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View Full Version : Reverse hollow grind?



Mike Davis
08-10-2011, 01:22 AM
I am curious, and i am hoping that some of the everyday knife users will chime in. I was thinking that if the partial flat grind was on the edge of the holy grail, why not drop the flats behind the grind in some. With a slight(48") concave, would this help with food sticking without sacrificing strength behind the grind? This is just a thought and am in no way trying to "reinvent" anything, just trying to save some headache in the long run.

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c303/munky2/2011-08-10_01-25-28_14.jpg

Thanks
Mike

jmforge
08-10-2011, 01:25 AM
Mike, did you see my post about the "blended" shallow hollow grind?

Mike Davis
08-10-2011, 01:27 AM
No i did not, sorry.

Eamon Burke
08-10-2011, 01:27 AM
I have no idea how that would work. Honestly. All I could add is conjecture, but that's definitely on the list of "try it and see" ideas.

l r harner
08-10-2011, 01:29 AM
nope not new

there are a few that lightly hollow a full flat or even a flat that was convexed int the edge

Eamon Burke
08-10-2011, 01:31 AM
nope not new

there are a few that lightly hollow a full flat or even a flat that was convexed int the edge

How did they work?

Mike Davis
08-10-2011, 01:34 AM
I am just wondering if it would help prevent food sticking and not sacrifice strength. I am going to try it on a piece i am making for myself to test...I plan on testing several designs before i try to sell any knives to anyone. I just want to test the waters so to speak, so i am not chasing my tail.

tk59
08-10-2011, 04:09 AM
This should work fine but the effect will be marginal compared to flat except for realy thin slices, maybe...

SpikeC
08-10-2011, 11:56 AM
This is how Takeda forges his blades. It works quite nicely.

echerub
08-10-2011, 12:17 PM
I was just about to comment about Takeda's knives (at least his gyutos, dunno about the other types) using this approach. Works well for me.

Daniel Fairly
08-11-2011, 12:11 PM
Like a big fuller! great idea!

Marko Tsourkan
08-11-2011, 12:18 PM
There are a few other Japanese makers (and Carter) whose knives feature a similar grind, but it is a mostly a by-product of grinding on 3' (or so) water wheel grinders or forging a blade to shape.

jmforge
08-11-2011, 12:37 PM
Of course, the question is whether after all of these centuries, the grind is still merely a by-product? :wink:
There are a few other Japanese makers (and Carter) whose knives feature a similar grind, but it is a mostly a by-product of grinding on 3' (or so) water wheel grinders or forging a blade to shape.

Mike Davis
08-11-2011, 11:33 PM
Mine would be forged to shape. I plan on forging everything as close to shape as possible. Thought about making a jig to do this, like a fullering tool...exactly Daniel.

jmforge
08-12-2011, 12:25 AM
Anything that you forge in will eventually have to be ground out. On stuff this thin, I would think seriously about scraping or grinding.
Mine would be forged to shape. I plan on forging everything as close to shape as possible. Thought about making a jig to do this, like a fullering tool...exactly Daniel.

SpikeC
08-12-2011, 02:22 PM
Just curious, jm, have you handled a Takeda? They are forged to shape and only the edge is ground.

jmforge
08-12-2011, 02:58 PM
No, I haven't. Is the rest of the blade left in its "as forged" state? Don't the Japanese smiths also "finish forge" their blades cold? That may work for them, but I am not going to hit a piece of cold blade steel with a power hammer if I can help it. Call me an old woman, but there it is.:)
Just curious, jm, have you handled a Takeda? They are forged to shape and only the edge is ground.