is top notch, and will last a VERY long time at home, provided you aren't cutting on glass/poly/cheap bamboo.

Those are gorgeous, except it has to be less than 11 inches to fit on the side of the cabinet.

I suppose I could cut it.

oivind_dahle
08-10-2011, 01:34 PM
Then you order one in 10 inches......

vfamily
08-10-2011, 01:43 PM
I only see 12 and 18" on their site.

oivind_dahle
08-10-2011, 01:55 PM
If you send them an email they will make one for you :)

If you read the FAQ you will see this
∙ My knife won't stick!
It's probably made from stainless steel. Think about getting some better quality knives with more carbon content. Carbon means quality-- edge retention and fine grain for a keen edge. Many of our dealers will be quite eager to sell you an excellent knife. A knife that may well amaze you. Check out some of them on our homepage.

But I think your choice will stick. I have stainless and they stick :)

vfamily
08-10-2011, 02:09 PM
If you send them an email they will make one for you :)

If you read the FAQ you will see this
∙ My knife won't stick!
It's probably made from stainless steel. Think about getting some better quality knives with more carbon content. Carbon means quality-- edge retention and fine grain for a keen edge. Many of our dealers will be quite eager to sell you an excellent knife. A knife that may well amaze you. Check out some of them on our homepage.

But I think your choice will stick. I have stainless and they stick :)

Got it. I will.

Since you are in Norway, what do you think about Fiskar knives?

oivind_dahle
08-10-2011, 02:25 PM
Fiskars:

Well, they are really worse than my Victorinox :)
My GF got some of them when she moved in and I cant stand them. But she refuses to throw them. This one is the last survivor of her Fiskars:
http://images.staples-eu.com/App_Themes/no-NO/images/product/70843_1_xnl.jpg. I hate that one too.

The problem with living in Norway, is that we dont have stores to test out high end knives. Ive read on the net and Ive bought lots of knives (and I mean lots!!!) the past years. But doing so, Ive gotten quite an experience of what is good and not.

If this is meant something to you: My best buy ever made is the Carter. My GF was not into knives at all (and I got some real fancy ones) until she got her Carter. Now she takes care of all the knives and she starts enjoying cooking. Im so pleased Im about to order a new Carter as well. I love my Guytos but then again, the Carter is amazing. I used it more than I thought I would, and my GF uses it to everything. I thought stainless was the **** (well, devins AEB-L is amazing, but I see myself more and more into sanmai carbon/stainless knives. I love white steel, but think Im about to be amazed by Bill Burkes 52100 sanmai. Nothing against the myabi line, but I really recommend you to think about the Carter. IMO best knife for females ever made.

vfamily
08-10-2011, 02:27 PM
Fiskars:

Well, they are really worse than my Victorinox :)
My GF got some of them when she moved in and I cant stand them. But she refuses to throw them. This one is the last survivor of her Fiskars:
http://images.staples-eu.com/App_Themes/no-NO/images/product/70843_1_xnl.jpg. I hate that one too.

The problem with living in Norway, is that we dont have stores to test out high end knives. Ive read on the net and Ive bought lots of knives (and I mean lots!!!) the past years. But doing so, Ive gotten quite an experience of what is good and not.

If this is meant something to you: My best buy ever made is the Carter. My GF was not into knives at all (and I got some real fancy ones) until she got her Carter. Now she takes care of all the knives and she starts enjoying cooking. Im so pleased Im about to order a new Carter as well. I love my Guytos but then again, the Carter is amazing. I used it more than I thought I would, and my GF uses it to everything. I thought stainless was the **** (well, devins AEB-L is amazing, but I see myself more and more into sanmai carbon/stainless knives. I love white steel, but think Im about to be amazed by Bill Burkes 52100 sanmai. Nothing against the myabi line, but I really recommend you to think about the Carter. IMO best knife for females ever made.

My wife is already getting sick of me showing her all these knives. :) I will show her the Carters as well. Also, what do you think about Gunter Wilheim?

http://www.gunterwilhelm.com/Index.php/cutlery/cutlery-sets/2-piece-asian-santoku-knife-set.html

vfamily
08-10-2011, 02:28 PM
By the way, thanks for letting me know about Fiskars.

oivind_dahle
08-10-2011, 02:38 PM
Im no expert and I dont know the maker...

