PDA

View Full Version : Cutting Boards



welshstar
08-18-2011, 02:55 PM
Is there a link for the differences in cutting boards ?

As a novice i just use one of the commercial grade plastic boards, ive just got a feeling this is not right !!

tk59
08-18-2011, 03:18 PM
There's some info on David's site: http://www.theboardsmith.com/purchase.htm. I have a pile of boards and I like my BoardSMITH boards the best by far.

Eamon Burke
08-20-2011, 11:16 AM
Here's a generally-accepted order of board desirability, from worst to best(not just for how they treat your knives):
Glass
bamboo
Poly
Foldable plastic
edge-grain wood
high-quality end-grain bamboo
sani-tuff
end-grain wood
Boardsmith



What kind of knives are you using, and what are you cooking?

jmforge
08-21-2011, 02:22 AM
You forgot to put "leftover piece of granite or Corian from when you had your countertops installed" in that bottom part of the list. :lol2:
Here's a generally-accepted order of board desirability, from worst to best(not just for how they treat your knives):
Glass
bamboo
Poly
Foldable plastic
edge-grain wood
high-quality end-grain bamboo
sani-tuff
end-grain wood
Boardsmith



What kind of knives are you using, and what are you cooking?

Eamon Burke
08-21-2011, 01:02 PM
You forgot to put "leftover piece of granite or Corian from when you had your countertops installed" in that bottom part of the list. :lol2:

Please God no.

welshstar
08-22-2011, 12:01 AM
Please God no.

The builder actually took the time to shape and polish a peice for me.

Dont worry it has never been out of the garage, its handy for cutting and drilling !!

memorael
10-04-2011, 12:55 AM
aren't sanituff boards like... on par with end grain in terms of edge retention? I like how they stop your knife rather than it sliding too, builds good technique IMO.

EdipisReks
10-04-2011, 01:05 AM
i own a pretty nice end grain board (wasn't nice when i got it, but it's nice now), and i've used nice end grain boards, and i have to say that i really like my edge grain John Boos at least as well.

Steve Stephens
11-06-2011, 12:32 AM
While I am reading and learning about Japanese knives I wanted to get started with some new equipment and a cutting board seems to be a worthwhile item.

I am looking at three boards:
Boos Block edge grain at WS 15 x 20 x 1-14 10 lbs. $50
Boos Block edge grain 15 x 20 x 1-1/2 12 lbs. $67
Boos Block end grain 15 x 20 x 2-1/4 21 lbs. $144
Boardsmith end grain 14 x 18 or 20

I want to choose a board for overall long term satisfaction. Will the heavy end grain boards prove to be cumbersome every time I move them from the counter?

Are the end grain boards that much better then the lighter (thinner) edge grain boards?

I do light cooking for myself for the most part. Should I be looking at a smaller size?

Advantages/disadvantages of the Boardsmith board vs the Boos Block?

I love to buy quality tools that will last for the long term and give the greatest satisfaction and ease of use.

Thank you,
Steve

Eamon Burke
11-06-2011, 03:00 AM
Welcome, Mr. Stephens!
:ntmy:


Will the heavy end grain boards prove to be cumbersome every time I move them from the counter?
You don't move them around the kitchen. Basically instead of your board being a scooping tool that you cut on, it is more like a counter that you cut on. It doesn't move around, because it doesn't need to. Some folks use a thin plastic "cutting board" to transfer food from board to pot, but it's annoying to me to clean it every time and keep up with them. I just use my hands, I'm only feeding my family. Either that or I grab the CCK1303. It's worth losing the habit of running around the kitchen with it and sacrificing counter space for the improvement a good end-grain board provides, for your knives, your safety, and your eyes.


Are the end grain boards that much better then the lighter (thinner) edge grain boards?
Not all of them. End-Grain bamboo has a ton of glue in it that is hard on edges, and lesser-quality end grain boards are disposable goods, warping and cracking over time. But end-grain means that the knife will dig into the board(saving the edge, and stopping the knife from slipping), but the cut will heal(preventing nasty gouges). Also, contaminants have been found to sink into the board, and the grain traps it in a dark vacuum and disinfects itself, to some degree. They are quieter to cut on, and look way nicer.