But Gunter would never ended up in my kitchen. The profile is odd and I guess the balance point is totally wrong based on that I think the handle is heavy. The bolster will fcuk up the sharpening as well. Sorry to say, but Gunter is a nightmare to me (based on pics).... (i cant se the geometry, but I guess its FUBAR as well)

Sorry...

vfamily
08-10-2011, 02:39 PM
Im no expert and I dont know the maker...

But Gunter would never ended up in my kitchen. The profile is odd and I guess the balance point is totally wrong based on that I think the handle is heavy. The bolster will fcuk up the sharpening as well. Sorry to say, but Gunter is a nightmare to me (based on pics).... (i cant se the geometry, but I guess its FUBAR as well)

Sorry...

:) NO worries. Just have so many things being thrown at me, and looking at so many things, it's crazy.

SpikeC
08-10-2011, 02:49 PM
That Gunter looks like a candidate for the Ugly thread.

vfamily
08-10-2011, 02:53 PM
That Gunter looks like a candidate for the Ugly thread.

Glad I could help ;)

oivind_dahle
08-10-2011, 02:53 PM
Its a hard choice :)

What I can tell you. If you learn how to sharpen and take care of your knives, you will have a total different view on foods. Most people dont have a passion about food, but I believe life is to short for having bad food. If you have a passion about taste, making food and drinking good wine. Then I really recommend you to start to think about getting a high end knife. The food will be better when done with a sharp knife and you will enjoy making it even more.

The Carter I recommended got both Carbon and stainless clad, so you will get the best from both worlds. Im sure there are sharpeners around in your town, but its also fun sharpening it yourself. If you are really really unsure I recommend you to start off on the buy/trade/sell marked and get your self a cheap carbon knife and a King stone combo 1000/6000. Try it for a month, and if this is for you: welcome to the gang.

If you purely want a high end great knife: go for the carter and have it rehandled. Its not much more than a Myabi Santoku, but will outpreform it by far :)

oivind_dahle
08-10-2011, 05:41 PM
A sharp knife will make you able to do so much more fun in the kitchen :)

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6062/6030019465_76847138e5_b.jpg

jm2hill
08-10-2011, 05:43 PM
A sharp knife will make you able to do so much more fun in the kitchen :)

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6062/6030019465_76847138e5_b.jpg

which carter is that? its beautiful. I want.

oivind_dahle
08-10-2011, 05:45 PM
http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php?2050-Murray-Carter-meets-Darkhoek&highlight=carter

Its actually a cheap Carter, and I bought it on buy/sell/trade here at KKF.

Eamon Burke
08-10-2011, 10:20 PM
which carter is that? its beautiful. I want.

It's his Carter. The Oivind Special. He bought it and had a friend pimp it out.

Quite nicely, I must say.

jmforge
08-10-2011, 11:37 PM
is that supposed to be Mickey or Minnie? :razz::biggrin:
A sharp knife will make you able to do so much more fun in the kitchen :)

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6062/6030019465_76847138e5_b.jpg

vfamily
08-13-2011, 07:34 PM
So here is the plan. Thanks everyone for all their input.

I am going to buy a Victorinox 125 Anniversary 8" Chef's knife. I am also going to buy a 10" BenchCraft magnetic knife holder in Maple.

Then my wife will take the knife class at Sur La Table. Hopefully from that she'll know what kind of knife she needs and what fits her the best. (I am not sold on her needing a 5.5" over a 7"). After that, she can get whatever knife she wants (under $150). Thoughts?

Links to items.
http://www.cutleryandmore.com/victorinox-forschner-fibrox/125th-anniversary-edition-chefs-knife-p122517
http://benchcrafted.com/Magblok.html
http://www.surlatable.com/sku/815159/Essential-Knife-Skills

ecchef
08-13-2011, 10:01 PM
http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php?2365-Pimp-My-Victorinox-2

Eamon Burke
08-14-2011, 12:01 AM
Sounds like a plan. Don't expect that one to stay sharp forever, and wedging will happen. But hey, the price is right for a temporary knife!

I love that Vic steel. It doesn't hold an edge for :censored:, but it sharpens back up in a jiffy!

vfamily
08-14-2011, 12:03 AM
yup. The VF will be for me when I grill.

99Limited
08-14-2011, 08:46 AM
yup. The VF will be for me when I grill.

You know, if you're looking for a knife for grilling duties, have you though about ebay. You can come across some pretty nice old 8" - 10" butcher knives for about the same money. I picked up some NOS Old Hickorys from the '50s that I use for grilling.