I do light cooking for myself for the most part. Should I be looking at a smaller size?
If you want to save money more than have the space to work with. I always say get the biggest board your counter can fit. I got out a ruler, and asked my wife what is the most space she is ok with losing on the counter forever, and got a board that big. Whether you are feeding 1 or 100, you only cut up one onion at a time, it's just up to you if you want to have to deal with crowding on the board.


Advantages/disadvantages of the Boardsmith board vs the Boos Block?
I don't know if Boos makes different lines, or if they just changed over time, but the Bed Bath & Beyond variety are known to warp, crack, split, etc over about a decade(my folks have a butcher block...an actual table...from Boos and it's 4 decades old--not sure if quality has gone down or what). That's just sitting on the counter, even if you oil it. It is because the wood has residual moisture in it, different amounts of moisture, poor construction, etc etc. The difference between a run-of-the-mill cutting board(no pun intended) and a Boardsmith Board is night and day. It's a permanent purchase, and will outlive you. If you have any problems with it(which you won't), Mr. Smith is fantastic in his dealings with customers.




Unless you are looking for something to throw away in the future, just buy the Boardsmith. You will not regret it, they are fantastic. I've not seen a single board that comes close to it. There may not be a "best knife", but IMO there is a "best board".

Steve Stephens
11-06-2011, 11:52 AM
I will give Boardsmith a call and see if he has what will work for me.

Unfortunately I do not have any countertop space free to keep a board in place. When I need to cut I put a board to the left of my sink which is where I place my washed but still soapy dishes when I wash them and, from there, rinse and into the dish drainer to the right of the sink.

So, with no place to keep a board I will have to pick it up every time I finish using it. That's why I was thinking of a thinner and lighter board.

As for woods, I am set on maple and it's nice that it's also one of the best cutting board woods.

You know, I think I could set a board on edge up against the backsplash behind where I use the board. I do have room there.

Does anyone else have comments about the durability and quality of the Boos boards or if the quality varies with their boards as sold by (and probably made specifically for) WS and BB&B?

zitangy
11-07-2011, 02:03 AM
The regular and popular ones are made of maple.

After purchase, you still need to oil them 3-4 times with mineral oil as the wood is still " thirsty". pour oil and spread it still it refuses to absorb anymore. The angled sides are all too sharp as they are machined and it is sharp and not comfortable as it tends to cut into your hands when you need to lift or carry it. A quick sandpaper job ( I used 320 grit ) before oling solves this.

Maintenance and durability.. same as with all other cutting boards.

Enjoy
~D

Steve Stephens
11-07-2011, 05:32 PM
Thank you all for your help on choosing a board. I just got off the phone with super nice guy David of Boardsmith and have a 14" x 18" end grain maple board on it's way.

I love this forum but find myself spending way more time on it than I really should. Up until a week and a half ago I was pretty content with my mostly Germany knives with an old 10" carbon chef's knife in the bunch. That will be changing very soon as I search out the best Gyuto for me and a smaller knife.

Steve

Steve Stephens
01-13-2012, 02:00 PM
Update on my Boardsmith.

I've been using my 14 x 18" maple end grain Boardsmith now for several months. While I didn't think I had room on my small countertop to keep the board in place it has worked out that way by making some changes in how I wash my dishes in the sink. I couldn't be happier with my board nor the great service I received from David. The rubber feet on the board keeps it dry under the board. I did end up with a board that used shorter blocks of maple than the standard boards that David makes.

Occasionally he has short leftover pieces of wood to glue up into boards; he had some "short block boards" in stock when I called to order. His suggestion (which I had already done) to cut pieces of cardboard to the size of different boards and place them on the counter was a good one as a way to decide on what size board to get.

I found another advantage of a Boardsmith cutting board is that you get to order from the man who makes them and not from a big company.

Cadillac J
01-16-2012, 12:17 PM
Congrats man! I love my 18x24 Boardsmith, and wouldn't trade it for anything. Everyone who comes over, which are 100% non-knife knuts, always compliments how good this thing looks. This corner of the kitchen is where I spend most of my time at home.

http://i52.tinypic.com/bhm3jt.jpg
http://i54.tinypic.com/2db2bkx.jpg
http://i51.tinypic.com/15piafp.jpg